Category Archives: Ecological

Bayer completes $63-billion Monsanto takeover

AFP|Updated: Jun 07, 2018, 06.58 PM IST

FRANKFURT AM MAIN: German chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant BayerNSE 0.00 % said Thursday its two-year pursuit of US-based MonsantoNSE 1.01 % was over, as the two firms signed off a $63-billion merger deal.
“Shares in the US company will no longer be traded on the New York Stock Exchange, with Bayer now the sole owner of Monsanto Company,” the German firm said in a statement.

Here’s what you need to know about the $63-billion megadeal:

– Heroin and Agent Orange –
Founded in Germany in 1863, Bayer is still best known for making aspirin. More infamously, it briefly sold heroin in the early 20th century, marketed as cough cure and morphine substitute.
During World War II, Bayer was part of a consortium called IG Farben that made the Zyklon B pesticide used in Adolf Hitler’s gas chambers.
Through a series of acquisitions over the years, Bayer has grown into a drug and chemicals behemoth.

It reported revenues of 35 billion euros ($41 billion) last year and employs nearly 100,000 people worldwide.
Monsanto meanwhile was established in St. Louis, Missouri in 1901, setting out to make saccharine.
By the 1940s, it was producing farm-oriented chemicals, including herbicide 2,4-D which, combined with another dangerous chemical, was used to make the notorious Vietnam War-era defoliant Agent Orange.
In 1976, the company launched probably its best-known product, ..the weed killer Roundup.
In the 1980s, its scientists were the first to genetically modify a plant cell. Monsanto then started buying other seed companies and began field trials of GM seeds.
It eventually developed soybean, corn, cotton and other crops engineered to be tolerant of Roundup.
Today, Monsanto boasts annual sales of some $15 billion and over 20,000 employees.

A keen suitor –
In an industry preparing for a global population surge with billions more mouths to feed, Bayer was keen to get its hands on Monsanto’s market-leading line in GM crop seeds designed to resist strong pesticides.
It was also lured by Monsanto’s data analytics business Climate Corp, believing farmers will in future rely on digital monitoring of their crops.
The tie-up comes amid a wave of consolidation in the agrochemicals industry, spurring Bayer to become a bigger player if it did not want to get left behind.
But Monsanto wasn’t easily wooed, and Bayer had to increase its offer three times before the US rival finally agreed to a deal at $128 per share in 2016.

High price to pay –
The takeover, the largest-ever by a German firm, comes at a high cost to Bayer.
As well as the eye-watering price tag, Bayer must give up much of its seeds and agrichemical business to satisfy the competition concerns of global regulators.
Those divestitures have gone to none other than Bayer’s homegrown rival BASF, making it the unexpected beneficiary of the mega-deal.
Bayer’s sacrifices mean the takeover will be less lucrative than expected, with annual savings now forecast to amount to $1.2 billion from 2022 onwards — some 300 million less than initially thought.

– Goodbye ‘Monsatan’ –
Hoping to ditch Monsanto’s toxic reputation, Bayer will drop the company’s name from its products after the takeover.
Dubbed “Monsatan” and “Mutanto”, the US firm has for decades been targeted by environmental groups, especially in Europe, who believe that GM food could be unsafe to eat.
Campaigners also abhor Monsanto’s production of glyphosate-based Roundup, which some scientists have linked to cancer.

Friends of the Earth, which has labelled the Bayer-Monsanto merger a “marriage made in hell”, said their protests will now be turned on Bayer so long as it keeps up Monsanto’s practices.

– What does this mean for farmers and consumers? –
The Bayer-Monsanto union follows last year’s merger of US companies Dow and DuPont and the tie-up between Swiss-based SyngentaNSE 0.00 % and ChemChina.
These three giant corporations now control more than two thirds of the global market for seeds and pesticides — although Bayer’s sell-offs have allowed BASF to become a sizeable fourth competitor.

While Bayer has been able to ease regulators’ worries, critics say too much power is now in the hands of just a few players, potentially pushing up prices for farmers and limiting choices.
Bayer has vowed to continue developing some of Monsanto’s most controversial activities, including the crop protection technologies it insists are needed to meet growing food demand.
It has however promised not to introduce GM crops in Europe

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Water Protectors Prepare For Battle: The Next Big Resistance In South Dakota

DAPL

It’s raining buckets outside. The back and forth of the windshield wipers and Siri’s monotone guidance accompanies me through the roads riddled with potholes and semi-trucks. I pass several gated factories to an empty corner of the property, where the Puyallup Tribe and their allies had been protesting the Puget Sound Energy Liquid Natural Gas (PSE LNG) site at the Port of Tacoma in Washington state the day previous. The tribe believes that contaminated soils (the site is within a large, untouched Superfund site) will be exposed by the proposed barge facility on the Hylebos, which would be to the detriment of fishing stocks and negatively impact tribal marinas that are across the waterway from the plant.

Tribal Land Rights

The Puyallup Tribe and their allies are not alone in their fight for environmental justice and their treaty rights. During the Standing Rock protests, headlines of the largest gathering of indigenous nations in modern American history setting up camp drew worldwide attention. Images of Native water protectors and their allies being bitten by police dogs, pepper sprayed during peaceful protest and hit with water cannons in below-freezing weather circulated all over social media and were eventually picked up and globally broadcast by large news networks. Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe member Nicole Ducheneaux, an attorney with the Indian Law Practice Fredericks Peebles & Morgan, currently represents the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is the sister tribe to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. They are both Lakota people and fought together against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), also known as the Bakken pipeline, on the ground and in court.

Ducheneaux’s experience as an attorney includes tribal economic development, gaming, corporate law, construction law, tribal housing and litigation. She has assisted in defending and prosecuting lawsuits in state, federal and tribal courts, and was selected by Super Lawyers Magazine as a “2017 Great Plains Rising Star.” The DAPL dispute raised a lot of questions about territory and treaty rights. Ducheneaux explains simply, “Pursuant to our treaties, our [The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe] rights extend beyond the borders of our reservation…they didn’t extinguish our hunting and fishing rights in those areas. We explicitly have a right to use Lake Oahe, to use the waters and the lands that sustain our hunting and fishing. When pipelines cross under our reserved rights and have the potential to harm our waters that flow into our reservation, then that has the potential to violate a treaty right.”

PLEASE CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO!

How to Contact the 17 Banks Funding the Dakota Access Pipeline Here are CEO names, emails, and phone numbers—because banks have choices when it comes to what projects they give loans to.

The Dakota Access pipeline is funded directly by 17 banks, many of which—Citibank, Wells Fargo—are ones you’ve probably heard of or do business with.

Banks are more susceptible to public pressure than the oil and gas giants.

Researchers with the nonprofit Food & Water Watch found that 38 banking institutions are involved in funding the proposed Bakken pipeline, which would stretch from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. A section of this project is the Dakota Access pipeline, where the Standing Rock Sioux and thousands of allies have physically put themselves in the path of the pipeline to protect their reservation and a stretch of the Missouri River.

Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, recently wrote an article for YES! suggesting that banks are more susceptible to public pressure than the oil and gas giants, which depend on bank loans and lines of credit to build their pipelines. “It’s probably sustained public pressure that will do the most good,” he wrote.

Wondering what to say to a bank executive?

Food & Water Watch researcher Hugh MacMillan: “Ask these banks to clarify whether funds they are providing are being used, in any amount, to pay for the heavily militarized response to the Standing Rock Sioux, including the attack dogs, sound-cannon trucks, heavily armed officers, and even a crop duster spraying undetermined chemicals over the camp.

“People should also ask these institutions why they are sinking so much money into maximizing the amounts of oil and gas that can be brought to the surface and burned at a time when climate science is clear we have to maximize what we keep in the ground instead,” said MacMillan.

 

Wells Fargo*

CEO Timothy J. Sloan
timothy.j.sloan@wellsfargo.com
BoardCommunications@wellsfargo.com
866-249-3302

Corporate Office:
Wells Fargo
420 Montgomery Street
San Francisco, CA 94104

BNP Paribas*

CEO Jean-Laurent Bonnafe
jean-laurent.bonnafe@bnpparibas.com

Corporate Office:
3 rue d’Antin
75002 Paris, France
00-33-157-082-200

U.S. Office:
787 Seventh Avenue – The Equitable Tower
New York, NY 10019
212-841-3000

SunTrust*

CEO William H. Rodgers Jr.

Corporate Office:
303 Peachtree Street NE
Atlanta, GA 30308
800-786-8787

Chief Communications Officer:
Sue Mallino
404-813-0463
sue.mallino@suntrust.com

The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ*

Chairman Nobuyuki Hirano

CEO and President Takashi Oyamada

Corporate Office:
2-7-1, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo, Japan
81-3-3240-8111

U.S. Office:
1251 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10020-1104
212-782-4000

Mizuho Bank*

President and CEO Nobuhide Hayashi

Corporate Office:
Otemachi Tower
1-5-5, Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-8176, Japan
81-3-3214-1111

U.S. Office:
1251 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10020
212-282-3000

Citibank (CitiGroup)*

CEO Michael Corbat
michael.corbat@citi.com
212-793-1201

Corporate Office:
388 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013
Phone: 800-285-3000 and 212-793-0710

TD Securities*

Chairman, CEO, and President Bob Dorrance

Corporate Office:
P.O. Box 1, TD Bank Tower
66 Wellington Street W
Toronto, Ontario
M5K 1A2

Investment Banking: 416-307-8500
Equity Research: 416-307-9360
Trading Floor Enquiries: 416-944-6978

U.S. Office:
31 West 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019-6101
212-827-7000

Credit Agricole*

CEO Jean-Paul Chifflet

Office:
12, Place des Etats-Unis
Montrouge, France 92545
33-1-43-23-52-02

U.S. Office:
1301 Avenue of the Americas,
New York, NY 10019
infoamericas@ca-cib.com

Intesa SanPaolo*

CEO Carlo Messina

Corporate Office:
Piazza San Carlo, 156
10121 Torino, Italy
39-011-555-1

Corporate Social Responsibility Unit:
39-02-8796-3435
CSR@intesasanpaolo.com
sostenibilita.ambientale@intesasanpaolo.com

ING Bank*

CEO and Executive Board Chairman Ralph A.J.G Hamers

Wholesale Banking, Operations & IT, Sustainability, Corporate Governance:
Carolien van der Giessen
carolien.van.der.giessen@ing.com
31-20-576-63-86

Head of Media Relations:
Raymond Vermuelen
raymond.vermeulen@ing.com
31-20-576-63-69

Corporate Office:
Amsterdamse Poort
Bijlmerplein 888
1102 MG Amsterdam
The Netherlands
31-20-5639111

Mailing Address:
ING Bank N.V.
P.O. Box 1800
1000 BV Amsterdam
The Netherlands

U.S. Office:
ING Financial Holdings LLC
1325 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10019
646-424-6000

Natixis*

CEO Pierre Servant

Corporate Office:
Natixis Global Asset Management, S.A.
21 quai d’Austerlitz
75634 Paris Cedex 13, France
33-1-78-40-90-00

U.S. Office:
Natixis Global Asset Management, L.P.
399 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
617-449-2100 


BayernLB*

CEO Johannes-Jorg Riegler

Head of Communications:
Matthias Priwitzer
Matthias.Priwitzer@bayernlb.de
49-89-2171-21255

Corporate Office:
Brienner Straße 18
80333 Munich
49-89-2171-27176

U.S. Office:
560 Lexington Avenue
New York City, NY 10022
212-310-9800

BBVA Securities*

CEO Carlos Torres Villa

Executive Chairman Francisco Gonzalez Rodriguez

Corporate Office:
Calle Azul, 4
28050 Madrid, Spain

34-902-22-44-66

DNB First Bank*

CEO and President William J. Hieb
610-269-1040

Main Branch:
4 Brandywine Avenue
Downingtown, PA 19335
484-691-3621

ICBC London*

CEO and Managing Director Jin Chen

Corporate Office:
20 Gresham Street
London EC2V 7JE, United Kingdom
44-203-145-5000

U.S. Office:
520 Madison Avenue 28th Floor
New York, NY 10022
212-407-5000

SMBC Nikko Securities*

President and CEO Yoshihiko Shimizu

Corporate Office:
3-1, Marunouchi 3-chome, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-8325, Japan
81-3-5644-3111

Societe General*

CEO Frederic Oudea
https://www.linkedin.com/in/fredericoudea

Chiarman of the Board Lorenzo Bini Smaghi
lorenzo.binismaghi@snam.it

Corporate Office:
29 boulevard Haussmann 75009
Paris, France
2.0@societegenerale
33-1-42-14-20-00

U.S. Office:
245 Park Avenue
New York City, NY 10167
212-278-6000

The following banks are involved in funding for the entire Bakken pipeline:

Royal Bank of Scotland

CEO Ross McEwan
ross.mcewan@rbs.co.uk

Director of Media Relations:
Chris Turner
44-20-7672-4515

Corporate Office:
Gogarburn
175 Glasgow Road
Edinburgh, United Kingdom
44-131-626-3263

U.S. Office:
600 Washington Boulevard
Stamford, CT 06901
203-897-2700

ABN Amro Capital

Chairman of the Board Gerrit Zalm

Corporate Office:
ABN AMRO Bank N.V.
Gustav Mahlerlaan 10
1082 PP Amsterdam
The Netherlands
31-10-241-17-23

U.S. Office:
100 Park Avenue, 17th floor
New York, NY 10017
917-284-6800

Bank of Nova Scotia (Scotiabank)

CEO and President Brian J. Porter

Corporate Office:
Scotia Plaza
44 King Street W
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M5H 1H1
416-866-6161
email@scotiabank.com

U.S. Office:
250 Vesey Street,
23rd and 24th floors
New York, NY 10281
212-225-5000

Scotia Howard Weil (“Energy Investment Boutique”):
Energy Centre
1100 Poydras Street Suite 3500
New Orleans, LA 70163
504-582-2500 and 800-322-3005
howardweil@howardweil.com

Citizens Bank

Chairman and CEO Bruce Van Saun

Head of Media Relations:
Peter Lucht
Peter.Lucht@citizensbank.com
781-655-2289

Consumer Lending, Business Banking, Wealth Management, Corporate:
Lauren DiGeronimo
Lauren.Digeronimo@citizensbank.com
781-471-1454

Corporate Office:
1 Citizens Plaza
Providence, RI 02903
401-456-7000

Comerica Bank

Chairman and CEO Ralph W. Babb Jr.

Investor Relations:
214-462-6831

Corporate Contacts:
Wendy Bridges
wwbridges@comerica.com
214-462-4443

Wayne Mielke
wjmielke@comerica.com
214-462-4463

Corporate Office:
Comerica Bank Tower
1717 Main Street
Dallas, TX 75201
800-521-1190

U.S. Bank

Chairman and CEO Richard K. Davis
richard.davis@usbank.com

Senior Vice President of Corporate Communications Dana Ripley
dana.ripley@usbank.com
612-303-3167

Brand, Corporate Social Responsibility, Sponsorships:
Susan Beatty
susan.beatty@usbank.com
612-303-9229

Corporate Office:
U.S. Bancorp Center
800 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, MN 55402
800-685-5065 and 651-466-3000

PNC Bank

Chairman, President, and CEO William S. Demchak

Media Relations:
Fred Solomon
corporate.communications@pnc.com
412-762-4550

Investor Relations:
Bryan K. Gill
investor.relations@pnc.com
412-768-4143

Corporate Office:
300 Fifth Avenue
The Tower at PNC Plaza
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
412-762-2000

Barclays

Chairman John McFarlane
john.mcfarlane@barclays.com
CEO Jes Staley

Corporate Office:
Barclays Bank PLC
1 Churchill Place
London E14 5HP, United Kingdom
44-20-7116-1000

U.S. Office:
Barclays
745 7th Avenue
New York, NY 10019
212-526-7000

Press Office:
212-526-7000
CorporateCommunicationsAmericas@barclays.com

JPMorgan Chase

Chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon
jamie.dimon@jpmchase.com
212-270-1111

Corporate Contacts:
Andrew Gray
andrew.s.gray@jpmchase.com

Jennifer Lavoie
jennifer.h.lavoie@jpmchase.com

Brian Marchiony
brian.j.marchiony@jpmorgan.com

Corporate Office:
270 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10017-2014

Bank of America

President, CEO, and Chairman Brian Moynihan

brian.t.moynihan@bankofamerica.com

Executive Relations, Office of the CEO:
Matthew Task
813-805-4873

Corporate Office:
100 N Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC 28255

Deutsche Bank

CEO John Cryan

Corporate Contact:
Renee Calabro
renee.calabro@db.com
212-250-5525

Corporate Address:
Deutsche Bank AG
Taunusanlage 12
60325 Frankfurt Am Main (for letters and postcards: 60262)
Germany
49-69-910-00

U.S. Office:
Deutsche Bank AG
60 Wall Street
New York, NY 10005
212-250-7171

Compass Bank

Chairman and CEO Manolo Sanchez

Director of External Communications:
Christina Anderson
christina.anderson@bbva.com

Communications:
Al Ortiz
al.ortiz@bbva.com
281-433-5640

Corporate Office:
15 S 20th Street
Birmingham, AL 35233
205-297-1986

Credit Suisse

CEO Tidjane Thiam

Board Chairman Urs Rohner

Suisse Banking Ombudsman:
Bahnhofplatz 9
P.O. Box 1818
CH 8021 Zurich, Switzerland
41-43-266-14-14

Corporate Office:
Uetlibergstrasse 231
P.O. Box 700
CH 8070 Zurich, Switzerland
41-44-333-11-11

U.S. Office:
650 California Street
San Francisco, CA 94108
Phone: 415-249-2100

DNB Capital/ASA

CEO Rune Bjerke
https://www.linkedin.com/in/rune-bjerke-04714639

Chairwoman of the Board Anne Carine Tanum
47-915-04800

Executive Vice President Communications Even Westerveld
47-400-16-744

Corporate Address:
Dronning Eufemias Gate 30
0191 Oslo, Norway

Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

President and CEO Takeshi Kunibe

Corporate Office:
1-1-2, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo, Japan
81-3-3282-8111

U.S. Office:
277 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10172
212-224-4000

Royal Bank of Canada

CEO David I. McKay

CEO and Board Communications:
Paul French
paul.french@rbc.com
416-974-3718

Corporate Media Relations:
Catherine Hudon
catherine.hudon@rbc.com
416-974-5506

Corporate Address:
200 Bay Street P.O. Box 1
Royal Bank Plaza
Toronto, Canada
416-974-5151 and 416-842-2000

UBS

CEO Sergio Ermotti

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sergiopermotti

Head Group External Communications:
Mark Hengel
mark.hengel@ubs.com
Phone: 41-44-234-32-21

Chief Communication Officer-Americas:
Marsha Askins
marsha.askins@ubs.com
212-713-6151 office and 917-226-4743 cell

Corporate Office:
Bahnhofstrasse 45, CH-8098
8001 Zurich, Switzerland
41-44-234-11-11

U.S. Office:
1285 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10019
212-713-2000

Goldman Sachs

Chairman and CEO Lloyd C. Blankfein
lloyd.blankfein@gs.com
917-743-0939 and 212-902-0593

Media Contacts Americas:
212-902-5400

Corporate Address:
Goldman, Sachs & Co.
200 West Street
New York, NY 10282
212-902-1000

Morgan Stanley

CEO James P. Gorman
jgorman@morganstanley.com
212-761-4000

Corporate Office:
Morgan Stanley
1585 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
212-761-4000

Community Trust Bank

Chairman, President, and CEO Jean R. Hale
Senior Vice President, Investments: . Christopher Meng
mengro@ctbi.com
859-389-5300

Corporate Office:
346 N Mayo Trail
Pikeville, KY 41501
606-432-1414

HSBC Bank

Chairman Douglas Flint

Group Chief Executive Stuart Gulliver
managingdirectoruk@hsbc.com

Corporate Address:
8 Canada Square
London E14 5HQ, United Kingdom
44-20-7991-8888

U.S. Office:
HSBC Headquarters
425 5th Avenue
New York, NY 10018
212-525-5600

Head of Media Relations, HSBC USA:
Rob Sherman
212-525-6901

The information compiled here is from the latest information reported by the banks. If there are corrections or additions that we should consider, please let us know. Updated 10/29 to reflect Timothy J. Sloan is now CEO of Wells Fargo.

CONTINUE READING AND SOURCE OF INFORMATION

Indigenous Environmental Network and Alaska Native REDOIL Respond to Obama-Trudeau Joint Statement on Climate Change

IEN-REDOIL

 

For Immediate Release

March 11, 2016

Press Contacts:
Tom Goldtooth, ientomg@gmail.com (218) 760-0442
Faith Gemmill, redoilone@gmail.com (907) 750-0188
Princess Lucaj, princesslucaj@gmail.com (907) 458-8264

Washington DC – In a joint statement released yesterday, President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised that their two countries would “play a leadership role internationally in the low carbon global economy over the coming decades.” They announced new commitments to work together to boost investment in clean energy; establish a pan-Arctic marine protection network and low-impact Arctic shipping corridors; limit greenhouse gas emissions, including methane; and pursue a number of other initiatives designed to slow global warming and speed up protection of the fragile Arctic.
Below is a response statement by the Indigenous Environmental Network and the Alaska Native network – REDOIL.

Tom Goldtooth, Executive Director of  the Indigenous Environmental Network states:

 
“We welcome President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s bilateral dialogue and joint statement on Climate, Energy and Arctic Leadership.
  IEN particularly welcomes the commitment to respect and promote the rights of Indigenous peoples in all climate change decision making. The stated commitment to cut methane emissions from oil and gas operations is admirable and is a strong step towards reducing North America’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is encouraging to hear these leaders talk publicly about reducing GHG emissions and the threat methane poses to overall climate stability.
However, we are concerned that this U.S.-Canada shared vision also promotes a business as usual approach with no further commitments to building a 100 percent clean economy by 2050 and keeping at least 80 percent of fossil fuels in the ground. It appears to rely on carbon trading and offsets as solutions, which only allow carbon pollution to continue at the expense of the communities most affected, including communities in Alaska.

The Joint Statement says the US and Canada intends to implement their INDC (Intended Nationally Determined Contributions) pledges for emission cuts as well as providing help to developing country partners. However, citizens need to know these INDCs are a farce. They will not prevent the stabilization of the global temperature to the 1.5 OC aspiration threshold cited in the Paris Agreement. Instead some scientists project that if we implement the current INDCs on the table, we could see global temperature rise by as much as 6 to 8 degrees Celsius by the end of this century.

Furthermore, IEN rejects the integration of mega-hydro power as renewable energy, as stated in the Joint Statement. IEN is reminded of the Pimicikamak Cree Nation of Manitoba, Canada whose lands are flooded by a mega-hydro dam, who are vehemently opposed to US and Canadian renewable energy standards that allow energy generated by mega hydro dams to be classified as renewable energy.  This rejection also applies to agrofuel and large format biomass projects that use native and GE trees and tree plantations as energy sources for power generation. Under the Statement’s section on the acceleration of clean technology innovation, Obama and Trudeau include strengthening unconventional oil and gas and carbon capture and storage (CCS). This means more hydraulic fracturing development that many community-based Indigenous peoples are rejecting.  CCS is also not supported by many Indigenous peoples, as it violates indigenous natural laws and traditional knowledge.”

The Joint Statement also makes a lot of reference to the Arctic.

Faith Gemmill, Executive Director of Resisting Environmental Destruction on Indigenous Lands (REDOIL), a grassroots Alaska Native group in Alaska states:
“The Joint Statement’s mention of Indigenous sovereignty and inclusion of Indigenous rights is a particularly bitter pill to swallow for Alaskan Natives. We’ve seen our ancestral lands transferred to corporate entities created by land claims and our rights traded for profit at any and all cost. The sovereign authority of Alaska Natives continues to be undermined along with our ancestral ways of life. Business as usual with oil, gas, coal development is devastating and only compounds the effects of climate change.

“Our reality calls for our land and ecosystem to be left intact, that our rights as Indigenous peoples remain intact.   We do not support any agreement, which would continue to threaten our ability to engage in our traditional ways of life. The Joint Statement does little to address this reality, but calls for false solutions such as carbon markets and offsets to somehow end the reality of melted glaciers and sea-ice, rising sea levels, and the pollution of our Arctic homelands.”

Lorraine Netro of Old Crow Agency, Yukon, Canada and Gwich’in Steering Committee board member says:


“For our people, the 15 rural communities that comprise the Gwich’in Nation of Alaska and Canada, protection of the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has always been an international issue. The food security and human rights of the Gwich’in are directly tied to the Porcupine Caribou Herd whose calving and nursing grounds are on the Coastal Plain. Our Ancestral knowledge has long indicated what Western science only more recently has validated – that the Coastal Plain is the biological heart of the Arctic Refuge. We urge President Obama and Prime Minister Trudeau to take immediate actions now for further protections as we face continued threats of oil drilling for this sacred and biologically critical area.”

####

The Indigenous Environmental Network

PO Box 485

Bemidji, MN 56619

http://www.ienearth.org/

States should reject Obama mandate for clean-power regulations By Mitch McConnell March 3, 2015

 

The Obama administration’s so-called "clean power" regulation seeks to shut down more of America’s power generation under the guise of protecting the climate.

In reality, this proposed regulation would have a negligible effect on global climate but a profoundly negative impact on countless American families already struggling.

The regulation is unfair. It’s probably illegal. And state officials can do something about it; in fact, many are already fighting back.

I’m calling for others to join. Here’s why. Every state has the power, in theory at least, to design its own approach to meet the excessive and arbitrary mandates imposed by this regulation. But the purported flexibility is actually illusory.

States report that the regulation’s mandates are not technologically achievable, cannot be implemented under rushed timelines and threaten both state economies and energy reliability for families. Moreover, the regulation actually punishes states for billions they’ve already invested in environmental upgrades.

And yet, the Obama administration is still threatening to impose its own — presumably more draconian — plan on any state that doesn’t do as it’s told. It sounds like a scary outcome. But states shouldn’t be frightened, nor should they allow themselves to be bullied.

For starters, the legal basis for this regulation is flimsy at best. As iconic left-leaning law professor Laurence Tribe put it, the administration’s effort goes "far beyond its lawful authority." And even in the unlikely event that the regulation does pass legal muster, it’s difficult to conceive how a plan imposed from Washington would be much different from what a state might develop on its own.

Since the Obama administration has already decreed that it will be the judge of whether a plan is acceptable or not, it’s hard to see the White House agreeing to much that diverges from its ideological agenda.

Just consider how extreme this regulation is. According to a respected group of economists, the regulation could cost our country about a third of a trillion dollars in compliance costs and cause electricity price hikes in nearly every state.

And who gets hit hardest when energy bills go up? Lower-income families. Seniors on Social Security and a fixed budget. Those who struggle just to get by. These are the people the administration has chosen to attack.

In Kentucky, the regulation would likely shrink our economy by almost $2 billion and throw countless out of work. The commonwealth’s coal industry alone has already shed thousands of coal jobs during this administration’s tenure. And now, many more of the thousands of Kentuckians whose jobs are tied to coal — including many proud miners who just want to give their children a better life — are likely to lose their jobs, too.

In short, this regulation threatens to hurt a lot of people without doing much for the global environment. In fact, it could even make things worse by chasing industrial activity overseas to high-polluting countries like China.

So what are governors and state officials who value the well-being of the middle class to do? Here’s my advice:

Don’t be complicit in the administration’s attack on the middle class. Think twice before submitting a state plan — which could lock you in to federal enforcement and expose you to lawsuits — when the administration is standing on shaky legal ground and when, without your support, it won’t be able to demonstrate the capacity to carry out such political extremism.

Refusing to go along at this time with such an extreme proposed regulation would give the courts time to figure out if it is even legal, and it would give Congress more time to fight back. We’re devising strategies now to do just that.

So for now, hold back on the costly process of complying. A better outcome may yet be possible.

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2015/03/03/3725288_states-should-reject-obama-mandate.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

Chemtrail Source Material Finally Unveiled

 

For the last two decades the source material for chemtrails has been a mystery. Finally, the apparent ‘perfect’ element base material of chemtrails sprayed from airplanes—both government and commercial—that causes blanket clouds and welsbach reflective materials in the atmosphere, has been identified. It’s coal fly ash wastes from coal burning power plants!

Chemtrail Source Material Finally Unveiled

In the almost 13 minute video posted below, the basic scientific analysis of coal ash identifies fly ash, which is high in aluminum oxide—about 30%. From the 9 minute mark on the timeline, important information should be noted.

Apparently, coal ash—both types—is difficult and extremely expensive to dispose of, something like a billion dollar problem per plant, according to the video. However, fly ash easily is transported away from power plants by railcars—the very mode of transportation that brings the coal to the power plant to be burned. Trucks and barges also are used in transporting it to bases for spraying.

What seems to be going on is this: Just like fluoride, which is a protoplasmic poison and toxic waste, coal fly ash has been forced into humans too. We drink fluoride in our municipal water supplies under the guise that it will protect our teeth—what a crock of malarkey!

For at least two decades, we have been breathing coal fly ash deliberately being sprayed as part of weather geoengineering.

Southeast Coal Ash Waste is an important resource to check out.

Here’s another video that shows and talks about the extreme cold weather in the USA and melting Arctic methane as of January 8, 2015.

Commentary is made that no low pressure is allowed to build up in order to control weather in the Pacific and West Coast of the USA. Aerosol trails over California prevent low pressure from building up, which may explain why California doesn’t get rain.

There’s a map in the video with accompanying incredible information. Southern Alaska temperatures in January 2015 are in the 45s and 48. Definitely, not normal! Furthermore, there’s heavy chemtrailing going on over the Gulf of Mexico to keep the Jet Stream straight all the way to Europe. The 2013-14 brutal winter pattern is upon us again—a second winter in a row!

Strange January 2015 Weather Events” around the globe, especially earthquakes! See strange sky things—and all in just one month!

Please share this information with everyone you know. Send it to your members of Congress, state legislators, newspapers, your local weather forecasters—everyone. We have to save our beautiful planet Earth.

Catherine retired from researching and writing, but felt compelled to write this article.

Catherine J Frompovich (website) is a retired natural nutritionist who earned advanced degrees in Nutrition and Holistic Health Sciences, Certification in Orthomolecular Theory and Practice plus Paralegal Studies. Her work has been published in national and airline magazines since the early 1980s. Catherine authored numerous books on health issues along with co-authoring papers and monographs with physicians, nurses, and holistic healthcare professionals. She has been a consumer healthcare researcher 35 years and counting.

CONTINUE READING…

What Is Fracking and Why Should It Be Banned?

 

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The case to ban fracking grows stronger every day. Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing. It’s a water-intensive process where millions of gallons of fluid — a mix of water, sand, and chemicals, including ones known to cause cancer — are injected underground at high pressure to fracture the rock surrounding an oil or gas well. This releases extra oil and gas from the rock, so it can flow into the well.

But the process of fracking introduces additional industrial activity into communities beyond the well. Clearing land to build new access roads and new well sites, drilling and encasing the well, fracking the well and generating the waste, trucking in heavy equipment and materials and trucking out the vast amounts of toxic waste — all of these steps contribute to air and water pollution risks and devaluation of land that are turning our communities into sacrifice zones. Fracking threatens the air we breathe, the water we drink, the communities we love and the climate on which we all depend. That’s why over 250 communities in the U.S. have passed resolutions to stop fracking, and why Vermont, France and Bulgaria have stopped it.

Why a Ban? Can Regulations Make Fracking Safe?

Ban Fracking in Your Area

No. Fracking is inherently unsafe and we cannot rely on regulation to protect communities’ water, air and public health. The industry enjoys exemptions from key federal legislation protecting our air and water, thanks to aggressive lobbying and cozy relationships with our federal decision makers (the exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act is often referred to as the Cheney or Halliburton Loophole, because it was negotiated by then-Vice President Dick Cheney with Congress in 2005). Plus, the industry is aggressively clamping down on local and state efforts to regulate fracking by buying influence and even bringing lawsuits to stop them from being implemented. That’s why fracking can’t be made safe through government oversight or regulations. An all out ban on fracking is the only way to protect our communities.

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