There are items including T-Shirts available now on Cafepress!

SHEREEKRIDER LLC., Cave City Kentucky  42127

There are items including T-Shirts available now on Cafepress!

The store has been updated to include items from both the U.S. Marijuana Party and ShereeKrider.Com !
Your patronage is very much appreciated and the money goes to support the U.S. Marijuana Party and ShereeKrider.Com!

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I hate the smell of marijuana. It’s fucking horrible.

//thesinbible// -- My Journal

When I was younger I used to have a big hatred of people who smoked weed. The reason was because I was brought up in a strict household who educated me on the harms of drugs and how marijuana makes people act unnatural. I was told that marijuana was only used by bad people and that it was just as bad as heroin and cocaine. For a time I was openly disappointed with my girlfriend who enjoyed smoking weed and I used to tell her how bad it was. She used to lie about how much she enjoyed it just to appease me. Since then I’ve come to realise how ridiculous the claims my parents made about the drug, and came to realise how beneficial the drug is. It doesn’t harm people, it doesn’t turn people into monsters. It’s helpful for my girlfriend with her anxiety, it helped my friend…

View original post 264 more words

Bless The Water around the World on March 22 for World Water Day

 

Join us on World Water Day

in a Global Prayer for Water
Join us as we come together to Bless The Water around the World on March 22 for World Water Day.
Gather at your local water source, or home, and place good intentions and prayers into the water. Let’s stand in solidarity with the world’s Water Protectors and take the first step towards 
cleaning and restoring the world’s water because #WATERisLIFE.
Register now to listen to the free LIVE AUDIO BROADCAST at 5pm Pacific from Unify, led by Chief Phil Lane Jr.
And to watch the FREE UPLIFT FILM, ‘WATER is LIFE’, featuring 
Dr. Gerald Pollack, Mayan Elder Tata Pedro, Dr. Bruce Lipton,
Uqualla Medicine Man, Vandana Shiva and Whaia Whaea.

500,000 people are getting clean water access!

Want to help us make it 1 Million?

Last year, the Bless The Water campaign helped Waterbearers get clean water filters to 8 countries, and this year they are delivering their first systems on US soil, on World Water Day March 22!

Just $50 gets clean water access to 100 people for ten years!

Good morning! My name is Virgil Anderson, and I’m a mesothelioma cancer patient at The National Cancer Institute.

 

14455707_1790354534581867_1171295903_o

 

March 15, 2017

Good morning!

My name is Virgil Anderson, and I’m a mesothelioma cancer patient at The National Cancer Institute.

I was reading through kyusmjparty.weebly.com, and I was hoping you had a minute to check mesothelioma.net. Mesothelioma dot net is the world’s most comprehensive informational site on mesothelioma treatment.

Because of this cancer’s very poor prognosis, our site cover a wide range of therapeutic treatment options, including medicinal marijuana and CBD oils. You can read more at mesothelioma.net/medical-marijuana-mesothelioma/.
In fact, we have over 1000 pages on health therapies alone, ranging from nutritional to naturopathic therapy.

Ultimately, I was hoping you could take a minute to review some of that information and consider consider linking back to our site. If you need additional literature, or would like to hear about other treatment options, please let me know. I’d be delighted to chat.
I applaud your work at kyusmjparty.weebly.com, and I appreciate your time in advance. Anything you can do to help would go a long way.
Hope you’re off to a good start in 2017, and God Bless.
Virgil
Virgil Anderson
Cancer Patient @NCI
Mesothelioma.net

(2017) 60th session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (UNODC)

 

 

Aldo Lale-Demoz

Aldo Lale-Demoz

@AldoLale

UNODC Deputy Executive Director & Director, Division for Operations


unodc.org

60 UNODC


PRESS RELEASE

Alternative development can release farmers from the poverty trap of illicit crop cultivation

 

Vienna, 14 March 2017 – Alternative development can help farmers escape the poverty trap of illicit crop cultivation, but other factors are also involved, the head of UNODC Yury Fedotov said today.

“The transfer of skills and access to land, credit, and infrastructure, as well as marketing support and access to markets, while promoting environmental sustainability and community ownership are all necessary,” he said.

Mr. Fedotov was speaking at an event about alternative development held on the sidelines of the 60th Session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND), organized by Thailand, Germany, Colombia and Peru. Welcoming remarks were delivered by UNODC’s Goodwill Ambassador on the Rule of Law for South East Asia, HRH Princess Bajrakitiyabha Mahidol of Thailand.

Both the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the outcome document of last April’s UN General Assembly Special Session on the world drug problem pointed to the need to overcome the challenge of illicit drugs to achieve the sustainable development goals, said the UNODC Chief.  

UNODC has over 40 years’ experience implementing alternative development programmes and assisting countries in this work. This led, said Mr. Fedotov, to UNODC assisting Thailand and Peru to hold two international conferences on alterative development (ICAD I and II) and develop the UN Guiding Principles on the subject.

Mr. Fedotov underlined the need to strengthen the research and regular monitoring of key indicators to better understand and evaluate the contribution of alternative development to the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.

UNODC’s World Drug report 2015 provided a detailed chapter on alternative development setting out the interplay between development and the challenge of illicit drugs.

Alternative development programmes are aimed at helping to eliminate the cultivation of coca, opium poppy and cannabis by promoting licit farming alternatives and helping to sustain the lives of farmers and their families.

For further information please contact:

David Dadge 
Spokesperson, UNODC 
Telephone: (+43 1) 26060-5629 
Mobile: (+43-699) 1459-5629 
Email: david.dadge[at]unvienna.org

SOURCE LINK


PRESS RELEASE

UNODC Chief sets out global efforts being taken against illicit drugs

 

Vienna, 13 March 2017 – The efforts of UNODC against illicit drugs is helping to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, as well as promote peace and security, UNODC Chief Yury Fedotov told a high-level audience in Vienna today.

“Alternative development is aimed at, not only reducing the cultivation of coca, opium poppy and cannabis, but also improving the socio-economic conditions of marginalized farming communities,” said Mr. Fedotov.

In a video message played at the opening ceremony, the UN Secretary-General António Guterres said: “The Commission led an open and inclusive preparatory process for the UN General Assembly Special Session in 2016. Its unanimous outcome is rich and forward-looking – promising a more comprehensive approach to the world drug problem.” 

Mr. Fedotov used his keynote speech to set out the full range of UNODC’s global efforts against illicit drugs. He pointed to the help being given to countries to bring drug lords to justice, the promotion of cooperation in the justice and health sectors, and UNODC’s support for alternatives to conviction or punishment for minor offences.

UNODC was, he said, working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) on a number of activities, including best practices to treat drug use disorders as an alternative to criminal justice sanctions. HIV/AIDS responses were also being fast-tracked by UNODC, as a UNAIDS co-sponsor, among people who use drugs, and people in prisons. 

Mr. Fedotov was firm in stating that UNODC would continue to help strengthen access to controlled drugs for medical purposes. He said UNODC was raising awareness of this issue through the World Cancer Congress and the UN Task Force on Non-Communicable Diseases.

On the follow-up to last year’s UN General Assembly special session on the world drug problem, Mr. Fedotov said UNODC was focused on the “practical implementation” of the recommendations made in its outcome document. “You may always count on UNODC to help put these approaches into action,” he said.

Mr. Fedotov was speaking at the opening of the 60th Session of the CND.  Speeches were also delivered by the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the United States, Dr. Nora Volkow, the President of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) Werner Sipp, and representatives of youth and civil society. 

The 60th Session of the CND brings together around 1,500 delegates annually representing Member States, inter-governmental organizations, and civil society for a global discussion on the world drug problem. This year, the Commission will discuss 12 draft resolutions, hold around 100 side events and a series of exhibitions.

UN Secretary-General António Guterres Message on the 60th anniversary of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

Remarks of the UNODC Executive Director, Yury Fedotov, at the opening of the 60th Session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

For further information please contact:

David Dadge
Spokesperson, UNODC
Telephone: (+43 1) 26060-5629
Mobile: (+43-699) 1459-5629
Email: david.dadge[at]unvienna.org

SOURCE LINK


The Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) was established by Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) resolution 9(I) in 1946, to assist the ECOSOC in supervising the application of the international drug control treaties. In 1991, the General Assembly (GA) expanded the mandate of the CND to enable it to function as the governing body of the UNODC. ECOSOC resolution 1999/30 requested the CND to structure its agenda with two distinct segments: a normative segment for discharging treaty-based and normative functions; and an operational segment for exercising the role as the governing body of UNODC.  

Commissions

 


 

https://twitter.com/AldoLale/status/832632912705003521/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/AldoLale

http://www.unodc.org/documents/commissions/CND_CCPCJ_joint/Side_Events/2017/Programme_CND_60.pdf

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/press/releases/2017/March/alternative-development-can-release-farmers-from-the-poverty-trap-of-illicit-crop-cultivation.html

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/press/releases/2017/March/unodc-chief-sets-out-global-efforts-being-taken-against-illicit-drugs.html

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/commissions/CND/index.html?ref=menutop

What is “Usable Marijuana”?

Man pleads guilty to having too much medical marijuana

Dabrowskis.jpg

 

By Cole Waterman | cwaterma@mlive.com
Follow on Twitter
on March 14, 2017 at 8:34 AM, updated March 14, 2017 at 8:35 AM

BAY CITY, MI — Nearly two years after police raided their Bangor Township house in search of excessive medical marijuana, a couple’s cases have been resolved with plea deals.

David A. Dabrowski, 65, on Tuesday, March 7, appeared in Bay County Circuit Court and pleaded guilty to one count of delivering or manufacturing marijuana. The charge is a four-year felony.

In exchange, the prosecution agreed to recommend Dabrowski receive a delayed sentence, during which he’d effectively be on probation. If he receives the delay and is successful on it, he’ll be allowed to withdraw his plea and swap it with a guilty plea to misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

The same day Dabrowski entered his plea, prosecutions motioned to dismiss the same felony charge faced by his wife, Sandra K. Dabrowski, 64.

The Dabrowskis, who were arraigned on Sept. 9, 2015, faced trial the day the plea deal was accepted. Their cases date back to April 2015.

What is ‘usable’ pot under medical marijuana law focus in Bay County couple’s prosecution

Whether a Bangor Township couple broke the law by having too much “usable” pot in their medical marijuana growing operation is the point of contention in ongoing legal proceedings.

In a December 2015 preliminary examination, Bay County Sheriff’s Detective Barry Gatza, a member of the Bay Area Narcotics Enforcement Team — or BAYANET — testified he was tasked with investigating an anonymous tip that the Dabrowskis were illegally selling marijuana from their home in the 2900 block of Bangor Road.

He testified that in the early morning of April 27, he pulled two trash bags from a garbage can at the end of the Dabrowskis’ driveway.

“There were several items consistent with marijuana grows that we’ve come in contact with,” Gatza said. Among the items were trimmed marijuana leaves. “It was approximately just under 10 pounds, I believe,” he said.

Gatza obtained a search warrant and later on April 27, approximately a dozen police officers executed it on the Dabrowskis’ property. At the time, David Dabrowski was home selling firearms to two men, Gatza testified. Sandra Dabrowski was not present.

“There were firearms throughout the house,” Gatza testified, adding David Dabrowski is a licensed federal firearms dealer.

Police recovered a large amount of marijuana plants and usable pot, most notably in “the entire basement.” Throughout the house, officers found 96 marijuana plants, 37.7 grams of loose marijuana drying in a basket, and another batch on a table weighing approximately 1,400 grams. Police also found one marijuana plant and marijuana branches in a pole barn, Gatza testified.

In a freezer, police found marijuana oil and several pounds of usable marijuana, Gatza said.

Gatza interviewed David Dabrowski in a BAYANET van, he said. Dabrowski told him he and his wife were medical marijuana caregivers with five patients each.

“Between Sandra and himself, they did co-mingle the plants,” Gatza testified. “They didn’t separate them at all. As far as the daily operations needed to maintain the plants, he did most of the farming on the plants, including Sandra’s.”

Sandra Dabrowski’s jobs included trimming the plants, packaging the crop and setting up purchases, Gatza said David Dabrowski told him.

“He stated that obviously he does provide marijuana to his patients,” Gatza testified. “I think the rate he charges them was $130 an ounce, then he told me he also provides marijuana to people outside his patient list. He charges them $200 an ounce. He said he always makes sure they’re medical marijuana patients, just not his patients. He always makes sure they have a (medical marijuana) card.”

Under the state’s Medical Marijuana Act, patients can have 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana and caregivers can grow up to 12 plants producing 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana for each of their five patients and themselves. With both Dabrowskis being caregivers but only Sandra Dabrowski a patient as well, the couple could legally have a total of 132 plants and 27.5 grams of usable, or processed, marijuana.

Circuit Judge Joseph K. Sheeran is to sentence David Dabrowski at 9 a.m. on Monday, April 17.

CONTINUE READING…

Top 6 Marijuana Bills to Follow

image for article

by Nanette Porter on March 11, 2017

 

Lawmakers have been busy introducing a variety of marijuana bills since the election. While there is no guarantee that any of these bills will actually become laws, a perusal of the bills introduced offers useful insight into how the decisions made regarding cannabis might affect our lives more immediately than the slow churn of Washington, D.C.

In the current political climate, it more important than ever to spend some time getting familiar with these bills. Please click on the links to get more information about each proposed bill. We strongly encourage you to get in touch with your elected representatives to express your views and opinions.

Below are six (6) cannabis-related bills that are worth following closely:

H.R. 975 – Respect State Marijuana Laws Act of 2017

The Rohrabacher-Farr amendment has been law since 2014 and prohibits the Department of Justice from using funds to prosecute individuals who are acting in compliance with a State’s laws. Unfortunately, it was passed and signed into law as part of an omnibus spending package, and to remain legally binding it must be included in the end-of-year spending package for FY2017. The spending restriction is temporary and Congress must act to keep it in place.

California Congressman Dana Rohrabacher has sponsored H.R.975 to limit federal power on marijuana. Rohrabacher is a Republican and professed Trump-guy, but feels the government has become too involved in States’ rights and asset seizures, and believes this is the best way to proceed.

The Rohrabacher-Farr provision comes up for renewal on April 28, and rather than trying to convince the new administration to renew, he says he hopes this paves the way for them to leave it up to the States. If passed by Congress, it will then move to the Senate, and hopefully on to the President’s desk for signature to become law.

H.R. 1227 – Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017

Virginia Congressman Tom Garrett introduced legislation aimed at federally decriminalizing marijuana. H.R. 1227 asks that marijuana be removed from the federal controlled substances list, in essence putting it in the same arena as alcohol and tobacco.

“Virginia is more than capable of handling its own marijuana policy, as are states such as Colorado or California.” – Congressman Garrett

Garrett claims “this step allows states to determine appropriate medicinal use and allows for industrial hemp growth…something that is long overdue. Virginia is more than capable of handling its own marijuana policy, as are states such as Colorado or California.”

H.R. 331 – States’ Medical Marijuana Property Rights Protection Act

Sponsored by California Rep Barbara Lee, H.R.331 seeks an amendment to the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) so as to prevent civil asset forfeiture for property owners due to medical marijuana-related conduct that is authorized by State law.

H.R. 714 – Legitimate Use of Medicinal Marihuana Act (LUMMA)

Virginia Rep H Morgan Griffith introduced H.R. 714 to provide for the legitimate use of medicinal marijuana in accordance with the laws of the various States by moving marijuana from Schedule I to Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act.

The bill also includes a provision that, in a State in which marijuana may be prescribed by a physician for medical use under applicable State law, no provision of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) or the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act shall interfere with such State laws. (This provision is also included in H.R. 715.)

At present, no U.S. healthcare professional can legally prescribe cannabis. Several states have laws on the books that were passed many, many years ago in expectation that federal law would change; but until then, doctors even in these states are legally prohibited from prescribing it. Doing so, would expose medical practitioners to prosecution and loss of his/her license.

H.R. 715 – Compassionate Access Act

Also sponsored by Griffith is H.R. 715. This bill asks for “the rescheduling of marihuana (to any schedule other than I), the medicinal use of marihuana in accordance with State law and the exclusion of cannabidiol from the definition of marihuana, and for other purposes,” and that cannabidiol (CBD), derived from the plant or synthetically formulated and containing not greater than 0.3 percent THC on a dry weight basis, be excluded from the definition of “marihuana.”

The bill also calls for control over access to research into the potential medicinal uses of cannabis be turned over to an agency of the executive branch that is not focused on researching for the addictive properties of substances, and empower the new agency to ensure adequate supply of the plant is available for research. It further asks that research performed in a scientifically sound manner, and in accordance with the laws in a State where marijuana or CBD is legal for medical purposes, but does not use marijuana from federally approved sources, may be considered for purposes of rescheduling.

California AB 1578

California lawmakers quickly got to work and proposed AB 1758, aiming to have California declared as a “sanctuary state” from federal enforcement. If passed and signed into law, state or local agencies would be prevented from taking enforcement action without a court order signed by a judge, including using agency resources to assist a federal agency to “investigate, detain, detect, report, or arrest a person for commercial or noncommercial marijuana or medical cannabis activity that is authorized by law in the State of California and from transferring an individual to federal law enforcement authorities for purposes of marijuana enforcement.”

AB 1758 is pending referral and may be heard in committee on March 21.

30+ bills have been introduced in California since voters approved Proposition 64 in November. Most of these have been submitted to help clean-up the administration and the complex and inconsistencies that exist between the medical and recreational systems.

Support for marijuana legalization is at an all-time high

Cannabis has long-established medical uses as an effective treatment for ailments that include HIV/AIDS, inflammatory and auto-immune diseases, gastro-intestinal disorders, PTSD, chronic pain, and many others.

According to a Qunnipiac poll released February 23, 2017, U.S. voters say, 59 – 36 percent, that marijuana should be legal in the U.S.; and voters support, by a whopping 96 – 6 percent, legalizing cannabis for medical purposes if prescribed by a doctor; and an overwhelming 71 -23 percent believe the government should not enforce federal laws against marijuana in states that have legalized it.

Twenty-eight (28) states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam, either through ballot measure or legislative action, have approved the use of medical marijuana when recommended by a physician. An additional seventeen (17) states have approved use of low THC, high CBD products for medical reasons in some situations.

CONTINUE READING…

When They Try to Bury Us, They Forget That We Are Seeds (Cannabis Culture has a new Editor and Info on Marc & Jodie Emery)

By dankres on March 10, 2017

 

Hi there.

I’m DanKres (pronounced: Dank- Rez). I am the new Editor of Cannabis Culture Magazine. I accept this job with full respect for the effort it demands, the sacrifices made by our movement’s trailblazers and the relentless joy of inclusion in this tribe.

You are all badasses and I am happy to be counted among your numbers.

Yesterday, the office of our magazine and the Pot TV studio was raided by members of the Vancouver Police Department. Production computers were seized, archives breached and the personal laptop of one of my colleagues, stolen.

CCHQ, the head shop next door to our studio, was also raided. The locks were cut from the security gate, the doors forced open and windows obstructed with paper before any of our staff had arrived at work. When the people came to do their jobs, they were forcibly blocked from entry. Police seized files, computers, iPods, and cell phones (many of these taken from the lost & found). Our vapor lounge, a safe space of 18+ public congregation, was also ransacked. Art was removed from the walls, property smashed and in a heartless tragedy, the four cats who live there were traumatized.

No arrests were made in Vancouver, nor were any charges laid. It was a smash and grab. A fear tactic committed by bullies nearly two years after the voting public declared their support for a campaign platform founded on an end to cannabis prohibition. And it happened in a community where 147 people overdosed on prescription opioids last week, 14 of them fatally. These lives were cut short, and perhaps if they had been encouraged to share in the jam nights, yoga and positive vibes of our space some of this loss of life could have been prevented. There are no overdoses at CCHQ, yet the police are too busy displaying their might in a peaceful place to protect or serve those dying in the streets.

The only question now is, why?

As near as I can figure, and the evidence supports it. Their motive is control and compliance with the rules, even after the public has declared those rules obsolete. This is about creating a climate conducive to monopoly and big business. It is not about protecting children from the cannabis boogeyman or discouraging organized crime. It is about branding scarlet letters on all those who do not strictly adhere to the system imposed upon us. Their power was granted by the people, and now the people have realized they were lied to. Prime Minister Trudeau’s post-election victory “hope over fear” statement fuelled headlines nationwide, but through action and inaction, the sentiment has proven as easily dispersed as a puff of smoke exhaled into the high winds of reality.

The attack by the VPD was part of a co-ordinated nationwide politically motivated assault on Cannabis Culture locations in Toronto, Ottawa, and Vancouver. The operation was codenamed “Operation Gator,” and in its wake, our founders, Jodie & Marc Emery, as well as three more peaceful people remain imprisoned in Toronto.

Despite all this, today will be business as usual. Our stores are open. Simple, beautiful tasks and pleasant transactions are being completed by kind people in honor of a commitment to freedom from oppression and support for our brethren in unjust bondage.

There is no shame in what we do and infinite power in our solidarity.

Our history is formative, and our audience of millions of people just like you, are critical thinkers who understand a law is not just simply because it is a law. You are and will continue to be respected in all content published here. This magazine was born to fit the needs of people yearning for relevant information, humorous review and expert analysis of the mystical potentials at play in the Cannabis world.

Under my guidance, this mission statement will remain fulfilled.

Stay lifted,

_D

#freejodie #freemarc #stoptheraids #endprohibition #noprisonforpot

 

CONTINUE READING…


Image may contain: 1 person

 

 


SOURCE LINK


Image may contain: text

SOURCE LINK

 


CANADA—UNITED STATES: MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING ON DRUG ENFORCEMENT

International Legal Materials

Vol. 27, No. 2 (MARCH 1988), pp. 403-409

Published by: American Society of International Law

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20693198

SOURCE LINK

 


 

The DEA is represented in Canada at the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa and at the U.S. Consulate in Vancouver. DEA is the single point-of-contact for drug and drug money-laundering investigations overseas. DEA’s role in Canada is to coordinate international drug-trafficking investigations between the United States and Canadian law enforcement. In addition to illicit narcotics and the laundering of proceeds, DEA also investigates the diversion of legitimate pharmaceuticals as well as precursor chemicals needed to manufacture illicit drugs. Both DEA offices in Canada work with Canadians on a full complement of cases while ensuring that our activities are in keeping with Canadian laws and existing agreements.

SOURCE LINK


News Release
For More Information Contact:
Jeffrey M. Eig
Public Information Officer
Seattle Field Division
206-553-1411
July 29, 2005

Prince of Pot” Arrested by US-Canadian Task Force
Major Distributor of Marijuana Federally Indicted in Seattle, Washington

JUL 29–(Seattle, WA) The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Halifax Police Department arrested MARC EMERY, 47, of Vancouver, BC, today on a warrant issued from the Western District of Washington in Seattle. EMERY is accused of selling millions of dollars of marijuana seeds over the internet, though the mail, and in person to individuals in the United States and across the globe. The DEA, in an investigation of EMERY has traced his seeds to illegal marijuana crops in Indiana, Florida, California, Tennessee, Montana, Virginia, Michigan, New Jersey and North Dakota. An estimated 75% of the seeds EMERY sells are transported to the United States.

SOURCE LINK


https://www.facebook.com/CCMagazineOnline/photos/a.363024903771506.80549.120844721322860/1401334986607154/?type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/CCMagazineOnline/

http://www.cannabisculture.com/content/2017/03/10/try-bury-us-forget-seeds

https://www.facebook.com/marcscottemery

https://www.jstor.org/stable/20693198?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Operation+Gator&tbm=nws&*

Prince of Pot Marc Emery, wife in Toronto court on drug charges

 

Couple who have marijuana shops across Canada charged with drug trafficking, conspiracy, possession

CBC News Posted: Mar 10, 2017 8:07 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 10, 2017 12:52 PM ET

Marc Emery and his wife Jodie Emery were charged on Thursday with drug trafficking, conspiracy and possession after they were arrested at Toronto's Pearson International Airport.

Jodie and Marc Emery, who is known as the Prince of Pot, are in court at Toronto’s Old City Hall today to face drug trafficking, conspiracy and possession charges.

The Vancouver couple were arrested on Wednesday evening at Pearson International Airport while trying to make their way to a marijuana festival in Europe.

Both the Crown and defence have requested time to review possible bail conditions.The court is discussing whether the couple will be granted bail. The justice of the peace presiding over the hearing fell ill and was taken to hospital.

On Thursday, law enforcement officers in three Canadian cities raided various locations of Cannabis Culture, a chain of marijuana shops owned by the Emerys. Jack Lloyd, a lawyer, is representing the Emerys in Toronto.

 

A police news release said the raids were part of Project Gator, “a Toronto Police Service project targeting marijuana dispensaries.”

Three others were also charged, including the owners of the Toronto location of Cannabis Culture.

Marc Emery, 59, has been charged with:

  • Conspiracy to commit an indictable offence.
  • Three counts of trafficking schedule II.
  • Five counts of possession for the purpose schedule II.
  • Five counts of possession proceeds of crime.
  • Fail-to-comply recognizance.

Jodie Emery, 32, has been charged with:

  • Conspiracy to commit an indictable offence.
  • Trafficking schedule II.
  • Possession for the purpose schedule II.
  • Two counts of possession proceeds of crime.

Cannabis Culture raid

A police officer is seen outside the Cannabis Culture location on Church Street in Toronto during a raid on the store. (Emma Kimmerly/CBC)

CONTINUE READING…

Marc and Jodie Emery arrested in Toronto amid marijuana dispensary raids across Canada

Police raid a Cannabis Culture marijuana dispensary in Vancouver, B.C. on March 9, 2017.

 

By Adam Miller Online Journalist  Global News

Marc and Jodie Emery, Canada’s self-proclaimed “Prince and Princess of Pot,” have been arrested in Toronto ahead of coordinated raids at their Cannabis Culture marijuana dispensaries across the country.

The couple’s Vancouver-based lawyer, Kirk Tousaw, said the marijuana activists were arrested at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport Wednesday night and were being held in custody while awaiting bail hearings Thursday.

The Emerys own 19 Cannabis Culture marijuana dispensaries across Canada and Toronto police said Thursday they had executed 11 raids in connection with an investigation targeting the dispensaries — dubbed Project Gator.

Five Cannabis Culture locations in Toronto, one in Hamilton and one in Vancouver were raided and police said a total of five people had been arrested across the country in connection with the investigation.

Vancouver police confirmed to Global News they had raided one Cannabis Culture location in the city in conjunction with the Toronto police investigation. The Ottawa Cannabis Culture dispensary raid was reportedly not connected with the investigation.

Toronto police said they are still determining what charges will be laid, but said search warrants were also executed on two Toronto residences, one in Vancouver and one in Stoney Creek, Ont.

“Make no mistake, this is not about public safety. This is not about protecting the public,” Tousaw said in a statement.

“There is no harm being done by the production and sale of cannabis, for medical or recreational purposes, in storefront dispensaries.”

Marijuana legalization activists Amy Brown and Tracey Curley told Global News outside a Toronto courthouse Thursday they believed the Cannabis Culture locations were being “simultaneously raided.”

“From what we understand, is that various owners of Cannabis Culture franchises are now being arrested,” Curley said.

“Britney Guerra, the owner of Cannabis Culture Hamilton, was just recently arrested at her house in Hamilton.”

Curley said Cannabis Culture franchise owners Chris and Erin Goodwin were also “confronted by police” at the Toronto courthouse while they were waiting to provide bail money for the Emerys.

“They were arrested on site for possession for the purpose of trafficking,” she said. “[We are] a little shocked that it’s happening so fast and so quickly and so many people being affected right now.”

Brown said the arrests of franchise owners were “heartbreaking” but would not affect the operation of the dispensaries going forward.

“The cannabis industry is not going to change. It’s a small bump in the cannabis industry,” she said. “I’m assuming Cannabis Cultures will be back open in the next day or so.”

The Emerys were reportedly travelling to Barcelona, Spain to attend cannabis expo Spannabis, according to a Facebook post by Marc Emery.

Jodie Emery previously said she intended to open her latest location in Ottawa, just steps from the Parliament Buildings.

The 32-year-old recently appeared as a guest on AM980’s The Pulse with Devon Peacock after London Police raided five dispensaries in the city last Thursday.

The raids carried out by London Police took place two days after Bill Blair, former Toronto police chief and current parliamentary secretary to the minister of justice, came to London to visit with police leadership and city officials to discuss a regulatory framework for legalizing marijuana in Canada.

In December, 10 people were arrested by police in Montreal after raids on six newly opened Cannabis Culture dispensaries.

In May 2016, Toronto police raided dozens of marijuana dispensaries in the city, seized hundreds of kilograms of marijuana and laid more than 250 charges under an investigation dubbed Project Claudia.

Toronto police said at the time the raids were due to concerns over the “rapid increase of opening of illegal dispensaries” and the “lack of quality control” that could affect public health and safety.

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