Category Archives: Marijuana and the Law

Colorado girl suing U.S. attorney general to legalize medical marijuana nationwide

Posted 9:24 pm, November 9, 2017, by Rob Low,

LARKSPUR, Colo. — Alexis Bortell is hardly the first child whose family moved to Colorado for access to medical marijuana.

But the 12-year-old is the first Colorado kid to sue U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions over the nation’s official marijuana policy.

“As the seizures got worse, we had to move to Colorado to get cannabis because it’s illegal in Texas,” said Bortell, who was diagnosed with epilepsy as a young child.

The sixth-grader said traditional medicine wasn’t helping her seizures and doctors in her home state were recommending invasive brain surgery.

But a pediatrician did mention an out-of-state option: Medical marijuana.

Shortly after moving to Larkspur, Bortell’s family began using a strain of cannabis oil called Haleigh’s Hope.

A drop of liquid THC in the morning and at night has kept her seizure-free for 2 1/2 years.

“I’d say it`s a lot better than brain surgery,” Bortell said.

But Bortell said the federal prohibition on marijuana prevents her from returning to Texas.

“I would like to be able to visit my grandparents without risking being taken to a foster home,” Bortell said on why she’s joined a lawsuit that seeks to legalize medical marijuana on the federal level.

Haleigh’s Hope.

Since the 1970s the Drug Enforcement Agency has classified marijuana as a Schedule One drug, which in the eyes of federal policy makes marijuana more dangerous than meth or cocaine and on par with heroin.

“How is that rationale? It’s not compassionate either, but rationality? It’s just outrageous,” said Alexis’ dad Dean Bortell.

He showed his backyard fields, where he grows five acres of marijuana plants used to derive the medicine that helps his daughter and patients he’s never met.

“When you look at it from a distance and you see it saving their lives, me as a father and an American, I go, what are we doing? How could you possibly look at someone who`s benefiting from this as a medicine and threaten to take it away?” Bortell said.

Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana.

Alexis’ New York attorney Michael Hiller argues it should be legal nationwide.

“As it pertains to cannabis, the (Controlled Substances Act) is irrational and thus unconstitutional,” said Heller, who added the U.S. government “made a representation that cannabis has medical application for the treatments of Parkinson`s Disease, HIV-induced dementia and Alzheimer’s disease and yet at the same time the United States government maintains that there is absolutely no medical benefit for the use of cannabis. That is of course absurd.”

Denver attorney Adam Foster represents marijuana businesses.

He said he thought the lawsuit was clever but admitted its success might be a long shot.

“Whenever you sue the government, the deck is really stacked against you,” Foster said.

But he added the federal government might have a hard time arguing medical marijuana has no known medical benefits.

“We now live in an era where 62 percent of Americans live in a state where the medical use of cannabis is legal at the state level,” he said.

Alexis Bortell said she hopes her lawsuit will normalize medical marijuana but also legalize it.

“We’ll be able to be treated like what you call ‘normal’ families,” she said.

Bortell is joined in the lawsuit by another child, a military veteran, a marijuana advocacy group and former Broncos player Marvin Washington, who played on the 1998 Super Bowl-winning team.

The federal government has already lost its first motion to have the case dismissed.

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“Using medical cannabis with a doctor’s recommendation in accordance with state law is no excuse for failing a drug test…”

Feds Clarify: Medical Marijuana Isn’t An Excuse In Drug Testing

Published 4 hours ago on November 10, 2017 By Tom Angell

Using medical cannabis with a doctor’s recommendation in accordance with state law is no excuse for failing a drug test, the Trump administration says in a new clarification of federal rules.

“The term ‘prescription’ has become more loosely used in recent years,” the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) writes in a ruling scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on Monday. “Some state laws allowing marijuana use the term ‘prescription,’ even though a recommendation for someone to use marijuana under state law is not a prescription consistent with the Controlled Substances Act.”

Under federal regulations, safety-sensitive transportation industry employees are subject to drug testing. In the instance of a positive test, an employee has the opportunity to show that the result was due to their taking a legal prescription medication.

But now, due to growing confusion related to the increasing number of states allowing medical cannabis, the government is adding language to regulations to clarify that the exemption only applies to a “legally valid prescription consistent with the Controlled Substances Act.”

Marijuana is classified under Schedule I of the CSA, a category reserved for drugs that the federal government believes have no medical value. As such, it cannot be prescribed by doctors; they can only recommend it.

“The key point of the phrase we have added is to make sure that a prescription is legally valid. For example, regardless of any state ‘medical marijuana’ laws, there cannot be a legally valid prescription for marijuana, since it remains a Schedule I substance under the CSA,” Transportation Sec. Elaine Chao writes in the new filing.

“Marijuana is a Schedule I drug and, therefore, regardless of the prescribing physician’s intent, it cannot be the basis of a legitimate medical explanation,” the new filing says. “Consistent with longstanding DOT regulatory language and guidance…[Medical review officers] must not treat medical marijuana authorizations under state law as providing a legitimate medical explanation for a DOT drug test that is positive for marijuana.”

The newly clarified rules take effect on January 1.

CONTINUE READING…

NJ Weedman not guilty on 1 witness tampering count, jury hung on 2nd

Screenshot-2017-11-10 NJ Weedman not guilty on 1 witness tampering count, jury hung on 2nd

By Olivia Rizzo

For NJ.com

TRENTON — A jury on Thursday found Ed “NJ Weedman” Forchion not guilty of the more serious witness tampering crime he was charged with, and was hung on a second count of the same charge.

The marijuana advocate was visibly excited with the outcome.

Once the jury had cleared the court, Forchion raised his hands in victory before making an oral motion to Mercer County Judge Anthony Massi to re-open his detention hearing.

(He remains jailed; Massi noted the oral request, but said it needed to be properly filed.)

As the jury was leaving the courtroom, Forchion leaned down into the microphone and thanked them.

Late Thursday, in a call from the Mercer County jail, Forchion said: “To all the jurors, thank you!”

“I have always believed in the jury system, and in this case it worked out. I’m happy as hell,” he said.

In court, clad in a red and black suit, Forchion had given supporters sitting behind him a quick thumbs up before the jury entered the courtroom. Moments later, they found him not guilty of a second-degree witness tampering charge, and was hung on a third-degree count of the same charge.

Neither Mercer County assistant prosecutors who tried the case, Stephanie Katz or John Boyle, commented on the outcome, saying the matter was still pending.

NJ Weedman on trial: Everything you need to know

NJ Weedman on trial: Everything you need to know

He’s been in jail since March, but Ed Forchion is still making news

Prosecutors allege the marijuana right advocate publicly outed the witness who he believes informed on him to authorities in the investigation that led to the 2016 drug raid of his Trenton restaurant.

The prosecutor’s office now has 120 days to re-try Forchion, or dismiss the charge. A status conference date will be set to discuss the future of the case, . 

In the Thursday night call, Forchion reiterated his stance that there will be no plea bargains, and if the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office wants to try him again, he’s ready for round two.

“I am going to trial,” he said.

After the verdicts, a group of his supporters were initially happy when the jury ruled that Forchion was not guilty on the one count, but became frustrated when they learned he would not be released from jail.

“That’s not what he’s guilty of,” Debi Madeo, Forchion’s fiance, said outside the courtroom, “he’s guilty of being an asshole.”

Madeo said she’s worried Forchion will remain in jail for several more months, until a new trial can begin. She then echoed statements Forchion has made in the past about not receiving a fair trial.

During the trial, prosecutors argued that Forchion badgered the witness online and sent mail to his neighbors.

Forchion testified that he was an “ass,” and he posted on social media a lot, but he did not believe what he was doing was illegal, and prosecutor’s were pursuing a “fake case.”

Daeja Forchion

6 hours ago

UPDATE: Not guilty on 2nd degree ❗️❗️❗️
hung jury on 3rd❗️
another 120 days in jail for another trial
#freenjweedman
#notguilty

Olivia Rizzo may be reached at orizzo@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @LivRizz. Find NJ.com on Facebook

CONTINUE READING AND TO SOURCE LINK!


FACEBOOK LINK

https://www.facebook.com/daeja.forchion/posts/10214652248329573

Thorne Peters and Rebecca Forbes discuss “No Mens Rae” and her charge of Cannabis possession

no mens rae

http://www.thornepeters.com/nomensrea.html


LISTEN to CANNABIS Advocate Rebecca Forbes who stood up to the Court, the prosecution and her own lawyer with the lawful offensive of NO MENS REA against her CANNABIS Prohibition charge and set herself FREE! #NOMENSREA

Thorne Peters Rebecca Forbes

Additional Video…

Thorne Peters No Mens Rae

Thorne Peters SPEAK NOT ON POT!!!!!! JUST SAY: ‘NO MENS REA” then STFU! We don’t need no LEGISLATION! We don’t need no MEDICALIZATION! We don’t need no DECRIMINALIZATION! We don’t need no JURY NULLIFICATION! We don’t need no ABROGATION! We don’t need no JUSTIFICATION! If you or yours are unjustly arrested for PROHIBITION charges, you must proceed PRO SE to jury trial and just say: “NO MENS REA” . . . the lawful offensive to prove that we are FREE by birth not Slave to LEGISLATON! “I AM THE LAW!” “LIVE ON FB” DAILY @4:20 PM ET . . . #NOMENSREA
https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/vb.100002110628199/1122133367867007/?type=2&theater

'ATTENTION! WARNING! DANGER! HARK & PAY HEED!!! JUST SAY: “NO MENS REA!” THEN STFU! PpP! LIKE & SHARE! TAG! NO MORE BLAH BLAH BLAH!  "SPEAK NOT ON POT!" 

EWE THE SHEEPLE are leading lambs to the slaughter with IDIOTOLOGIES such as but not limited to: ABROGATING; MEDICALIZING; DECRIMINALIZING; RESCHEDULING; COGNITIVE DISSONANCE; STRAW MAN; and JURY NULLIFICATION by seeking PROPOSITIONS, LEGISLATION, BILLS, ORDINANCES and PROPOSALS to set us FREE from CANNABIS Prohibition which only supports the position of THE EVIL EMPIRE that enslaves POTHEADZ! POT IS ALREADY LEGAL ALREADY! WE ARE FREE! NO MENS REA! THE FINAL 3 LEGAL WORDS ON THE ISSUE OF CANNABIS FREEDOM FOR ALL . . . and to all a good night! @[100008822553684:2048:Sydney Ballans] @[1162689282:2048:Matt Steinbruck] @[100012166653601:2048:Jonathan Cowart] @[100004487827821:2048:Freya Nino Crow] @[100000250565705:2048:David Nicewarner] @[1426015574:2048:David Babcock] @[100000871728026:2048:Carol Ann Cripps] @[100005886723807:2048:KJ Adamson] @[100001614765211:2048:Richard Hengy] @[100013590918692:2048:Raven Rodriguez] @[100000820750977:2048:Robert Chris Rhea] @[1057767250:2048:Jimmy Vachon] @[100003742462181:2048:Faith Alexandria Oglesby] Falon Hodnett @[1310076699:2048:Charles N Harper Reece] @[1588404774:2048:Troy Harper] @[100000083683847:2048:Rodney Shook] @[1511791133:2048:Rebecca Forbes] @[100000070644829:2048:Carmel Garcia] @[100010115767308:2048:Jack Cole] @[100000280113159:2048:Alan Gordon] @[100002546279203:2048:Matthew Fogg] @[100004126487793:2048:Edward Winborne] @[335844186556925:274:NJ Weedman] Kelly Jacobs @[100009727292480:2048:Jane L Stanley] @[501687:2048:Austin Lewis] @[1120661189:2048:Phil Harris] @[100003673843324:2048:Sway Trebor]'

14:59

http://www.thornepeters.com/nomensrea.html

https://www.facebook.com/groups/333773793715599/

https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/1507763532637320/

Police from a dozen agencies will use handheld devices to test drivers’ saliva for use of several drugs under a pilot program in five Michigan counties.

Roadside drug tests to check for marijuana, cocaine, opiates and more

A Michigan State Police Trooper makes a traffic stop. Police in Michigan will begin testing drivers' saliva for the presence of drugs during a pilot program in five counties that begins Nov. 8.

By Brad Devereaux

bdeverea@mlive.com

Police from a dozen agencies will use handheld devices to test drivers’ saliva for use of several drugs under a pilot program in five Michigan counties.

The Michigan State Police announced Thursday, Nov. 2, it will carry out a one-year roadside drug testing pilot program in Berrien, Delta, Kent, St. Clair and Washtenaw counties. It will begin Wednesday, Nov. 8.

The Alere DDS2 oral fluid test instrument will be used to measure for the presence of drugs in drivers’ saliva, Michigan State Police spokeswoman Shanon Banner said. The device will record results based on threshold limits set by the manufacturer and test for six substances: amphetamine, benzodiazepines, marijuana/cannabis, cocaine, methamphetamine and opiates.

Banner said it should be noted that threshold levels for saliva are different than that of blood.

Drug Recognition Experts (DREs), officers with advanced training in the assessment of alcohol and drug impairment, will carry the devices, MSP said. DREs only will administer an oral fluid test under the pilot program, Banner said.

The drug test will take place roadside, like alcohol preliminary breath test (PBT).

Refusing the oral fluid swab test, a preliminary test, will result in a civil infraction, just like an alcohol PBT, Banner said.

Kent, Washtenaw among 5 counties selected for roadside drug testing

Kent, Washtenaw among 5 counties selected for roadside drug testing

The pilot program will begin next week on Nov. 8, MSP said.

DREs will continue to take blood draws as part of standard procedure in addition to saliva tests, Banner said.

“Drug Recognition Experts will continue to follow the same policies and procedures for investigating a person they believe to be operating a vehicle while impaired on a controlled substance. The only difference in the pilot counties will be if the DRE determines a motorist is impaired on drugs, they will ask the person to submit to an oral fluid test,” Banner said.

CONTINUE READING…

Despite increased social acceptance, marijuana possession arrests increase: ACLU

cannabis-sativa-plant-1404978607akl

ACLU calls for Pa. to legalize marijuana

By Steve Marroni

smarroni@pennlive.com

HARRISBURG – The findings of a new study that black people are eight times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than white people, even though usage rates are just about the same, does not surprise the ACLU.

“The racial disparities in possession arrests have been around for a long time,” said Andy Hoover, spokesman for the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania. “It is distressing that it’s getting worse.”

But what is a surprise, Hoover said, is that possession arrests for marijuana are on the rise around the state, despite an ever-increasing social acceptance.

“We’re seeing now that 59 percent of Pennsylvanians support legalization. Only 31 percent oppose,” he said today, adding “the rise in possession arrests is distressing.”

But he hopes lawmakers are on board with the call the ACLU made today at the state Capitol to legalize marijuana in Pennsylvania.

You can read the full report, Cannabis Crackdown, on the ACLU’s website.

In summary, the authors of the report studied marijuana offenses in Pennsylvania from 2010 to 2016. The study shows:

  • Possession arrests of adults increased 33 percent in that time,
  • Black people were eight times more likely than white people to be arrested, despite similar usage rates,
  • The state police total arrests per year more than doubled from 2,221 to 4,612 in that seven-year period,
  • The cost to Pennsylvania taxpayers has been more than $225 million in that time.

“Legalization is the only solution to this problem,” Hoover said.

Philadelphia engaged in a decriminalization effort in the last three years, said Matt Stroud of the ACLU, who is an author of the report. The data there shows a remarkable decline in marijuana-related arrests there – about 88 percent.

Cannabis consumer advocate Chris Goldstein said since Philadelphia’s decriminalization, there have been no marijuana-possession arrests of the more than 300,000 students on the city’s college campuses, as opposed to Penn State, where 250 students are arrested per year for marijuana possession.

Cannabis consumer advocate supports ACLU stance to legalize

And unlike Philadelphia, the other 66 counties in Pennsylvania show a remarkable increase in arrests, Stroud added.

In reading this report, state Rep. Jordan Harris of Philadelphia, who is chairman of the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus, agrees that marijuana should be legalized. The current laws are “nothing be a war on the people,” he said, and research shows legalization does not make communities less safe.

State representative discusses racial bias in marijuana arrests

“It’s time to stand on research, and the research shows it’s time to legalize marijuana in Pennsylvania,” he said, getting applause from the supporters attending the event.

It is particularly disturbing that racial bias has creeped into marijuana arrests, he said.

“I would much rather my law enforcement officers work on murder, rape and protecting our children than spending our valuable tax resources on arresting people for smoking a jay on their way home from a long day of work,” he said.

The police have more important things to focus on than “a non-violent thing called smoking a joint,” added state Rep. Ed Gainey of Allegheny County.

“We can’t continue to incarcerate,” he said. “What we have to do is legitimize and legalize a drug that the people should have the choice to use.”

State representative calls for marijuana legalization

And consumer advocate Goldstein said while the racial disparity is disturbing, so are the number of lives ruined by possession arrests. He said 70 percent of those arrested for possession are between 18 and 30 years old, and these arrests unfairly impact their ability to find jobs, get an education and make a life for themselves.

While the ACLU and some lawmakers support legalization, it may be a challenging road ahead, but ACLU spokesman Hoover said he is hopefully.

“There is a lot of conversation here in the General Assembly about smart justice,” he said. “There is a recognition that the policies implemented in the last 30 to 40 years have failed. We believe that cannabis legalization is part of that discussion.”

Sen. Daylin Leach, a Democrat from Montgomery County, first introduced a marijuana-legalization bill in 2013, and has a new version of that bill in the Senate Law and Justice Committee now. His spokesman, Steve Hoenstine, said this bill calls for marijuana to be sold at state stores, where there is already a sales and monitoring system in place.

And those sales are projected to “completely close the revenue gap with a brand new, sustained revenue that does not involved a tax increase.”

He said it only makes sense to bring in these funds rather than spending taxpayer money on enforcement.

Marijuana is no more dangerous than alcohol, Hoover added, adding the “reefer madness mentality is old, inaccurate and wrong.”

This post has been updated with more information about a bill currently in committee.

CONTINUE READING, FURTHER INFORMATION AND VIDEO!

DeKalb father sues AG Jeff Sessions over marijuana

Christopher Hopper, WXIA 11:45 PM. EDT July 27, 2017

A DeKalb County father is suing the federal government, namely Attorney General Jeff Sessions over marijuana.

Sebastien Cotte, Stone Mountain, is named in a federal lawsuit filed Monday, July 24 in a U.S. District Court in Manhattan challenging the Controlled Substances Act.

Cotte has a 6-year-old son Jagger who suffers from a terminal neurological disorder called Leigh’s Disease.

Cotte has been giving Jagger cannabis oil for nearly three years and believes it has extended his life.

“Usually 95 percent of them do not make it past 4-years-old,” said Sebastien Cotte, suing the federal government.

In September Jagger will turn seven.

Around the time most kids die from this chronic disease, Cotte moved his family to Colorado and Jagger started cannabis oil.

He no longer takes oxycontin or morphine.

“It’s been game changing for him it’s one of the main reasons he’s still alive today,” he said.

Cotte said marijuana’s medical benefits are keeping Jagger alive, and that’s why he’s a plaintiff in this lawsuit.

Browser does not support iframes.

It’s 90 pages long and is against Attorney General Jeff Session and the federal government for classifying marijuana in a category with heroin and LSD, highly addictive drugs with no accepted medical use.

Cocaine and methamphetamine are Schedule II drugs and are considered less addictive and dangerous compared to marijuana.

Cotte said that Schedule I status is what’s keeping Georgian’s who can legally use cannabis oil from being able to buy marijuana grown here.

“To be able to get it here in Georgia, get a safe legal tested product here in which we could get if cannabis wasn’t a Schedule I substance, that would be life changing for Jagger and thousands,” he said. “You know we have over 2,000 people on the registry right now.”

There are several plaintiffs in the lawsuit in addition to the Cotte’s including a former NFL player and a combat veteran with PTSD.

PDF DOCUMENT OF LAWSUIT HERE

CONTINUE READING / VIDEO…

Shop owner pleads guilty in marijuana pipe case

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Daniel Borunda , El Paso Times Published 6:30 p.m. MT May 16, 2017

An El Paso woman pleaded guilty Tuesday to a federal charge for selling marijuana pipes to undercover officers at her smoke shop in Sunland Park, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in New Mexico said.

Brenda Riveroll, 36, pleaded guilty in federal court in Las Cruces to a charge of selling drug paraphernalia. She was sentenced to five years’ probation as part of a plea deal, prosecutors said in a news release.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said that Riveroll was the owner and only employee of The Smoke Shop on Palomas Court, which sold bongs, glass and metal pipes, scales and grinders for marijuana.

On May 12, 2016, the shop was raided by law enforcement a few weeks after Riveroll had sold the pipes to the undercover officers. On April 3, Riveroll was arrested by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration after she was indicted.

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Federal Appeals Court Sidesteps Major Marijuana Ruling

The Associated Press / May 17, 2017

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court has sidestepped making a ruling on whether U.S. prison officials can hold people who were convicted of marijuana offences that were legal under state medical marijuana laws.

In a decision Wednesday, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals focused instead on a narrower issue.

The court was considering a legal challenge by prisoner Matthew Davies, who was convicted of federal marijuana charges. Davies said he ran medical marijuana dispensaries that complied with California law.

He argued that the Bureau of Prisons could not hold him because of a federal regulation that restricted interference by U.S. officials in the implementation of state medical marijuana laws.

The 9th Circuit avoided the issue, ruling instead that Davies’ plea agreement did not allow his legal challenge. Davies’ attorney, Cody Harris, said he is analyzing the ruling.

Leafly News has obtained the court’s full ruling and uploaded it to Scribd:

LINK

 

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Nevada’s new DUI marijuana testing is improvement but still poses concerns

USMJP4 2100x700

 

Ray Hagar, rhagar@rgj.com

The state of Nevada is poised to mandate the use blood tests and eliminate urine tests in DUI convictions for marijuana.

Although Washoe County already uses blood tests for pot, the state Senate this week gave the final vote of approval for the testing change for the entire state. Now, this measure only needs the final ‘John Hancock’ from Gov. Brian Sandoval to become law.

The final Senate vote floor vote comes less than two months before the July 1 starting date for sales of legal marijuana for “recreation” across Nevada for everyone 21 and over.

The blood-test/pot bill’s sponsor, Assembly Judiciary Committee Chair Steve Yeager, D-Las Vegas, sold the bill to fellow lawmakers as a “common sense” approach to DUI testing for pot. Current urine testing for pot is not reliable because it does not test for the psychoactive element that gets you high — THC, he said.

“A urine test will tell you if someone has ingested marijuana in the past,” Yeager said on Nevada Newsmakers. “But it does not tell you if the person is actually impaired at the time the testing is done.”

Blood tests can reveal THC in the blood, Yeager said. He called it “a step in the right direction.”

Yet this is not a perfect science. Determining marijuana impairment is more complicated than determining alcohol impairment, according to a study by the AAA, the nation’s largest auto club.

Yeager’s bill may be an improvement over the old method but it is still not a great way to test for marijuana intoxication, according to the AAA.

That study states it is not possible to set a blood-test threshold for THC impairment because there is no science that shows at what level drivers become high after ingesting THC, according to a CBS News story about the AAA report.

Some drivers with high levels of THC in their blood may not be impaired, especially if they are heavy pot users, the study stated. Others, who may not use marijuana often, could have relatively low levels of THC in their blood and be impaired for driving, according to the study.

In Nevada, however, almost any amount of THC in the blood will get you into trouble. The legal limit is 2 nanograms of active THC in the blood, which Yeager said is a very low limit.

“I’ll just say, our levels and laws are very, very low. So it is virtually impossible to test positive on a blood test and not be over the allowed limits under the (Nevada) statute,” Yeager said.

Nevada is about to embark on society-changing era where marijuana is legal. The AAA study, however is concerning. It suggests consuming this herb can make you a victim of a legal system that has no universally-accepted and accurate way of testing for DUI marijuana.

Perhaps Yeager’s bill will give Nevada a law based on the best technology available. It appears better than the current system.

Yet science marches on.

Yeager believes that the question of testing for marijuana DUI may need adjustments in the near future. It is a subject that the Legislature may need to revisit when better technology and testing methods become available, since this legal recreational pot business is projected to be popular and profitable in Nevada.

“I think everyone is open-mined about it,” Yeager said about marijuana DUI testing. “It (possible new state law) is a small step forward. But I think it is significant in that it gets us moving in the right direction. Hopefully, we’ll have some studies in the near future so we can continue to tweak these laws.”

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