The United States Marijuana Party

The United States Marijuana Party – is a motivated group of Americans who are tired of living in fear of their government because of marijuana prohibition. We are fed up with the intrusion into our personal lives, with urine testing at work and at school, with armed home invasions, and with the possibility of prison because of a plant. WE are Americans and WE do not piss in a cup for anyone!

WE feel it is time for the 20 million Americans who smoke marijuana on a regular basis to stop hiding their love for this plant and unite as one large body of voters to demand an end to the unconstitutional prohibition of marijuana and the drug war. The U.S. cannot lock up 20 million people.

The War on Drugs causes more harm than the drugs themselves ever will.

United WE are a potential 20 million vote political machine. WE want to live free and WE must be determined to stand up, be counted, demonstrate, rally, and write.

Waiting for the government to silence us all in the American prison system is not an option! Too many of our brethren are there, in prison right now.

More Americans are in jail today for marijuana offenses than at any previous time in American history. The war against marijuana is a genocidal war waged against us by a government determined to eradicate our plant, our culture, our freedom and our political rights.

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Time Magazine Reports: U.S. Marijuana Party

U.S. Marijuana Party

By Christina Crapanzano Monday, Mar. 29, 2010
Top 10 Time Alternative Political Movements
Andrew Holbrooke / Corbis

Long before Loretta Nall campaigned on her cleavage, the activist’s cause was cannabis. The Alabama resident gained national attention during her 2006 gubernatorial campaign when she produced T-shirts with the caption “More of these boobs …” (with a photo of Nall in a low-cut shirt) “… And less of these boobs” (next to photos of her opponents). But the write-in candidate’s political roots date back to 2002, when a misdemeanor arrest for possession was the spark behind her forming the U.S. Marijuana Party (USMJP). The group — which demands “an end to the unconstitutional prohibition of marijuana” — has official party chapters in seven states, including Colorado, Illinois and Kentucky. While Nall left the USMJP to be a Libertarian Party governor nominee, the group continues to back candidates in local, state and national elections under the leadership of Richard Rawlings, who is currently running for Congress in Illinois.

Read more:

Bipartisan REFER Act Targets Sessions’ War On Cannabis In High Style

Janet Burns ,

In response to ongoing threats to the cannabis industry from the U.S. Department of Justice and Attorney General Jeff Sessions, lawmakers have prepared a bill meant to nip funding for federal interference in the bud.

Last week, Representative Barbara Lee (D-CA) introduced a house resolution aimed “to protect states and individuals in states that have laws which permit the use of cannabis, and for other purposes,” entitled the Restraining Excessive Federal Enforcement and Regulations of Cannabis Act or REFER Act for short.

Cosponsored by Reps. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Don Young (R-AK), Dina Titus (D-NV) and Jared Polis (D-CO), HR 4779 would create protections for both medical and recreational cannabis by barring federal funding for any efforts by the justice department to interfere in states’ laws when imposing its own.

That includes efforts which seek to “detain, prosecute, sentence or initiate civil proceedings against an individual, business or property that is involved in the cultivation, distribution, possession, dispensation or the use of cannabis in accordance with the law or regulation of the state or unit of local government in which the individual is located,” according to lawmakers.

Congresswoman Lee commented in a statement, “The federal government should respect the will of the voters in states that have voted to decriminalize cannabis. It’s time to stop wasting taxpayer money on the failed War on Drugs.”

Lee continued, “I’m proud to introduce the REFER Act, which would prevent the Attorney General and others in the Trump Administration from stifling the budding cannabis industry. If the federal government chooses to interfere in these state matters, it’s up to Congress to prevent this harmful overreach.”

In a release, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) praised the bill, which it helped Rep. Lee’s team within drafting the language.

NORML noted that the appropriations-targeting bill would also block the federal government from taking punitive action against a financial institution “solely because [it] provides financial services to an entity” that is involved in marijuana-related activities that are sanctioned on the state level.

Dependable financial services have topped the legal cannabis industry’s wish list for years, especially as federal pressure has continued driving many banks and types of investors to keep their distance.

As a result, legal cannabis operations around the country have been forced to get creative with how they manage, protect or just pay taxes on their cash-heavy revenues and products; when police raids, robberies, or even natural calamities happen, the losses that businesses and individuals incur can often be permanent, leaving otherwise growing businesses hi

Justin Strekal, Political Director for NORML, commented by phone that the nonprofit is “incredibly pleased at the leadership that Rep. Lee has shown” in the marijuana space, including through the REFER bill.

“She truly understands that the federal government needs to get out of the way of states that are ending the absurd and racist policy of marijuana prohibition,” Strekal said. “The REFER Act would go a long way to preventing cannabis bigot AG Jeff Sessions from cracking down on the states that have legalized cannabis.”

“It’s a bill with a fun name and a serious purpose,” he added.

In the past year, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle have helped introduce several pieces of new legislation (and some revamped, long-researched favorites) to address the booming fields of cannabis science, industry, and incarceration in a meaningful way.

As in prior years, recent attempts to change federal cannabis laws have explored different legislative routes to getting the DOJ to lay off while states work to figure it all out.

How effective these approaches will be, both in Congress and on the ground, is yet to be seen. In this moment and juncture in the history of U.S. cannabis, however, it’s at least worth noting (as someone who follows the melee) that confident actions and a little humor can go a long way.

CONTINUE READING…

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/4779/text

"We are very optimistic that the case is going to come out the way it should, which is that the Controlled Substances Act is going to be found unconstitutional,"

AlexisInThePatchesOfHopeGardenBeforeGroundBreaking

Jeff Sessions’s War on Pot Goes to Court, Attorney General Will Fight 12-Year-Old With Epilepsy

By Kate Sheridan On 1/18/18 at 7:59 AM

Updated | A 12-year-old suing the federal government may have a whiff of adorableness. But for Alexis Bortell, who filed a lawsuit against Attorney General Jeff Sessions last fall, it’s a choice she had to make to save her life. Alexis has epilepsy, and Sessions has made it his mission to make it impossible for her to access the only drug that has kept her seizures at bay: cannabis.

A Scream of Terror

Alexis doesn’t remember her first seizure. But her father, Dean Bortell, does.

“We were literally folding clothes, and Alexis was sleeping on the couch,” Bortell told Newsweek. “All of a sudden, I heard her make this shriek—I mean, it was a scream of terror,” he said. “I look over, and Alexis is stiff as a board, on her back, spasming.”

At first, Bortell suspected his daughter had a brain-eating amoeba on account of headlines about them that summer and took her to the hospital. Within hours, it became clear something else was wrong. Alexis was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2013.

Three years ago, Alexis began taking medical marijuana, and her seizures disappeared. But that treatment option is threatened by an aggressive federal crackdown on medicinal cannabis led by Sessions, who is also the acting director of the Drug Enforcement Administration. 

Her day in court—February 14, at a New York City federal courthouse—is fast approaching. Alexis won’t be there in person, but her lawyer, Michael Hiller, thinks the ruling will go their way.

“We are very optimistic that the case is going to come out the way it should, which is that the Controlled Substances Act is going to be found unconstitutional,” Hiller said. Several other plaintiffs—a former professional football player, a veteran and another child—are also included.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING…

Sen. Cory Booker was LIVE!

cory booker live

Cory Booker was live.


I’m excited to join Representatives Barbara Lee and Ro Khanna right now for a live press call announcing the House introduction of the #MarijuanaJusticeAct—a bill that I introduced in the Senate late last year.

The Marijuana Justice Act aims to end the federal prohibition on of marijuana in the United States by legalizing marijuana at the federal level, and incentivizing states to legalize it at the state level if they disproportionately arrest or incarcerate poor people or people of color. For decades, the failed War on Drugs has locked up millions of nonviolent drug offenders—especially for marijuana-related offenses—at an incredible cost of lost human potential, torn apart families and communities, and taxpayer dollars. The effects of the drug war have had a disproportionately devastating impact on Americans of color and the poor. Our bill aims to right some of the wrongs of our failed War on Drugs—particularly especially for those communities most hardest-hit by these failed policies—and do the right thing for public safety while reducing our overflowing prison population.

SOURCE LINK

VIEW THE LIVE VIDEO!

https://www.facebook.com/corybooker/videos/10157597581027228/

LIVE! Medicare for All National Town Hall–with Sen. Bernie Sanders!

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Medicare for All National Town Hall

Public

· Hosted by The Young Turks and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders



Details

With the introduction of the Medicare for All Act last year, Sen. Bernie Sanders and 137 of his colleagues in Congress began the long struggle to end the international embarrassment of the United States being the only major country not to guarantee health care to all its people.

Already, 60 percent of the American people want to expand Medicare to provide health insurance to every one, but many Americans still do not know how a Medicare-for-all, single-payer health care system would work in the United States.

To answer that question and more, Sen. Sanders and leading digital outlets NowThis, ATTN: and The Young Turks are partnering on a groundbreaking Medicare for All Town Hall event January 23 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

For the first time, leading digital outlets will come together to do what cable channels and network news will not– engage in an in-depth conversation about one of the issues that matter most to Americans, their health care. Streamed live across multiple social media channels, Sen. Sanders and leading health care experts will take questions about Medicare for All from people around the country and discuss how universal health care would change the American system.

Location: Capitol Visitors’ Center Congressional Auditorium (CVC-200)

Seating is first-come, first-served. Please arrive early to ensure a seat. No posters or signs will be permitted. ASL interpreters will be present at the event.

SOURCE LINK

https://www.facebook.com/events/923471961163492/

https://www.sanders.senate.gov/download/medicare-for-all-act?id=6CA2351C-6EAE-4A11-BBE4-CE07984813C8&download=1&inline=file

VA says it won’t study medical marijuana’s effect on veterans

The Department of Veterans Affairs says it will not conduct research into whether medical marijuana could help veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, as veterans groups are pushing for the use of the drug as an alternative to opioids and anti-depressants.

In a letter to U.S. Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.), Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin said VA’s ability to research medical marijuana is hampered by the fact that the drug is illegal federally. Shulkin’s letter came in response to an inquiry by 10 Democrats on the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee. The letter asks Shulkin to commit the VA to investigating whether medical marijuana can help veterans suffering from PTSD and chronic pain and identify barriers to doing so.

“VA is committed to researching and developing effective ways to help Veterans cope with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain conditions,” Shulkin wrote in a response to the members of Congress. “However, federal law restricts VA’s ability to conduct research involving medical marijuana, or to refer veterans to such projects.”

The response comes as at least 29 states, plus the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico, have legalized the use of medical marijuana in some form. Veterans groups, including the American Legion, have been pushing for the drug to be studied and used to help ease the effects of PTSD, chronic pain and other disorders.

“What America’s veterans need prioritized right now is for cannabis to be treated as a health policy issue,” said Nick Etten, founder and executive director of the Veterans Cannabis Project. “We’re desperate for solutions for the conditions we’re dealing with.”

According to a 2017 VA review, about 15 percent of veterans treated at outpatient PTSD clinics reported using marijuana in the previous six months. According to an American Legion phone survey released in November, 22 percent of veteran household respondents said they used cannabis to treat a medical condition. Ninety-two percent of veteran households surveyed for the Legion said they support researching whether marijuana can effectively treat mental and physical conditions and 82 percent said they want to have medical cannabis as a legal treatment option.

Last month the Veterans Health Administration urged patients to discuss medical marijuana use with their doctors. The shift will allow doctors and patients to determine what, if any, effect marijuana use might have on treatment plans. Veterans were earlier concerned that admitting to marijuana use could jeopardize their benefits. But VA physicians still cannot refer patients to state medical marijuana programs because of the federal prohibition.

[ VA Clears The Air On Talking To Patients About Marijuana Use ]

John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management at the Brookings Institution, said even though marijuana is illegal federally, research on the drug is not prohibited.

“Obviously it is federally illegal, but there are no restrictions on doing scientific research on it. Universities do this all the time and there’s a process to go through,” he said, noting that the National Institute on Drug Abuse funds cannabis research. “It’s really a cop out for the VA to say, ‘oh, we’re not doing work on this because of federal law’ when actually federal law allows them to do that.”

Shulkin’s response was “disappointing and unacceptable,” Walz, the House committee’s ranking member, said in a statement.

“VA’s response not only failed to answer our simple question, but they made a disheartening attempt to mislead me, my colleagues and the veteran community in the process” by stating that the VA is restricted from conducting marijuana research. Walz, a veteran, said he plans to send another letter to Shulkin asking for further clarification.

A spokesman for Shulkin pointed to the secretary’s past comments on medical marijuana. Shulkin said in May, “My opinion is, is that some of the states that have put in appropriate controls, there may be some evidence that this is beginning to be helpful. And we’re interested in looking at that and learning from that. But until the time that federal law changes, we are not able … to prescribe medical marijuana for conditions that may be helpful.”

Shulkin said VA is offering a suite of alternative treatments for patients with PTSD, including yoga, meditation, acupuncture and hypnosis. The letter also said VA has a program to reduce the amount of opioids prescribed to patients with chronic pain; since 2013, Shulkin wrote, 33 percent fewer patients were receiving opioids.

There has not been much research into marijuana for medical purposes, in large part because of regulatory hurdles and the fact that marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 drug along with substances including heroin. Until 2016, only researchers at the University of Mississippi were allowed to grow marijuana for scientific use; the DEA relaxed the rules and let other institutions apply to do so, though none have yet been approved.

President Trump said during the campaign that he supports making medical marijuana available to the very sick. His attorney general, Jeff Sessions, is a staunch opponent of marijuana. Sessions this month made it easier for prosecutors to enforce federal law in states that legalized marijuana. Eight states and the District allow the recreational use of marijuana.

Shulkin cited a VA analysis of existing research, which found “insufficient evidence” that medical marijuana helps patients with chronic pain or PTSD and could increase harm in some areas, including car crashes. A study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine that reviewed studies on the health effects of marijuana and associated products found they can provide a “significant reduction in pain symptoms” for chronic-pain patients. But many say there has been a paucity of research.

“There has been no meaningful clinical research conducted on PTSD and brain injuries,” Etten said.

CONTINUE READING…

Ron Paul: Jeff Sessions should be fired over marijuana decision

By Alexandra King, CNN   Updated 9:00 AM ET, Sun January 7, 2018

(CNN)Ron Paul, the former GOP congressman and onetime presidential candidate, called on Attorney General Jeff Sessions to step down Saturday after he moved this week to rescind the Obama-era policy of restricting federal enforcement of marijuana laws in states where the drug is legal.

Sessions’ action essentially shifts federal policy from the hands-off approach adopted under the Obama administration to unleashing federal prosecutors to decide individually how to prioritize resources to crack down on pot possession, distribution and cultivation of the drug in those states.

Currently, recreational marijuana is legal in eight states and the District of Columbia. Twenty-two states also allow some form of medical marijuana, and 15 allow a lesser medical marijuana extract.

Paul told CNN’s Michael Smerconish that Americans should have a choice on marijuana use, and he called Sessions’ actions “unconstitutional.”

    “He represents something that is so un-American, as far as I’m concerned,” the Texas libertarian said.

    “The war on drugs, to me, is a war on liberty. I think that we overly concentrate on the issue of the drug itself, and I concentrate on the issue of freedom of choice, on doing things that are of high risk,” he said. “And we permit high risk all the time. … Generally, we allow people to eat what they want, and that is very risky. But we do overly concentrate on what people put into their bodies.”

    Paul called the war on drugs a “totally illegal system.”

    “Just because you legalize something doesn’t mean everyone’s going to do it, and then if you look at the consequences, of the war? Why don’t the people just look and read and study Prohibition? … (a) total failure. And the war on drugs is every bit as bad and worse,” he said.

    “People should have the right or responsibility of dealing with what is dangerous,” Paul insisted. “Once you get into this thing about government is going to protect us against ourselves, there’s no protection of liberty.”

    However, he said, he didn’t expect Sessions to be successful.

    “I predict that Sessions is not going to be victorious on this,” Paul told Smerconish.

    “And unfortunately, it’s for reasons that I don’t get excited about. It’s because the states want to collect all of those taxes (on marijuana), so it becomes this tax issue,” he said.

    CONTINUE READING AND VIDEO!

    Justice Department Issues Memo on Marijuana Enforcement 1/4/2018

    Department of Justice

    Office of Public Affairs


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Thursday, January 4, 2018

    Justice Department Issues Memo on Marijuana Enforcement

    The Department of Justice today issued a memo on federal marijuana enforcement policy announcing a return to the rule of law and the rescission of previous guidance documents. Since the passage of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) in 1970, Congress has generally prohibited the cultivation, distribution, and possession of marijuana.

    In the memorandum, Attorney General Jeff Sessions directs all U.S. Attorneys to enforce the laws enacted by Congress and to follow well-established principles when pursuing prosecutions related to marijuana activities. This return to the rule of law is also a return of trust and local control to federal prosecutors who know where and how to deploy Justice Department resources most effectively to reduce violent crime, stem the tide of the drug crisis, and dismantle criminal gangs.

    “It is the mission of the Department of Justice to enforce the laws of the United States, and the previous issuance of guidance undermines the rule of law and the ability of our local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement partners to carry out this mission,” said Attorney General Jeff Sessions. “Therefore, today’s memo on federal marijuana enforcement simply directs all U.S. Attorneys to use previously established prosecutorial principles that provide them all the necessary tools to disrupt criminal organizations, tackle the growing drug crisis, and thwart violent crime across our country.”

    Attachment(s):

    Download Marijuana Enforcement 1.4.18

    Component(s):

    Office of the Attorney General

    Press Release Number:

    18-8

    Updated January 4, 2018

    SOURCE LINK

    The legacy of Manfred Donike

    Image result for manfred donike

    For all of his hard work attending school and graduating as a German Chemist, while participating in the Tour de France in the 60’s, Manfred Donike was most widely known as an “doping expert” and is credited with the first accurate urine testing procedures.

    He was Director for the Institute for Biochemistry at the German Sports University Cologne and head of drug testing operations at the 1972 Munich Olympics.

    Manfred Donike, at 61 years old, suffered a major heart attack and died in flight to Johannesburg to set up a drug testing lab for the All-African Games in August of 1995. 

    There is a Manfred Donike Institute, and a Manfred Donike Workshop which is closed to the public.  There is also a Manfred Donike Award !

    At the time of his death, Dr. Don Catlin, head of the Paul Ziffrin Analytical Laboratory at UCLA stated:

    “He devised all the chemical methods of identifying prohibited substances.  This is a staggering blow (to the anti-doping movement), but we will recover…”LINK

    The first thing I saw on google January 3rd,  while browsing the news was an article at the Daily Beast written by Christopher Moraff.

    Jeff Sessions’ Marijuana Adviser Wants Doctors to Drug-Test Everyone

    I had to look two or three times with my glasses on just to make sure of what I was seeing.  I checked to see if it was a spoof – and it is not – as it is being reported by a number of news sites.

    I immediately thought to myself, “I wonder if Manfred Donike knew what would happen when he came up with the procedure for drug-testing?”  Did he have any idea that this testing would be used to imprison people throughout the World?  Did he know how many Children would be separated from their Parents for nominal use of any substance that the Government saw fit to deem illicit?  Did he know how many people would go to jail or prison or possibly a mental health facility for smoking Marijuana?

    Then, on January 4th we wake up to this news!

    Sessions to rescind Obama-era rules on non-interference with states where pot is legal

    Manfred Donike was appointed director of the Institute of Biochemistry at the German Sport University in Cologne in 1977, he is THE man who was responsible for the development of drug testing which is still used today.

    Single handedly he is responsible for more people being imprisoned or confined in facilities for drug use than any other person on Earth.   Whether or not he realized at the time what would happen we will probably never know.   Continuing long after his death the long arm of drug testing has nestled into every Country on the face of the planet and threatens to control all of Society at large for a long time to come… 

    His lab work also led to the massive drug bust at the 1983 Pan American Games  LINK

    Dr. Robert Dupont formerly of NIDA, Kevin Sabet of Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), and several other notable anti-legalization Activists joined Mr. Sessions in a meeting to discuss the situation regarding the many States who have “legalized” Marijuana in December. 

    “I think it’s a big issue for America, for the country, and I’m of the general view that this is not a healthy substance,”  USAG Jeff Sessions  LINK       VIDEO LINK

    As the meeting was closed-door there was no initial reports except to the fact that it did take place.  Mr. Sessions said this about the meeting…

    We’re working on that very hard right now,” he said on Wednesday. “We had meetings yesterday and talked about it at some length. It’s my view that the use of marijuana is detrimental and we should not give encouragement in any way to it. And it represents a federal violation which is in the law and is subject to being enforced, and our priorities will have to be focused on all the things and challenges that we face.”(USAG Sessions) LINK

    As of this morning, we know what he decided to do!  The “COLE MEMO” will be rescinded.

    (CNN)In a seismic shift, Attorney General Jeff Sessions will announce Thursday that he is rescinding a trio of memos from the Obama administration that adopted a policy of non-interference with marijuana-friendly state laws, according to a source with knowledge of the decision. LINK

    If anyone thinks that it is not feasible for the Federal Government to drug-test everyone, they would be wrong.  The health-care system is set up as a monitoring system.  At some point everyone will have to see a doctor for illness. 

    A national model bill Dr. DuPont wrote in 2010 called for testing  anyone stopped for suspicion of DUI for all controlled substances, and arresting them if any trace amount at all is detected.

    “Doctors already check for things like cholesterol and blood sugar, why not test for illicit drugs.”

    — Dr. Robert DuPont

    Ultimately, it will all lead you back to Agenda 21/30.  The total control of the people through the food and medicine (and plants) you consume.  Add to that drug testing at your local PCP and the NWO has us rounded up pretty well.

    The principle of fair play forbids saying someone is guilty without evidence.”

    Therefore, we MUST have evidence.  And what better way to have the evidence at hand than to routinely urine test every citizen  as part of our healthcare, as a way to keep us free from addiction?  Not to mention the fact that it is all conveniently entered into a computerized health care system for easy access by any Federal entity that is deemed appropriate at the time.  Sounds like a great plan to me…(!!) if I were interested in maintaining total control over the population and keeping the prison industrial complex flowing…

    Additionally, there was an article written by R. William Davis, entitled “Shadow of the Swastika – The Elkhorn Manifesto” which outlines the historical avenues which were taken to get us where we are at today.  Today, on the anniversary of Gatewood Galbraith’s death I invite you to take a look at it.  It is a very interesting and informative read.

    After the morning news today there isn’t much more to be said about what is happening unless they literally declare martial law across the Nation just to control the potheads.

    I can’t wait for the new “memo” to come out!

    I’ll keep you informed…

    RELATED:

    “Rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to purposes and principles of the United Nations.” HOW THE UNITED NATIONS IS STEALING OUR “UNALIENABLE RIGHTS” TO GROW FOOD AND MEDICINE THROUGH THE U.N. CONVENTION ON NARCOTIC DRUGS AND AGENDA 21.

    IMG_20140509_134339

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/jeff-sessions-marijuana-adviser-wants-doctors-to-drug-test-everyone

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txukr5zgHnw

    https://www.c-span.org/video/?438309-1/attorney-general-sessions-makes-remarks-drug-policy

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/flo-jo-passed-all-drug-tests/

    https://www.marijuanamoment.net/jeff-sessions-just-met-anti-marijuana-activists/

    https://www.marijuanamoment.net/trump-administration-considering-marijuana-policy-changes-sessions-says/

    https://fis.dshs-koeln.de/portal/en/organisations/manfreddonikeinstitut(370032ec-cc3e-4785-b263-4c184c4f91f8).html

    https://www.agilent.com/en/manfred-donike-award

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27732762

    http://mdi-workshop.com/login.php

    http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1995-08-22/news/9508220085_1_doping-chinese-athletes-drug-testing

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munich_massacre

    https://www.justice.gov/iso/opa/resources/3052013829132756857467.pdf

    https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/in-remembrance-of/gatewood/

    https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/

    Sessions to rescind Obama-era rules on non-interference with states where pot is legal

    By Laura Jarrett, CNN Updated 10:07 AM ET, Thu January 4, 2018

    sessions mj

    (CNN)  In a seismic shift, Attorney General Jeff Sessions will announce Thursday that he is rescinding a trio of memos from the Obama administration that adopted a policy of non-interference with marijuana-friendly state laws, according to a source with knowledge of the decision.

    While many states have decriminalized or legalized marijuana use, the drug is still illegal under federal law, creating a conflict between federal and state law.

    Sessions: DOJ looking at 'rational' marijuana policy

    Sessions: DOJ looking at ‘rational’ marijuana policy

    The main Justice Department memo addressing the issue, known as the “Cole memo” for then-Deputy Attorney General Jim Cole in 2013, set forth new priorities for federal prosecutors operating in states where the drug had been legalized for medical or other adult use. It represented a major shift from strict enforcement to a more hands-off approach, so long as they didn’t threaten other federal priorities, such as preventing the distribution of the drug to minors and cartels.

      The memo will be rescinded but it’s not immediately clear whether Sessions will issue new guidance in its place or simply revert back to older policies that left states with legal uncertainty about enforcement of federal law.

      The decision had been closely watched since Sessions was sworn in. He told reporters in November he was examining a “rational” policy.

      CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO!

      Indiana law for felony arrest DNA collection taking effect

      Photo credit: CNN

      INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana authorities are being required under a new state law to collect a DNA sample from those who are arrested for a felony crime.

      The law taking effect Monday requires that police collect a DNA cheek swab, along with fingerprints and photographs during the booking process. That will enable law enforcement to check a database for matches with DNA evidence gathered in other crimes.

      The sample may be expunged from the system if an arrestee is acquitted, a charge is lowered below a felony, or if no charges are filed after a year.

      State legislators approved the new law last April. Supporters contended it would help solve crimes, along with exonerating the innocent. Critics argued the DNA collection goes against the U.S. Constitution’s protection from unreasonable search and seizure.

      CONTINUE READING….

      "Overgrowing the Government"

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