Tag Archives: AG Jeff Sessions

Attorney General Sessions Issues Memo to U.S. Attorneys on the Use of Capital Punishment in Drug-Related Prosecutions

Department of Justice

Office of Public Affairs


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Attorney General Sessions Issues Memo to U.S. Attorneys on the Use of Capital Punishment in Drug-Related Prosecutions

Today Attorney General Sessions issued the following memo to U.S. Attorneys providing guidance regarding the use of capital punishment in drug-related prosecutions:
“The opioid epidemic has inflicted an unprecedented toll of addiction, suffering, and death on communities throughout our nation. Drug overdoses, including overdoses caused by the lethal substance fentanyl and its analogues, killed more than 64,000 Americans in 2016 and now rank as the leading cause of death for Americans under 50. In the face of all of this death, we cannot continue with business as usual.
“Drug traffickers, transnational criminal organizations, and violent street gangs all contribute substantially to this scourge. To combat this deadly epidemic, federal prosecutors must consider every lawful tool at their disposal. This includes designating an opioid coordinator in every district, fully utilizing the data analysis of the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit, as well as using criminal and civil remedies available under federal law to hold opioid manufacturers and distributors accountable for unlawful practices.
“In addition, this should also include the pursuit of capital punishment in appropriate cases. Congress has passed several statutes that provide the Department with the ability to seek capital punishment for certain drug-related crimes. Among these are statutes that punish certain racketeering activities (18 U.S.C. § 1959); the use of a firearm resulting in death during a drug trafficking crime (18 U.S.C. § 924(j)); murder in furtherance of a continuing criminal enterprise (21 U.S.C. § 848(e)); and dealing in extremely large quantities of drugs (18 U.S.C. § 3591(b)(1)). I strongly encourage federal prosecutors to use these statutes, when appropriate, to aid in our continuing fight against drug trafficking and the destruction it causes in our nation.”

Note: To view the signed memo click here.

Topic(s):

Drug Trafficking

Opioids

Prescription Drugs

Component(s):

Office of the Attorney General

U.S. Attorneys (USAO)

Press Release Number:

18 – 339

Updated March 21, 2018

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Marijuana to Stay A Schedule I Drug, Federal Judge Denies Reclassification

Image result for alexis bortell

By Anushree Madappa On 02/27/18

On Monday, a federal judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York dismissed a request to reclassify marijuana — currently a Schedule I drug, leaving the plaintiffs in a limbo after many states have legalized marijuana for medical and recreational purposes.

The plaintiffs — Marvin Washington, Dean Bartell, Alexis Bartell, Jose Belen, Sebastien Cotte, Jagger Cotte, along with the Cannabis Cultural Association Inc. — filed the petition challenging classification of marijuana as a Schedule I drug, hoping that it’s reclassification would pay way for legalization of cannabis across the nation. They sued Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the Department of Justice and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in the federal court.

They petitioners claimed that the “current scheduling of marijuana violates due process because it lacks a rational basis.”

For decades, Marijuana has been under the Schedule I category of the Controlled Substances Act, the highest level of drug classification making it on par with dangerous drugs like heroin. The government has repeatedly rejected appeals for reclassification. The substances in this schedule have “a high potential for abuse,” (2) “no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States,” and (3) there is “a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision.”

Deeming marijuana as a highly dangerous drug, the U.S. Congress proffered the power to reclassify the drug with the attorney general. The power to reclassify was also granted to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), provided the attorney general signs off on the petition to reclassify the drug based on medical and scientific data provided by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The data should be consistent with the argument for reclassification.

While dismissing the petition, which argued that there was no “rational basis” for the Congress to classify Marijuana under Schedule I, Judge Alkin K Hellerstein said, “By framing their claim in terms of the statutory factors outlined in Section 8 l 2(b) (1), plaintiffs’ lawsuit is best understood as a collateral attack on the various administrative determinations not to reclassify marijuana into a different drug schedule.”

“As such, plaintiffs’ claim is barred because plaintiffs failed to exhaust their administrative remedies,” he added.

The “exhaustion rule” generally implies the plaintiffs to go through all parties and exhaust all “administrative remedies” before moving to the federal courts, which the judge found was not followed in the case.

By approaching the federal court, the petitioners chose to avoid the same fate dealt to previous complaints that challenged the administration agency and lost in 2016, the judge said.

In 2016, a request to reclassify marijuana was denied by the DEA. In a letter to the petitioners, the agency said, “HHS concluded that marijuana has a high potential for abuse, has no accepted medical use in the United States, and lacks an acceptable level of safety for use even under medical supervision.”

The federal court judge said he agrees with the previous verdict given by Judge Wolford of the Western District of New York in the United States v. Green case where he said the petition did not challenge the DEA’s decision “to conclude that there is no currently accepted medical use for marijuana” but the constitutional issue is “whether there is any conceivable basis to support the placement of marijuana on the most stringent schedule under the [Controlled Substance Act] CSA.”

In a document stating the verdict, Hellerstein said, “Plaintiffs have failed to state a claim under any constitutional theory, all of plaintiffs’ remaining claims are also dismissed.”

The judge concluded that the “defendants’ motion to dismiss the complaint is granted. Plaintiffs have already amended their complaint once, and I find that further amendments would be futile.”

CONTINUE READING…

RELATED:

Alexis Bortell, 12, Won’t Let Court Loss Stop Jeff Sessions Medical Pot Fight  (1-27-18)

Last year, then-eleven-year-old Colorado resident and medical marijuana patient Alexis Bortell joined other plaintiffs in a lawsuit against pot-hating Attorney General Jeff Sessions over federal scheduling of cannabis. Yesterday, February 26, a judge with the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York dismissed the suit, but Bortell, now twelve, wasn’t distressed. Shortly after the news went public, a post appeared on her Facebook page reading, “We were ready. Smile. We know #SCOTUS [Supreme Court of the United States] is where we are probably going.”   LINK

The note ended with the hashtags #IStandWithAlexis and #AlexisBortell.

http://floridamarijuana.net/breaking-news-jeff-sessions-dea-stand-trial-federal-lawsuit-de-schedule-cannabis/

Trump Administration Battles Sick Kids on Access to Legal Pot

By Erik Larson February 14, 2018, 3:56 PM CST

In a New York courtroom packed with cannabis supporters, the Trump administration urged a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit that aims to pave the way for legal marijuana across the country.

The case was brought on behalf of two sick children, a former National Football League player who says athletes deserve a better way to treat head trauma than addictive opioids and the Cannabis Cultural Association. The suit, filed in July 2017, seeks a ruling that marijuana was unconstitutionally labeled alongside heroin and LSD as a so-called Schedule I drug — the harshest of five government ratings — when Congress passed the Controlled Substance Act in 1970.

In court on Wednesday, Justice Department attorney Samuel Hilliard Dolinger said the plaintiffs didn’t follow legal requirements before suing, beginning with a petition to the Drug Enforcement Agency.

“The right thing is to defer to the agency,” said U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein, an 84-year-old who was nominated by former President Bill Clinton, who famously admitted to experimenting with pot while claiming he “didn’t inhale.”

Cannabis legalization has gained momentum in states, even with an unfriendly face in the U.S. Attorney General’s office. Nine states and Washington, D.C., allow adults to use the plant as they wish. More than one in five people can legally eat, drink, smoke or vape, according to state regulations. Twenty additional states have legalized pot for medicinal use.

Trump Interrupts Marijuana’s Path From Taboo to Legit: QuickTake

Hellerstein said he would issue a ruling later, and it was far from clear which way he was leaning. The judge, who had the courtroom erupting in laughter on more than a few occasions during the hearing, was skeptical of the government’s claim that there’s no medical benefit to marijuana.

“Your clients are living proof of the medical effectiveness of marijuana,” Hellerstein said to the plaintiffs’ lawyer, Michael Hiller.

The legal cannabis industry is predicted to reach $50 billion in sales by 2026, up from $6 billion in 2016, according to investment bank Cowen & Co. Still, the industry is rife with risk. Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded in January the Obama-era policies that ushered in legalization in many states.

The lawsuit has some star power with plaintiff Marvin Washington, who played for the New York Jets. He joined the case because the Controlled Substance Act made him ineligible for grants under the Federal Minority Business Enterprise program, which he planned to use for his medicinal cannabis business.

The suit also highlighted the human toll of the federal government’s war on marijuana with young plaintiffs whose lives have been saved or improved by cannabis, including 11-year-old Alexis Bortell of Colorado and seven-year old Jagger Cotte of Georgia.

Bortell’s epileptic seizures were brought under control by cannabis after her family moved from Texas to Colorado so she could legally use it in that state, according to the suit. Cotte, who suffers from Leigh’s Disease, was able to treat excruciating pain with medicinal marijuana and prolong his life by two years beyond his maximum prognosis, according to the suit.

The complaint notes that American presidents from George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to John F. Kennedy and Barack Obama have smoked pot. It also claims the Nixon administration was motivated by ulterior motives when it pushed for the Controlled Substance Act.

Cannabis was criminalized “not to control the spread of a dangerous drug, but rather to suppress the rights and interests of those whom the Nixon Administration wrongly regarded as hostile to the interests of the U.S. — African Americans and protesters of the Vietnam War,” the suit says.

At the hearing, Hellerstein said that argument wasn’t going to work with him.

The decision “will not depend on what may have been in the mind of Richard Nixon at the time,” Hellerstein said.

— With assistance by Jennifer Kaplan

CONTINUE READING…

Court hears challenge to federal marijuana laws

Trial begins for advocates suing Sessions and the DEA over …

ALEXIS BORTELL V. JEFF SESSIONS; FEBRUARY 14, 2018 AT 11:00AM.

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, outdoor
Why risk everything in court instead of moving to Vancouver without a fight? This. This is medical cannabis. This is us. I am one of millions of faces not ‘the one face’. In two days they have to listen to ALL of us. I will go to the Supreme Court if I have to. #IStandWithAlexis . #AlexisBortell
Alexis Bortell

56 mins ·

Hearing is now moved up to 11 a.m. tomorrow. Please let everyone know. Thanks!

#IStandWithAlexis

Alexis Bortell

July 25, 2017 ·

JEFF SESSIONS SUED IN LANDMARK LAWSUIT CHALLENGING THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT

“Beleaguered” Attorney General Jeff Sessions was named a defendant today in a federal lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the Controlled Substances Act as it pertains to Cannabis/Marijuana. In a 90-page Complaint, attorneys representing five plaintiffs maintain that the CSA, in classifying Cannabis as a “Schedule I drug,” is so irrational that it violates the U.S. Constitution.

In their Complaint, plaintiffs demonstrate that the Federal Government does not, and could not possibly, believe that Cannabis meets the definition of a Schedule I drug, which is reserved for the most dangerous of substances, such as heroin, LSD and mescaline. By way of comparison, cocaine and crystal meth are considered Schedule II drugs and are thus considered less addictive and less dangerous.

To be classified under Schedule I, a drug: (i) must have a high potential for abuse; (ii) must have absolutely no medical use in treatment; and (iii) cannot be used or tested safely, even under strict medical supervision. The plaintiffs point out that the Federal Government knows that Cannabis does not meet these requirements, especially given that, among other things, the Federal Government: (a) obtained its own medical patent based upon the Federal Government’s assertion that medical Cannabis is a safe and effective treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and HIV-induced dementia (among other conditions); (b) established a national policy to refrain from investigating and/or prosecuting medical Cannabis businesses and users in the 29 States and three other areas under American jurisdiction (including Washington, DC) that have legalized Cannabis for medical and/or recreational use; (c) provided instructions, through issuance of the FinCen Guidance, on how financial institutions can bank Cannabis business; and (d) admitted that Cannabis does constitute medicine, including through statements by the U.S. Surgeon General and a Federal Administrative Law Judge.

“The record makes clear that the CSA doesn’t make any rational sense, and the Federal Government knows it,” says Michael Hiller, lead counsel in the case. Hiller went on to explain that, “if the Federal Government doesn’t believe in the rationality of its own statute, it’s unconstitutional to enforce it.”

Among the other claims in the lawsuit are that the CSA: (i) was enacted and implemented in order to discriminate against African Americans and to suppress people’s First Amendment rights; and (ii) violates plaintiffs’ constitutional Right to Travel.

The plaintiffs include:

• retired professional football player and Super Bowl Champion, Marvin Washington, who desires, but is ineligible (due to the CSA) to obtain grants under the Federal Minority Business Enterprise program, to open a business that would allow professional football players (among others) to treat with medical Cannabis to reduce opioid dependency and addition;

• an 11-year old girl, Alexis Bortell, who moved to Colorado from Texas so that she could treat her intractable epilepsy with medical Cannabis;

• a six-year old Georgia boy suffering from Leigh’s Disease, Jagger Cotte, who has been using medical Cannabis to lengthen his life and control his otherwise excruciating pain;

• disabled military combat veteran Jose Belen, who uses medical Cannabis to control his post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); and

• the Cannabis Cultural Association, whose membership includes many People of Color who contend that the CSA was enacted and has been enforced in a discriminatory manner, rendering them unable to participate in, among other things, the Cannabis industry.

Lauren Rudick, a member of Hiller’s firm representing Cannabis businesses, observed that, at present, “more than 60% of Americans live in a jurisdiction in which medical Cannabis is legal.” She also remarked that a “4/20/2017 Quinnipiac poll found that over 90% of Americans support the use of medical Cannabis – and it’s near impossible to get 90% of the Country to agree on anything.” These numbers led Joseph Bondy, a federal criminal defense attorney and legalization advocate working as co-counsel with the Hiller firm on this case, to “question the agenda of those who continue to push for enforcement of the CSA, given its unlawful and discriminatory impact and that so few in America support such an effort.”

The defendants in the case are Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Acting Administrator of the DEA Chuck Rosenberg, the Justice Department, the DEA and the Federal Government. Co-counsel David Holland, a litigator and longtime advocate for legalization of Cannabis, noted that the “the efforts to criminalize Cannabis are relatively recent and were largely underwritten by racial and ethnic animus.” As reflected in the Complaint, African Americans and other Persons of Color are four times as likely to be arrested under the CSA than white Americans, even though Cannabis is used equally by People of Color and Caucasians.

Contact: Michael S. Hiller (212) 319-4000 x. 308 and (646) 408-5995
Lauren Rudick (212) 319-4000 x. 319 and (917) 405-4206
Joseph Bondy (646) 335-3988
David Holland (212) 842-2480 and (917) 861-2678

#ForAllPatients #AlexisBortell
*Picture Originally shared by Mr. Clark.

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CONTINUE READING AND TO SOURCE

Video:  Girl taking medical marijuana sues Jeff Sessions and DEA

ALEXIS

https://mjbizdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/ECF-Version-of-Complaint.pdf

Kathy Inman

Kathy Inman Great Work!!⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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Rick Donaldson

Rick Donaldson Alexis, would it be of any benefit to get more people to sign on with these attorneys, to increase the sound/impact of this suit ?

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Jared Jennings

Jared Jennings Do you have a link to the initial or amended complaint? I’d love to read it.

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Alexis Bortell

Alexis Bortell It is on the Pacer system for New York courts we are told.

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Loretta SBuster

Loretta SBuster I love y’all im a Texan illegally trying to heal….

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Samantha Macaluso

Samantha Macaluso You’ve brought me to tears of joy! So happy that there’s a group of people willing to take a stand! I am praying for your continued healing with cannabis and for your lawsuit! May GOD be with you every step of the way!

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Crystal Ramos

Crystal Ramos She stands for freedom and for us all thank you Alexis

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Trevor J Jacovino

Trevor J Jacovino You’ve got so much support Alexis!!! Keep up the good fight, we are here for you!!!

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Pat Warren

Pat Warren WOW !!! the courage of an innocent child …… we should all take lessons from Alexis …..

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Leslie Henson Lindsey

Leslie Henson Lindsey How the crap can you place a patent on a plant. ? God owns all the “patents “

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Michele Ruscitti

Michele Ruscitti Here we go!!! Let’s hope they stay the coarse get all this foolishness out of the way!

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Cindy Ann Trimble

Cindy Ann Trimble God gave us the garden and all within it!

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Pamela Bourque

Pamela Bourque Alexis for president!

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Teddy Vas

Teddy Vas Way to go Alexis!!! God Bless you!!!!!!!

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Jordan Watts

Jordan Watts Huge step toward legalization!

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Kristy Nicole Hendricks

Kristy Nicole Hendricks Go Alexis Go!!! ~hugs from your hometown in Rowlett

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Steve Minton

Steve Minton Ha ha, another nail in the coffin of quivering theocratic fascist and stone-cold racist Jeff Sessions. Trump’s earliest supporter, he’s now finding out the hard way that if you play with the fire of an abusive psychopath like Trump, and defy the will of the people, you get burned.

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Mark Redhawk Nelson

Mark Redhawk Nelson Government and fda has zero control of herbs. Thats why there isnt a huge market for them. And they dont usually command a premium. But there is money to be made. And they have a criminal institution to prifit from. They dont want to lose tgier inco…See More

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David Smith

David Smith How do I get in on this as a plaintiff – to recoup all the money and stress damages from having to move my elderly mom to live with me in CA, where I am a patient, because of Texas prohibition?

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Annette Anderson

Annette Anderson Alexis Bortell, I am so proud of all the great things you have already accomplished and look forward to the amazing things from you in the future. Would love to meet a fellow Texan MMJ refugee but either this us you have planned, you’ll be very busy. I…See More

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Amber Michaels

Amber Michaels I’m with you Alexis!!!!! I may have epilepsy too which more and more docs think I do but to get to Denver to see a neurologist is gonna be the downside!!!! Gotta have a babysitter and got to have a car that’s been checked out before going the drive!!!!…See More

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Elaad Teuerstein

Elaad Teuerstein Good luck with the lawsuit. It’s about time the world got rid of this rediculous ban on MJ. It’s not just the US that tightly controls use of the plant but most countries around the globe have followed suit out of fear of confronting the US about it or…See More

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Terry Odom

Terry Odom Good luck in the fight. It’s such a screwed up system. The government is completely irrational in their logic. And , seriously, it’s always been here, they’re not ever going to eliminate it. Total waste of time, resources, and lives.

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Krizzy Carter

Krizzy Carter Alexis, I have finally moved back to TX and am finally home. My biggest wish is that you can be too one day. All the love and support… from Plano! ❤️

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Ben Morris

Ben Morris Your family is brave and inspiring. Any way to get cannabis legal federally and give access to medicine for kids should be celebrated

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Karen Lockwood

Karen Lockwood Awesome! Alexis, you’ve got a lot of people on your side of this issue. Let the battle begin!! Keep us minions updated, we’ll do whatever it takes to support this battle and fight for the win!

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Michelle Williams

Michelle Williams GOOOOOOO, ALEX!!! Giv’em hell girl!!!
I was living in Plano when u and ur family lived in Frisco, and then made the heartbreaking decision to leave friends, family, ur school to move to Colorado. Ive been with u since then! I commend ur bravery and pray one day this will all be a fading memory!!! Keep up the avocation and I’ll definitely be behind u will ALL my support!!!

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Sharon J. Tucker

Sharon J. Tucker My family and friends all support medical cannabis. We all have family and friends in desperate need of medical cannabis. We are tired of begging for this much needed medicine. Veterans too.

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Clarke Bohorfoush

Clarke Bohorfoush Alexis!! Our prayers are with you and you have our full support!! You’re an incredibly brave young lady and your courage will change this country and the world!!

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Samantha Macaluso

Samantha Macaluso Everyone please reach out to Sessions before his meeting on Thursday with DEA! Your voice matters!!!https://www.justice.gov/contact-us

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Casey Langham

Casey Langham Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness….. this plant represents all of these things …. thank you for fighting the good fight

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Darcelia Coleman Haney

Darcelia Coleman Haney Get ’em! Politics having way to much power regarding medicinal use.

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William Joey Dorsett

William Joey Dorsett I hope we win, I hope they end up having to pay, having the rescedual, and having to release people from jail…

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Suzanne Wall

Suzanne Wall Thank you! I am praying for God to give victory to all of you!! Us!!

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Emma Lee

Emma Lee You go girl!! All it takes is one strong will to change the world We’re all behind you cheering!

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J D Goodwin

J D Goodwin Children of the cannabis are coming for you Jeff…be very afraid.

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Jason McCathern

Jason McCathern Ya I knew ole Jeff Sessions was gonna be trouble for us weed smokers from the get-go!

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Belle Shildmyer

Belle Shildmyer

Tenor

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Rob Taft

Rob Taft Sign me up www.420central.org is behind you

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Pat Trahan

Pat Trahan If you need help please post. Good for you, many thanks!

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Shirley McNeal

Shirley McNeal You go Alexis, send them back to school so you can teach them a little more

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Mary Hartman

Mary Hartman The fact that there is even a prescription drug named Marinol negates the fourth paragraph!

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Ingrid Joiya-Warrick

Ingrid Joiya-Warrick FANTASTIC! This should slow Sessions happy ass up until Trump dumps him.

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Rob Paulk

Rob Paulk jeff.sessions. wud die from brain cancer if he only had a brain

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Luis Castellanos Padilla

Luis Castellanos Padilla Fight the good fight
Alexis, Wisconsin,God,&90%of Americans,are with you,!!!

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Adam Cericola

Adam Cericola Wow Alexis Bortell go get em! Prayers for you and your family.

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D Ronald Dudding Jr.

D Ronald Dudding Jr. Bob Goodlatte won’t get on board with nothing but heartless politicians we are seeing a change in Virginia his approval rating has dropped and that’s my opponent in 2018

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Lisa Reichenbach

Lisa Reichenbach What an amazing girl you are! Thank you from so many of us to you and your family for all that you are doing!

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Alexis Bortell

8 hrs ·

It is almost time. Tomorrow is our day. All of us…
I am not suing for money. All I want is freedom to live my life where I want and for the government to get out of MY way. We are standing against medical tyranny. http://ow.ly/Q3tz30in80R #IStandWithAlexis #AlexisBortell

Lawsuit Takes Aim at Trump Administration Marijuana Policy

In a sprawling complaint citing the benefits of pot reaching back 10,000 years, the suit seeks to decriminalize the drug under federal law.

nytimes.com

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James Meissner

James Meissner U go Alexis Bortell !! #WakeUpWorld #LifeOverLaw #EndTheWarOnPeople #EndTheDrugWar #OnePlant united! Its time!

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Robyn James

Robyn James When we have to fight the government, to treat our illness with a plant, the government is corrupt and needs to be overthrown!! Taking our power back one trial at a time!

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Alexis Bortell

51 mins ·

Hearing is now moved up to 11 a.m. tomorrow. Please let everyone know. Thanks! #IStandWithAlexis

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Penny Webb Ransom

Penny Webb Ransom Will have you and the others in my thoughts and prayers.
Tom McCain will peach-tree norm be following this or GA care?

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Robin Hurshman

Robin Hurshman Praying for you Alexis! We will be there with in spirit! Much love and support for such a strong young lady.

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Alexis Bortell

Yesterday at 9:50am ·

Why risk everything in court instead of moving to Vancouver without a fight? This. This is medical cannabis. This is us. I am one of millions of faces not ‘the one face’. In two days they have to listen to ALL of us. I will go to the Supreme Court if I have to. #IStandWithAlexis . #AlexisBortell

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Kyle Young

Kyle Young Two more days I will be praying for you Alexis. AG Sessions needs to eat his words and do what the American People WANT!!!

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Denise Chuck Schrader

Denise Chuck Schrader because marijuana should be the American peoples right…. it shouldn’t have anything stopping anyone that has tried it and it has helped…. #yougotthisgirl #IStandWithAlexis

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Alexis Bortell shared their post.

Yesterday at 6:27am ·

2 more days until our day in Federal Court! Here is the original post with the two images if people want to change their profile picture to show support for the case.

Many Alexis Bortell page friends will be there and we advise people to arrive early as it is going to be busy.

We have heard there are no phones or cameras allowed in the court room but we haven’t spoken to the courthouse security directly yet to confirm. If someone confirms first, please let us know.

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Alexis Bortell added 2 new photos.

February 5 at 12:06pm ·

Here are two images people can use if they want to as their profile pictures to support our case and the hearing on Feb 14th. Your support means a lot to all o…

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Randy Carter

Randy Carter

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Dan Drouin

Dan Drouin I do hope they at least allow TV cameras in there

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Alexis Bortell

Alexis Bortell In front they will

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Alexis Bortell shared OneLuv Organics‘s post.

February 11 at 8:36am ·

I get asked by lots of people if they can sell our soaps in their businesses. Yes, you can and we put a post out about it this morning on our OneLuv Organics page.

Quick summary: You can email support@oneluvorganics.com subject “Reseller” and we will send you details .

It is very easy.

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OneLuv Organics

February 11 at 8:22am ·

Three questions we get often are:

1. How do we join your reseller program and is it hard to join?
To join, email support@oneluvorganics.com subject “Reseller …

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Sheree Krider

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Alexis Bortell

February 10 at 11:58am ·

By using code ‘HHLEX’ you save $10 per bottle of Haleigh’s Hope (they make my medicine) and they donate to my ‘Patches of Hope’ feed the hungry program. This has already raised almost $400 for Patches of Hope. Thanks! http://ow.ly/h0Gl30ik6ig My Soap Store: http://ow.ly/j9gG30ik6eJ

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Sheree Krider

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Alexis Bortell

February 10 at 9:37am ·

4 more days and WE WILL have our day in federal court. Article: http://ow.ly/JER830ik184 Attached is the form with the court information if you want to attend. They are expecting LOTS of people inside and outside the courthouse because it is open to the public. #IStandWithAlexis

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Netha Morgan

Netha Morgan Alexis, gold star mother here, all of our ancestors that have gone before us including my son specialist David John Badie U.S.ARMY(k.i.a.8/1/08) are with you stand strong along with all of those Warriors they will hold you they will guide you and they will help to kick sessions ass good luck my little sister

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Alexis Bortell

Alexis Bortell Thank you.

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Jennifer Leigh Scott

Jennifer Leigh Scott So my son is 12, this is what I’m gonna need from you. I’m gonna need you to marry my son when you grow up because I cannot imagine having a more bad ass daughter in law than you! ❤️
#IstandWithAlexis
#MyIdol

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Alexis Bortell

Alexis Bortell Um, lol.

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Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks to the National Sheriffs’ Association

Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks to the National Sheriffs’ Association

Washington, DC

~

Monday, February 12, 2018

Remarks as prepared for delivery.

Thank you, Jonathan, for that kind introduction.  It’s good to see you again.  I also want to recognize Greg Champagne of St. Charles, Louisiana.
Before I say anything else, I have to acknowledge, with great sadness, that we lost two police officers this weekend.  Officers Anthony Morelli and Eric Joering of Westerville, Ohio were shot to death around noontime Saturday.  Between them they had nearly 40 years of law enforcement service.  I want to join with President Trump in offering my condolences to their families at this difficult time.
It is an honor to be with you this morning.  The National Sheriffs’ Association is one of the biggest law enforcement groups in America—with more than 20,000 members and 75 years of history.
I want to thank you for what you do.  I’ve heard about how you’ve trained more than 1,000 law officers in using narcan—an overdose reversal drug.  You’ve donated thousands of narcan kits across 21 different states.  I’m told that you’ve already reversed hundreds of overdoses. 
I’m pleased to see that my home state of Alabama is well-represented here. We have 14 Alabama sheriffs with us this morning, as well as the long time Executive Director of the Alabama Sheriffs Association, Bobby Timmons.  Thank you all for keeping Alabama safe.
On behalf of President Trump, I am here to say thank you to everyone here for your service to this country.
I know that many of you have met with the President.  You know that he is a strong supporter of law enforcement.
This is an administration that listens to you and that understands this community.  We understand the risks you take and the tools you need to be effective.
I know that sometimes in the past, you haven’t had the support that you deserve.  You’ve had politicians tie your hands with ineffective policies or fail to understand the challenges your deputies face and fail to respect the impact of their work and service.
Let me say this loud and clear: President Trump and I are proud to stand with all of you.
The most important thing that any government does is keep its citizens safe.  The first civil right is the right to be safe.
Too often, politics gets in the way of that mission.
Right now, we’re trying to confirm a number of important component heads at the Department of Justice.  That includes a new head of our Criminal Division, our Civil Rights Division, and our National Security Division.  These are critically important components—and outstanding nominees.  Our nominee to lead the National Security Division was approved unanimously in committee.  But because of one senator’s concerns over unrelated political issues—like legalizing marijuana—we can’t even get a vote.
I’m Attorney General of the United States.  I don’t have the authority to say that something is legal when it is illegal—even if I wanted to.  I cannot and will not pretend that a duly enacted law of this country—like the federal ban on marijuana—does not exist.  Marijuana is illegal in the United States—even in Colorado, California, and everywhere else in America.
 
We need our nominees confirmed.  Safety and security are just too important.
Those of gathered here know that protecting the safety and security of the American people is the mission we share.
President Trump understands that law enforcement officers are not the problem—they’re the solution.
I know firsthand the important work that each of you do.  I was a federal prosecutor for 14 years, and during that time, I was blessed to partner every day with federal, state, and local law enforcement officers to protect people’s rights.  We might have been a small U.S. Attorney’s office in Mobile, Alabama, but we worked closely with our Sheriffs and took tons of drugs off our streets, dismantled domestic and international fraud schemes, and we prosecuted civil rights offenders to the fullest extent possible.  There is nothing I am more proud of that noble work.
I know that each of you has that same kind of satisfaction as your serve your people.
You are the thin blue line that stands between law-abiding people and criminals – between sanctity and lawlessness.  You protect our families, our communities, and secure our country from drugs and violence.  The people of this country appreciate what you do.  Last summer, Gallup released their annual poll, which showed that overall confidence in the law enforcement rose significantly last year.  That is a testament to the work you do every day.
I’m not sure if you all saw this, but there was a survey recently that showed that more and more of our young people want to go into law enforcement.  According to the survey, it used to be the number 10 dream job for kids under 12.  Now it’s number three overall—and for boys it’s number one.  Athletes dropped while more and more want to wear the badge.
That tells me that we’re doing something right. I have been hearing law enforcement leaders express grave concerns about recruitment, maybe we have turned the corner.
It was largely because of officers like you that crime went down in this country for 20 years. It was a long and historic crime decline, murder rates declined by one half and teen use of drugs declined by half.
But over the past two or three years, the country and some leaders lost their focus that led to progress and our work became more difficult. The result: The violent crime rate went up by nearly seven percent from 2014 to 2016.  Robberies went up.  Assaults went up nearly 10 percent.  Rape went up by nearly 11 percent.  Murder shot up by more than 20 percent.  Meanwhile we have suffered the deadliest drug crisis in American history.
I don’t think it was a coincidence that violent crime and drug abuse rose at the same time. I was just reading one of our Department-funded studies that found that nearly a quarter of the increase in homicides is the result of the increase in drug-related homicides.
And that should be no surprise: drug trafficking is an inherently violent business.  If you want to collect a drug debt, you can’t file a lawsuit in court.  You collect it by the barrel of a gun.

But as we all know, violent crime statistics and drug overdose rates are not numbers—we’re talking about moms, dads, daughters, spouses, friends, and neighbors.
We will not stand by and watch violence and addiction rise.  Plain and simple, we will not allow the progress made by our women and men in blue over the past two decades to simply slip through our fingers.  We will not cede one community, one block, or one street corner to violent thugs or poison peddlers. We will protect the poor as well as the rich.
As Attorney General, I am committed to combatting violent crime and supporting your work.  I have made it one of our top priorities.
The day I was sworn in as Attorney General, President Trump sent me a simple, straightforward executive order: reduce crime in America.  Not preside over ever-increasing crime rates.  Reduce crime in America.
At the Department of Justice, we embrace that goal.  And you and I know from experience that it can be done.
Some people don’t think it’s possible, but crime rates aren’t like the tides.  Strong law enforcement and prosecutions can bring them down.
It is our goal to bring down violent crime, homicides, opioid prescriptions, and overdose deaths.  These are the explicit goals we’ve established.
And over the past year, we have taken action to reach these goals.  In 2017, the Department of Justice brought cases against the greatest number of violent criminals in a quarter of a century.  We charged the most federal firearm prosecutions in a decade.  We also arrested and charged hundreds of people suspected of contributing to the ongoing opioid crisis.
We secured the convictions of nearly 500 human traffickers and 1,200 gang members, and worked with our international allies to arrest or charge more than 4,000 MS-13 members.
MS-13 didn’t like that, by the way.
  The Assistant Director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division recently testified before Congress that the MS-13 gang leaders back in El Salvador have taken notice of these efforts.  They know that hundreds of their members are now behind bars.  So now they’re trying to send younger and more violent gang members to the United States to replenish their depleted ranks.  But they will not succeed.
That’s one more reason that we are no longer allowing so-called “sanctuary” jurisdictions to nullify federal immigration law if they want to receive our law enforcement grants.
It’s not that we want to de-fund these cities and states.  We want them to rethink their policies and start to cooperate with federal law enforcement. I cannot send funds to jurisdictions who won’t meet minimum standards of partnership.
I know that this issue is important to this organization, and I want to thank you for the work that you have done.
I was in Florida last week to discuss our ongoing opioid crisis, and I had the chance to meet with a number of Florida sheriffs.
In working with the National Sheriffs Association, seventeen Florida sheriffs have worked out an agreement with ICE to help them take criminal aliens out of the Sunshine State.  Aliens held by these sheriffs are held under color of federal authority—and that protects these sheriffs from being sued just for doing their jobs.
I want to encourage more of these agreements across America.
By definition, removing criminal aliens from our communities makes us safer. And I want you to consider joining the very effective 287(g) program.
We are already starting to see positive signs of the Trump administration’s approach to crime.  In the first six months of last year, the increase in the murder rate slowed significantly and violent crime actually went down.  Publicly available data for the rest of the year suggest we may see further progress.
These are major accomplishments that benefit the American people.  And we could not have realized them without you—without a strong partnership between our federal team and our state and local law enforcement personnel.
Based on my experience meeting with officers like you, I believe that morale is already up among our law enforcement community. I can feel the difference.  And we have good reason to be encouraged.
Any loss of life is one too many, but it is encouraging that the number of officers killed in the line of duty declined last year and reached its second lowest level in more than half a century.  That’s something that we all should celebrate and be thankful for.
At the Department of Justice we appreciate the service of every single federal agent.  But we are well aware that 85 percent of law enforcement is state, local, and tribal.  Yours are the deputies that have the critical street-level intelligence regarding the criminal element.  Federal officers have the unique capability to follow a case across state borders and even across national borders.  We can reach defendants all over the world.
We want to be a force-multiplier for you.  Our work is most effective when experienced state and local investigators are paired with the resources and expertise of the 15 percent that are our federal law enforcement.
That’s why we have reinstated our equitable sharing program at the Department of Justice.  Civil asset forfeiture is a key tool that helps law enforcement defund organized crime, take back ill-gotten gains, and prevent new crimes from being committed.  It weakens the criminals and the cartels.  Civil asset forfeiture takes the material support of the criminals and makes it the material support of law enforcement. In departments across this country, funds that were once used to take lives are now being used to save lives. And there is nothing wrong with adoptive forfeitures. There can be no federal adoption if the forfeiture is not called for under federal law. In many cases, adoptive forfeitures represent great partnerships between federal and state law enforcement.
Criminals should not be permitted to profit from their crimes.
Sheriff Eavenson has been a long-time advocate for this approach, and we’re grateful for his valued advice.

Helping law enforcement do their jobs, helping the police get better, and celebrating the noble, honorable, and challenging work of our law enforcement communities will always be a top priority of President Trump and this Department of Justice. Indeed, his first executive order to us on my first day was to back the men and women in uniform.
Together we can do this.  We can bring down crime and give every American peace of mind.
I want to close by reiterating my deep appreciation and profound thanks to all the women and men of law enforcement – federal, state, local, and tribal.  I want to thank every sheriff in America. Since our founding, the independently elected Sheriff has been seen as the people’s protector, who keeps law enforcement close to and amenable to the people. The Sheriff is a critical part of our legal heritage.
The work that you do – that you have dedicated your lives to – is essential.  I believe it.  The Department of Justice believes it.  And President Trump believes it.
You can be certain about this: we have your back and you have our thanks.

Speaker:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Component(s):

Office of the Attorney General

Updated February 12, 2018

SOURCE LINK

DeKalb father sues AG Jeff Sessions over marijuana

Christopher Hopper, WXIA 11:45 PM. EDT July 27, 2017

A DeKalb County father is suing the federal government, namely Attorney General Jeff Sessions over marijuana.

Sebastien Cotte, Stone Mountain, is named in a federal lawsuit filed Monday, July 24 in a U.S. District Court in Manhattan challenging the Controlled Substances Act.

Cotte has a 6-year-old son Jagger who suffers from a terminal neurological disorder called Leigh’s Disease.

Cotte has been giving Jagger cannabis oil for nearly three years and believes it has extended his life.

“Usually 95 percent of them do not make it past 4-years-old,” said Sebastien Cotte, suing the federal government.

In September Jagger will turn seven.

Around the time most kids die from this chronic disease, Cotte moved his family to Colorado and Jagger started cannabis oil.

He no longer takes oxycontin or morphine.

“It’s been game changing for him it’s one of the main reasons he’s still alive today,” he said.

Cotte said marijuana’s medical benefits are keeping Jagger alive, and that’s why he’s a plaintiff in this lawsuit.

Browser does not support iframes.

It’s 90 pages long and is against Attorney General Jeff Session and the federal government for classifying marijuana in a category with heroin and LSD, highly addictive drugs with no accepted medical use.

Cocaine and methamphetamine are Schedule II drugs and are considered less addictive and dangerous compared to marijuana.

Cotte said that Schedule I status is what’s keeping Georgian’s who can legally use cannabis oil from being able to buy marijuana grown here.

“To be able to get it here in Georgia, get a safe legal tested product here in which we could get if cannabis wasn’t a Schedule I substance, that would be life changing for Jagger and thousands,” he said. “You know we have over 2,000 people on the registry right now.”

There are several plaintiffs in the lawsuit in addition to the Cotte’s including a former NFL player and a combat veteran with PTSD.

PDF DOCUMENT OF LAWSUIT HERE

CONTINUE READING / VIDEO…

AG Sessions paves way for stricter sentencing in criminal cases

By Laura Jarrett, CNN

Updated 7:54 AM ET, Fri May 12, 2017

(CNN)Attorney General Jeff Sessions has a new directive for federal prosecutors across the country: charge suspects with the most serious offense you can prove.

Friday’s announcement follows a line of several other significant departures from Obama-era domestic policies at the Justice Department, but this decision crystalized Sessions’ position in the criminal justice realm.

In a brief one-and-a-half-page memo, Sessions outlined his new instructions for charging decisions in federal cases, saying that his new first principle is “that prosecutors should charge and pursue the most serious, readily provable offense.”

    “The most serious offenses are those that carry the most substantial guidelines sentence, including mandatory minimum sentences,” Sessions later adds.

    While the federal sentencing guidelines are advisory — and take into account everything from a defendant’s criminal history to cooperation with authorities — some judges have felt handcuffed by mandatory minimums, which provide a statutory sentencing minimum of months below which the judge cannot depart.

    The move was harshly criticized by the New York University School of Law Brennan Center for Justice, a nonpartisan law and policy institute focused on democracy and justice.

    “The Trump administration is returning to archaic and deeply-flawed policies,” Inimai Chettiar, the center’s justice program director, said Friday. “Sessions is leaving little to no room for prosecutors to use their judgment and determine what criminal charges best fit the crime.”

    “That approach is what led to this mess of mass incarceration,” she added. “It exploded the prison population, didn’t help public safety, and cost taxpayers billions in enforcement and incarceration costs.”

    Sessions also formally withdrew a signature part of Attorney General Eric Holder’s “Smart on Crime” initiative, which sought to target the most serious crimes and reduce the number of defendants charged with non-violent drug offenses that would otherwise trigger mandatory minimum sentences.

    “We must ensure that our most severe mandatory minimum penalties are reserved for serious, high-level, or violent drug traffickers,” Holder wrote in a 2013 memo. “In some cases, mandatory minimum and recidivist enhancements statutes have resulted in unduly harsh sentences and perceived or actual disparities that do not reflect our Principles of Federal Prosecution.”

    As a result, during the Obama era, federal prosecutors were instructed not to charge someone for a drug crime that would trigger a mandatory minimum sentence if certain specific factors were met: (a) the relevant conduct didn’t involve death, violence, a threat of violence or possession of a weapon; (b) the defendant wasn’t an organizer, leader or manager of others within a criminal organization; (c) there were no ties to large-scale drug trafficking operations; and (d) the defendant didn’t have a “significant” criminal history (i.e., prior convictions).

    All of those charging factors are now gone under Sessions’ reign and not surprising, as he has previously telegraphed his desire to prosecute more federal cases generally.

    The effects of Friday’s decision are likely to be felt most immediately in the narcotics context where federal mandatory minimums established by Congress can be harsh for even first-time offenders because the sentences are dictated based on drug type and quantity.

    CNN’s Eugene Scott contributed to this report.

    CONTINUE READING…