Tag Archives: canada

#FREEDAREN DAREN MCCORMICK IS OUT!

He’s out!

Here is the latest update on #FREEDAREN !!!

Released with “conditions” today!

Here is a live video of his release, thanks to EAST-CanadaFriends !

Daren OUT

Daren is out 9.11.17

Free Daren outside courthouse pt. 3

He’s out!

Updates to follow!

RELATED:

“I think I had an undercover Cop in my driveway yesterday”…

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“I think I had an undercover Cop in my driveway yesterday”…

If you didn’t already know him, meet Daren McCormick

He lives in Nova Scotia Canada and is one of “Canada’s new oilmen”.

He heals the sick, illegally.

He is prosecuted, illegally.

He has and is being detained in an Amherst facility, most likely illegally, as no signed search warrant was produced before his arrest.

The following is the information which I have been able to collect about the ongoing situation.  There will be updates as they are available and I urge you to visit the included links for more in-depth information.

His garden was destroyed.

But he is NOT!

FREEDAREN

“…they were antique guns…”

There are many people on both sides of the border that are watching the developments here.  The East Canada Friends Group was created on Facebook to let people follow the information forthcoming and show their support.

I have spoken with Donna Thibodeau and Kevin James by messaging.  They are both following this case closely and will forward updates as needed.

Kevin James, founding member of Canadian Medical Marijuana Association,  has been a promoter of Rick Simpson and RSO from the beginning.  He was also involved with the Marijuana Party of Canada in Ontario during 2003.  He also works with Americans for Cannabis. 

Donna Thibodeau is a avid follower and patient of Daren as well.  She is doing all she can to help the situation.  This morning she sent this message to me concerning his last appearance in Court:

“I almost put charges on the first prosecutor, if they didn’t remove him.  They changed prosecutors for the afternoon.  I told them that he made me feel creepy and uncomfortable.  Daren has a pending case on both of them.  The head drug unit was also in the room and is also on Daren’s list…”

Additionally, this was posted yesterday:

Brendan Quinlan

Yesterday at 2:48pm ·

Just got of the phone with Daren Mccormick …The cops will not let him have his law books or for him to see the Warrant to see witch house it was for…The cops raided his home and his Mothers House

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#FREEDAREN

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“I think I had an undercover Cop in my driveway yesterday”…

These were the last words that I heard from Daren McCormick before I found out that he had been arrested and his Cannabis garden destroyed on August 23rd.

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Daren McCormick was growing medicine to try to help save people from Cancer in Nova Scotia, Canada.  He had been successful quite a few times and has patients that will testify to the fact to prove it.

He was a member of Phoenix Tears, a Rick Simpson group out of Nova Scotia Canada.

He was/is a grower.  A grower who believes in the healing power of Cannabis and has spent his adult life fighting for this cause and being persecuted for it.  Yet he does not give up.

Right now, as he sits in a Amherst, Nova Scotia jail awaiting Court with no bond set as of yet, his followers are watching fervently to see what is going to happen next.

Federally, Cannabis is a legal commodity in Canada IF you are a patient – which the plants that Daren was growing was definitely for patients! 

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“He was going to people with hemp oil, not charging anybody for nothing, and saving people’s lives,” Albert Dwyer said.

Dwyer said he suffered from colon cancer and used marijuana oil in place of radiation and chemotherapy with positive results. According to Dwyer, McCormick’s arrest was keeping medicine from those who need it.

“Why should they put someone in jail who’s saving people’s lives,” Dwyer said. LINK

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CURRENT CANADIAN CANNABIS LAWS

The following is a summary of the case that Daren McCormick has filed against Justice Moir for his previous 3 1/2 imprisonment :

EAST-Canada friends The following is a summary of the negligence of Justice Moir of the Supreme Court in Nova Scotia, Canada. Full copies of the direct examination can be found on the website at the bottom. Specific pages that support the allegations are listed by allegation number, volume and page at the end.
Mr. Moir had an unusual case before him involving a person in Canada who had a different belief system. Mr. Moir, while he sat on the bench and made decisions involving this self-represented individual (SRI), was willfully or negligently blind to his responsibilities.
During the trial, Mr. Moir observed several problems, and his response to each calls into question his capacity to fulfill his office.
1. Disclosure was given up to the final moments before trial. Furthermore, the SRI had limited ability to read the disclosure. Finally, the SRI had not finished reviewing the disclosure. Mr. Moir responded to these issues by ignoring them, and continuing with the trial.
2. The SRI attempted to introduce a defence of Officially Induced Error, but did not have the background in law to distinguish Officially Induced Error from Entrapment. Mr. Moir responded to this by helping support this mistake, and by explaining that entrapment was a process taken upon appeal. Further, he made several claims that if he saw an error, he would stop the proceedings himself.
3. Mr. Moir reviewed case law on the SRI and his group prior to hearing from the SRI at trial, and Mr. Moir claimed to have decided on several issues he suspected he would hear. (Due to issues, the PDF containing the main support for this may not be uploaded.)
4. The SRI brings to Mr. Moir’s attention on several occasions that the arrest was made without a warrant, and the police arrested the SRI with drawn firearms. Mr. Moir ignored these repeated remarks, and neither addressed them in open court properly or in a voir dire (a different sort of court hearing).
The evidence on arrest, if excluded, would have negated the evidence in several charges. Based on the case law and facts of the warrantless arrest, there appeared to be a good chance of success in challenging the arrest and evidence taken at the arrest if Mr. Moir had acknowledged the existence of the issue.
From the time the police claim to have made the decision to arrest the SRI, they applied for and were given a search warrant for the SRI’s father’s home. The claim that the decision was made to arrest the SRI is contradicted by police documents. This begs the question of why they did not also apply for an arrest warrant. Furthermore, based on the behavior of the SRI immediately prior to arrest, there did not appear to be any reason to arrest the SRI.
5. The SRI, when asked if he was prepared to stand trial, stated that he was not ready. This was due to an inability to review disclosure sufficiently and due to new disclosure being received ten minutes before the trial. Mr. Moir proceeded with the trial regardless.
6. During jury selection, Mr. Moir challenged a juror on behalf of the SRI, and without consent from the SRI.

For other public services offered by POLS and the PDFs to support the above, please see here:
https://www.patreon.com/POLS
References (volume and page)
DE(*) stands for Direct Examination(volume letter). For example, DE(A) 12 is Direct Examination A PDF page 12.
1. Disclosure issues:
i) DE(A) 7,84
ii) DE(C) 264, 266
iii) DE(F) 824, 871-872, 891,
iv) DE(G) 1066
v) DE(J) 1568
vi) DE(K) 1873
2. Officially Induced Error:
i) DE(D) 533
ii) DE(K) 1782
3. Predetermines Matters Before the Court:
I) DE(F) 950 (This is a small example. Due to issues, the main support cannot be uploaded)
4. Warrantless arrest:
i) DE(A) 50-60, 1,
ii) DE(B) 121-125, 127
iii) DE(C) 264, 266, 361
iv) DE(D) 444, 477
v) DE(F) 803, 823, 835
vi) DE(G) 1144-1145
vii) DE(J) 1609, 1681-1682, 1700
viii) DE(K) 1879, 1913
5. Not Prepared to Stand Trial:
i) DE(A) 14
6. Jury Selection Issue:
i) DE(A) 28
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This is the story of a man who gave away Cannabis Oil (later to be known as RSO or Phoenix Tears). Daren was charged and was sentenced to 3 1/2 years in prison the day after this video was made. Daren is out of prison now, and despite having done hard time, is back in full production and continuing to grow cannabis and help those in need.  CLICK ON PICTURE BELOW!

The charges are as follows, according to cumberlandnewsnow.com :

McCormick is charged with:

•   Production of marijuana

•   Possession of marihuana for the purpose of trafficking

•   Possession of a restricted firearm with ammunition

•   Eight counts of unsafe storage of a firearm

•   Eight counts of unauthorized possession of a firearm

•   Eight counts of possession of a firearm knowing possession is unauthorized

•    Two counts of possession of a firearm while prohibited.

Daren has never been charged with a violent crime with a firearm to my knowledge.

In other words, there was no need to charge him with firearms violation except for the fact that they weren’t legal for him to have in possession. HOWEVER, as a person who lives in the country around a bunch of farmers, I KNOW that it is NECESSARY that anyone who is growing any kind of crops whether it be corn, potato’s, hemp or cannabis – needs to have access to a firearm! So in my opinion those charges are bogus – he is not a violent person and should not be treated as such! 

No one should lose their right to possess a firearm because of a violation of the law unless it is a violent offense

Please take the time to read about what is going on in Canada.  The “legalities” of legalization are overwhelming.  At any time you can become a target for arrest.  For growing a plant!  The same thing is happening here.  The only chance we have to be a free people is to insist upon REPEAL of the regulations and Statutes that have been enacted – just to enslave us.

With that, I will leave you with this famous quote:

Kissinger: “Control oil and you control nations; control food and you control the people.” US strategy deliberately destroyed family farming in the US and abroad and led to 95% of all grain reserves in the world being under the control of six multinational agribusiness corporations LINK


There are a number of informative links that I have included for your convenience.  It’s a long story…


Phoenix Rising Series: Webisode, 1 (The Story of Rick Simpson and RSO) A film by Chris Harrigan LINK



http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/cj-jp/marijuana/law-loi.html

https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&q=rick+simpson+arrested+by+dea+&oq=rick+simpson+arrested+by+dea+&gs_l=psy-ab.3..33i160k1l2.11124.31434.0.33392.31.26.0.0.0.0.552.4082.0j5j6j2j1j1.15.0….0…1.1.64.psy-ab..16.14.3892.6..0j35i39k1j0i131k1j0i131i67k1j0i67k1j0i20k1j33i22i29i30k1._wwek-lu7Bc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_history_of_cannabis_in_Canada

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4br_6V-LScc

http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/news/2017/8/28/supporters-of-marijuana-advocate-protest-outside-amherst-courtho.html

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10159185925730361&set=a.10150348531565361.578995.587095360&type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/MsKellysGrapevine/photos/a.753547831494063.1073741833.746569962191850/753547811494065/?type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/MsKellysGrapevine/photos/a.753547831494063.1073741833.746569962191850/753547811494065/?type=3

http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/news/2017/8/28/supporters-of-marijuana-advocate-protest-outside-amherst-courtho.html

http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/news/2017/8/28/supporters-of-marijuana-advocate-protest-outside-amherst-courtho.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ghPyUFlS9A      LISTEN TO THIS VIDEO – IT CONTAINS IMPORTANT INFORMATION!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhpeMZ0Utvw  INFORMATION ABOUT RICK SIMPSON AND PHOENIX TEARS STORY.

http://phoenixtears.ca/

http://investmentwatchblog.com/kissinger-control-oil-and-you-control-nations-control-food-and-you-control-the-people-us-strategy-deliberately-destroyed-family-farming-in-the-us-and-abroad-and-led-to-95-of-all-grain-reserves/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freemen_on_the_land

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That’s right you can buy the oil at the dispensaries made famous by Daren and the other Phoenix Tears members for about $70 a gram, but try giving it away for free…watch the video. Also for more on Daren you can follow this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4br_6…

opheucus

Published on Aug 29, 2017

Canadian man, and my friend, arrested for saving lives with cannabis oil.

#FREEDAREN

#GODBLESSTHEACTIVISTS

smk

Pot Was Flying Off the Shelves in Uruguay. Then U.S. Banks Weighed In.


Pot Was Flying Off the Shelves in Uruguay. Then U.S. Banks Weighed In.

By ERNESTO LONDOÑOAUG. 25, 2017

A line outside a pharmacy selling legal marijuana last month in Montevideo, Uruguay. Credit Matilde Campodonico/Associated Press

The pharmacies selling pot were doing a brisk business.

After Uruguay became the first country in the world to fully legalize marijuana sales for recreational use last month, some of the pharmacies struggled to keep up with the demand.

Then came the stern letters from American banks.

The letters immediately sent officials in Uruguay scrambling to make sense of the Patriot Act and other American laws that could doom an essential part of their country’s new marijuana market.

American banks, including Bank of America, said that they would stop doing business with banks in Uruguay that provide services for those state-controlled sales.

Afraid of losing access to the American banking system, Uruguayan banks warned some of the pharmacies over the last couple of weeks that their accounts would be shut down, potentially signaling a broader international impasse as other countries, including Canada, set out to legalize marijuana.

“We can’t hold out false hope,” President Tabaré Vázquez of Uruguay told reporters this week, adding that his administration was trying to come up with a solution.

Uruguay’s Marijuana Law Turns Pharmacists Into Dealers JULY 19, 2017

The snag mirrors challenges that such businesses have faced in American states that have legalized medical and recreational cannabis. Under the Patriot Act, which was passed weeks after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, it is unlawful for American financial institutions to do business with dealers of certain controlled substances, including marijuana. The provisions were designed to curb money laundering and drug trafficking.

American banks, including Bank of America, said they would stop doing business with banks in Uruguay that provide services for the country’s state-controlled marijuana sales. Credit Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Obama administration indicated in 2014 that banks were unlikely to face penalties for offering services to marijuana businesses in states where the trade is legal, as long they screened accounts for signs of money laundering and ensured that customers followed state guidelines. This enabled some of the businesses to get accounts at credit unions, but major banks have largely stayed away from the expanding industry, concluding that the burdens and risks of doing business with marijuana sellers were not worth the hassle.

“Banks are businesses, and they can pick and choose who they do business with,” said Frank Robison, a lawyer in Colorado who specializes in marijuana regulation. “From a banking industry perspective, the marijuana industry might be perceived as a flea on a dog’s back.”

Several pot businesses in states like Colorado and Washington — the first to legalize recreational marijuana — have opted to remain cash-only businesses. Others have found small banks willing to take a calculated risk.

But finding a workaround in Uruguay may be hard. Sales of marijuana represent a small share of business for pharmacies, which are currently the only merchants licensed to sell it, and the pharmacies say they need banking services to operate.

Similarly, bankers in Uruguay will probably find it much more important to remain in good standing with American financial institutions than to preserve the accounts of a small number of pharmacies.

The threat of losing their bank accounts has led some of the roughly 15 pharmacies that initially signed up to participate in the new market to give up on marijuana sales, said Pablo Durán, a legal expert at the Center of Pharmacies in Uruguay, a trade group. Twenty other pharmacies that were expected to join the market are holding off while the government explores solutions, he said.

The American regulations are counterproductive, supporters of the legal market in Uruguay contend, because they may inadvertently encourage, not prevent, illicit drug sales.

Fighting drug trafficking was one of the main reasons the Uruguayan government gave for legalizing recreational marijuana. Officials spent years developing a complex regulatory framework that permits people to grow a limited supply of cannabis themselves or buy it at pharmacies for less than the black market rate. Lawmakers hoped that legal structure would undercut illicit marijuana cultivation and sales.

“There probably isn’t a trade in Uruguay today that is more controlled than cannabis sale,” Mr. Durán said.

As a candidate, President Trump said that American states should be free to chart their own courses on marijuana, and he promised to pare back regulation in the financial sector. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, however, has been a sharp critic of legalization and has compared marijuana to heroin.

Now, some members of the cannabis industry wonder whether the United States government will resolve the conflict between its banking laws and the expanding patchwork of measures to legalize recreational and medical marijuana use around the world. The guidance from the Obama administration, issued by the Justice and Treasury Departments in a pair of memos in 2014, addressed the matter domestically but not for international banking.

“Uruguay may be the tip of the iceberg,” said Mr. Robison, the Colorado lawyer who specializes in marijuana regulation.

Pharmacists in Uruguay were incredulous to learn that their bank accounts could be shut down, considering the years of study and planning that preceded the start of retail marijuana sales last month. The country’s marijuana law was passed in 2013.

“We can’t understand how the government didn’t have the foresight to anticipate this,” said Gabriel Bachini, a pharmacy owner in the coastal city of Colonia.

Buying marijuana in a pharmacy in Montevideo. Credit Andres Stapff/Reuters

Since sales began, the number of registered buyers in Uruguay has more than doubled. As of Aug. 15, more than 12,500 people had enrolled in a system that verifies customers’ identities with fingerprint scanners and allows them to buy up to 40 grams per month (at a price of about $13 for 10 grams, enough for about 15 joints, advocates say). Under the law, only Uruguayan citizens and legal permanent residents are allowed to buy or grow marijuana.

“Demand has been very strong,” Mr. Bachini said. “People are thrilled that they no longer have to go to private homes or venture out into neighborhoods” to get marijuana.

In emailed statements, the Treasury and Justice Departments said that their earlier guidance was still being applied. But banking and legal experts say the Trump administration has yet to lay down clear markers on this area of policy.

Officials in Uruguay are hopeful that American lawmakers will pass legislation allowing banks to do business with marijuana sellers in states and countries where it is regulated. Representative Ed Perlmutter, Democrat of Colorado, introduced a bill in April that would do that, but marijuana advocates say they do not expect a prompt legislative change.

“It is ironic that laws aimed at fighting drug trafficking and money laundering have created a roadblock for a system that intends to do just that,” said Hannah Hetzer, an analyst at the Drug Policy Alliance, which supports decriminalization of marijuana. “Uruguay is creating a legal market that displaces the illicit marijuana market.”

Mr. Bachini, the pharmacist, said he had not yet heard from his bank. But if it threatens to shut down his account, he said, he will not think twice about giving up marijuana sales.

“This pharmacy has been around for 30 years,” he said. “I’d just stop until this issue with the United States is resolved.”

Correction: August 26, 2017

An earlier version of this article misidentified the state that Ed Perlmutter represents in the House. It is Colorado, not Oregon.

Mauricio Rabuffetti contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on August 26, 2017, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Uruguay’s Legal Pot Is Imperiled by U.S. Banks. Order Reprints| Today’s Paper|Subscribe

Continue reading the main story


Shannon Dugas of “The Couch” Radio Show interviews Tim Allen, member of Phoenix Tears

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Above is a link to the full official version of the Documentary “RUN FROM THE CURE”, released January 28, 2008.

On June 11th, Shannon Dugas, Host of “The Couch” Radio Show, interviewed Tim Simpson, long time neighbor, advocate and friend of Rick Simpson.

It is a very interesting and informative show and I urge everyone to take the time to listen to it.

This week we are truly humbled to have Tim Allen from Phoenixtears. He has some very important information that he wants to share with all of us.

HERE IS A DIRECT LINK TO AUDIO OF SHOW USING IE

 

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Above:  Shannon Dugas and Co-Host Erica Sinden

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Above:  Tim Allen

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http://phoenixtears.ca/

https://epsilon.shoutca.st:2197/ondemand/dcn/Replay%20The%20Couch%20June%2011%202017.mp3

https://business.facebook.com/dunet.ca/?business_id=466135496872213&ref=page_internal

https://www.facebook.com/tim.allen.1675

https://www.facebook.com/ricksimpsonofficial

http://phoenixtears.ca/rso/video-library/

https://www.youtube.com/user/RickSimpsonOilCure/videos

https://business.facebook.com/dunet.ca/?business_id=466135496872213&ref=page_internal

http://www.dunet.ca/thecouch.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDJX7GqsQoA

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Why Canadian marijuana companies are going public in 2017

Submitted by Marijuana News on Fri, 06/09/2017 – 08:45

The marijuana market in Canada is prepped for additional growth: several companies plan to go public in 2017 since the country’s regulations are more favorable, giving investors more options in this growing sector.

Companies are choosing to file their IPOs in Canada because of the more restrictive environment in the U.S., said Michael Berger, founder of Technical420, a Miami-based company that conducts research on cannabis stocks, and a former Raymond James energy analyst. The legal cannabis market expanded significantly during the past year and medical marijuana is now legal in countries such as Australia, Germany, Canada, Uruguay and Colombia.

By 2018, Canada’s legal recreational cannabis market should generate over $10 billion a year.

“One theme we recognized over the last year is an increasing number of companies listing on Canadian stock exchanges,” he said. “These companies are choosing to list in Canada due to better business policies.”

The number of registered patients is growing at a rapid pace in Canada as licensed producers continue to find innovative ways to create value for its shareholders. The number of patients is nearly 200,000 and growing 10% on a month over month basis, Berger said. The liquidity in the market is also beneficial for investors.

“In Canada, companies can use bank accounts, claim taxes, and write off business expenses legally unlike the U.S. where cannabis companies cannot do any of that and are frequently switching banks on account of their account being closed due to the focus on the cannabis industry,” he said.

The Canadian marijuana market and legislation is outpacing the U.S. because Canada has legalized medicinal and recreational marijuana on the federal level, said Jason Spatafora, co-founder of Marijuanastocks.com and a Miami-based trader and investor known as @WolfofWeedST on Twitter.

“Canada has allowed licensed producers of cannabis to take their companies public in a meaningful way compared to the U.S. since there are still American companies which do not touch the plant directly,” he said.

The Next Canadian Cannabis IPOs

A medical cannabis producer, The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings, is planning to go public in the second half of 2017, said Berger. The company cultivates medical marijuana under Health Canada from a 100-acre farm in Ancaster, Ontario and has already completed two oversubscribed financing rounds with over 2,500 investors, “which is a testament to the company’s leadership and success,” he said.

One factor investors need to consider is the track record of the management team and The Green Organic Dutchman has “one of the best in the industry,” Berger said. “The management team has a proven track record and they were the team that brought together OrganiGram (OGRMF) and Emblem Corp. (EMMBF), two successful Canadian licensed medical cannabis producers. Although the team’s role with those companies was different, they learned invaluable lessons which have also been implemented in this company.”

Compared to its competitors, the company has differentiated itself by growing organic cannabis and is levered to a market that is experiencing a 10% on a month-over-month basis on sales.

“The Organic Dutchman is part of a rapidly growing market, generates a strong balance sheet and consists of several strategic partners,” he said.

High Street Capital Partners, a New York-based real estate company that owns and operates cannabis cultivation facilities and dispensaries in 14 states across the U.S., could go public by the summer.

Although High Street is levered to the U.S. market, the company plans to list in Canada due to better regulatory environment. The company is an attractive opportunity since it has over 60% of the market share in Maine, 11 dispensaries in Illinois, one of the largest dispensaries in the Boston area and other attractive and profitable locations, said Berger.

Based in Ontario, CannTrust, a federally regulated licensed medical cannabis producer, is also planning to go public on the TSX this year. The company is an “attractive” opportunity, because it brings more than 40 years of pharmacy and healthcare experience to the cannabis industry. The company offers various proprietary products, operates out of a 40,000-square foot state-of-the-art hydroponic facility and its lab conducts testing and research on their products.

Risks in Cannabis Stocks

The risk of investing in IPOs for retail traders can be high, especially if they are not familiar with the industry since it is a nascent sector.

“For traders like myself IPOs are only interesting to me if they’re in an emerging market or if as a private company they have solved a problem or created a revenue generating efficiency,” said Spatafora. “IPOs do help fund innovation occasionally on a global sense, but they also pull liquidity from sectors and break hearts such as Snapchat.”

The most recent Canadian company to go public was medical producer Emblem Corp. (EMMBF), which went public on the TSX Venture Exchange in December 2016.

“This offering was nothing short of success,” said Berger. “Retail accredited investors purchased shares at $0.75 and $1.15 before the IPO. Once the shares commenced trading, Emblem was trading above the $3 level.”

Although the cannabis market is burgeoning, some newcomers could wind up not being profitable for several years. Choosing the winners is not always an exact science. Investors should be wary and conduct due diligence since popular stocks are not always profitable.

“Cannabis is an emerging market and as an investment it is a once in three generation opportunity that is barely through its first inning,” Spatafora said. “Just like dot com investors needed to pick their spots to invest in, people should not make just any marijuana investment.”

Investing in an early stage company is often riskier, said Berger.

“While the cannabis industry is the fastest growing industry in the world, leaning to an influx in the number of cannabis companies going public, we have seen several highly anticipated IPOs not live up to expectations and burn through its working capital before being able to deliver on its promises,” he said. “Investors need to look into the company’s balance sheet and determine if it has enough capital to execute on its plan and to make sure its deploying capital to the right places and not on management’s salaries.”

CONTINUE READING…

Trudeau’s Legal Marijuana Could Produce A Problem At Border

legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s plans to legalize marijuana could make for longer lines at the U.S. border. Former U.S. ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman thinks legal pot in Canada — illegal in the U.S. — could mean more searches with dogs trained to detect cannabis in vehicles.

Heyman, an appointee of former president Barack Obama, told CTV News that he was tasked with examining the potential effect of legalized marijuana on border security while he was ambassador from April 2014 until the inauguration of President Donald Trump in January. He specifically noted the role of sniffer dogs in the detection process.

“The dogs are trained to have reactions to certain scents. Some of those scents start with marijuana. Others are something that are significantly more challenging for the border. But the dog doesn’t tell you this is marijuana and this is an explosive,” Heyman said.

“The dog reacts, and these border guards are going to have to appropriately do an investigation. That could slow the border down.”

Heyman noted that once the dogs are trained to detect the presence of marijuana it is a skill that stays with them for life. So new dogs would have to be introduced.

Heyman noted that longer line-ups as a result of slower security checks would have a ripple effect on trade as it would be more time-consuming, costly and aggravating to move products and produce across the border. He said that is just one more variable to influence the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that Trump apparently thought he could unilaterally dismantle without first consulting Congress.

“He’s threatened all throughout the campaign that he was going to tear up NAFTA,” said Heyman. “That was a very clear and repetitive dialogue that he’s had all through the campaign. It was only at one day, at one time, where he used the word tweak… So I think that was the exception, the tweak, rather than what was being consistently communicated.”

Heyman remains optimistic about overall U.S.-Canadian relations despite the increasing volume of the trade threats.

“I don’t think the differences are any bigger now than they were before. I think the language being used is different now,” he said.

Canadian Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says the federal government is aware of the potential for longer waits at border crossings as a consequence of legal pot.

Responding to questions from CTV News, Goodale press secretary Scott Bardsley said a secure but flexible border remains vital to trade because “400,000 people and $2.4 billion in trade cross our shared border every day. Both countries recognize the importance of an efficient and secure border for our shared prosperity.”

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CONTINUE READING…

Ahead of marijuana legalization, activists call on feds to forgive past pot offences

Travis Lupick on April 12th, 2017 at 11:23 AM

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The federal Liberal government is expected to table legislation to legalize recreational marijuana on Thursday (April 13), exactly one week ahead of the world’s annual 4/20 celebration of all things cannabis.

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The proposed law will be debated in Parliament. Then it’s likely that each province and territory will require some time to work out regulatory details.

In the meantime, long-time advocates for marijuana reform want to know if Ottawa has any plans to provide relief on past offences.

Just last month, Canada’s most prominent marijuana advocates, Jodie Emery and her husband, Marc, were charged with conspiracy to commit an indictable offence, possession for the purpose of trafficking, and possession of the proceeds of crime.

In a telephone interview, Jodie said that once the new laws come into effect, she wants the federal government to look at expunging records of crimes that are no longer crimes.

“We should have amnesty, pardons, and an official apology from the government,” she told the Straight.

Other advocates have made similar calls.

“A great way for Justin Trudeau to show leadership on cannabis would be to announce amnesty for simple possession when tabling new law,” Victoria lawyer Kirk Tousaw posted in an April 11 message on Twitter.

At the same time, Jodie painted a bleak picture of how she predicts the Liberals’ regulatory framework for marijuana will work.

“We know the government will not apologize for prohibition because we know they intend to maintain it,” she said. “The form of legalization that they are going to put forward is really just an economic opportunity for a select few people while everybody else continues to be arrested….Growers and dispensaries will continue to be criminalized and they will introduce even tougher penalties for people operating outside the legal system.”

The Straight asked Justin Trudeau about amnesty at a campaign stop in Vancouver in August 2015.

“That’s something that we’ll be looking into as we move forward,” he said. “There has been many situations over history when laws come in that overturn previous convictions, and there will be a process for that that we will set up in a responsible way.”

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Canada takes action to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis

News Release

From Health Canada

Proposed legislation would provide regulated and restricted access to cannabis and crack down on impaired driving

April 13, 2017              Ottawa, ON      

                                                           Government of Canada

The current approach to cannabis does not work. It has allowed criminals and organized crime to profit, while failing to keep cannabis out of the hands of Canadian youth. In many cases, it is easier for our kids to buy cannabis than cigarettes.

That is why the Government of Canada, after extensive consultation with law enforcement, health and safety experts, and the hard work of the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation, today introduced legislation to legalize, strictly regulate and restrict access to cannabis.

The proposed Cannabis Act would create a strict legal framework for controlling the production, distribution, sale and possession of cannabis in Canada. Following Royal Assent, the proposed legislation would allow adults to legally possess and use cannabis. This would mean that possession of small amounts of cannabis would no longer be a criminal offence and would prevent profits from going into the pockets of criminal organizations and street gangs. The Bill would also, for the first time, make it a specific criminal offence to sell cannabis to a minor and create significant penalties for those who engage young Canadians in cannabis-related offences.   

In addition to legalizing and strictly regulating cannabis, the Government is toughening laws around alcohol- and drug-impaired driving. Under the Government’s proposed legislation, new offences would be added to the Criminal Code to enforce a zero tolerance approach for those driving under the influence of cannabis and other drugs. Additionally, the proposed legislation would authorize new tools for police to better detect drivers who have drugs in their body.

Subject to Parliamentary approval and Royal Assent, the Government of Canada intends to provide regulated and restricted access to cannabis no later than July 2018.

The Government will invest additional resources to make sure there is appropriate capacity within Health Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canada Border Services Agency and the Department of Public Safety to license, inspect and enforce all aspects of the proposed legislation. These additional resources will also allow the Government to undertake a robust public awareness campaign so that Canadians are well informed about the dangers of driving under the influence of cannabis and other drugs.

Working in partnership with provinces, territories, municipalities and local communities, the Government will also make appropriate investments to train and equip law enforcement so that Canada’s roads and highways are safe for all Canadians.

In the months ahead, the Government will share more details on a new licensing fee and excise tax system. It will also continue to engage with all levels of government and Indigenous Peoples.

Quotes

“As a former police officer, I know firsthand how easy it is for our kids to buy cannabis. In many cases, it is easier for our children to get cannabis than it is to get cigarettes. Today’s plan to legalize, strictly regulate and restrict access to cannabis will put an end to this. It will keep cannabis out of the hands of children and youth, and stop criminals from profiting from it.”
Bill Blair
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

“Today, we are following through on our commitment to introduce comprehensive legislation to legalize, strictly regulate and restrict access to cannabis and to create new laws to punish more severely those who drive under its influence. The Cannabis Act reflects an evidence-based approach that will protect Canadians’ public health and safety. By tackling alcohol- and drug-impaired driving with new and tougher criminal offences, Canadians will be better protected from impaired drivers and the number of deaths and accidents on our roads will be reduced.”
The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould
Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

“The bills we propose today are aiming at putting drug dealers and organized crime out of the cannabis business. It will allow law enforcement to focus on other serious offences, including the distribution of cannabis to children and youth and driving under the influence of drugs. Drug-impaired driving puts the lives and the safety of drivers and passengers at risk every day, and we will lead a wide-ranging campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of driving while impaired. The proposed Bill will also provide more tools and stronger laws to punish more severely drivers who drive under the influence of drugs, including cannabis. We will continue to work with our law enforcement, provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders to develop a consistent enforcement approach and to provide support in building capacity across the country.”
The Honourable Ralph Goodale
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

“The Cannabis Act will help keep our children safe and address the health risks associated with cannabis. The proposed legislation would allow Canadian adults to possess and purchase regulated and quality-controlled cannabis products, while prohibiting sales to young Canadians and any products, promotion, packaging or labelling that could be appealing to young people.”
The Honourable Jane Philpott
Minister of Health

Quick Facts

  • The Cannabis Act proposes that legal sales of cannabis would be restricted to people who are 18 years of age and over. Provinces and territories could increase the minimum legal age of sale, purchase and consumption.
  • The movement of cannabis and cannabis products across international borders would remain a serious criminal offence.
  • Following Royal Assent, the Government intends to bring the proposed Act into force no later than July 2018. At that time, adults would legally be able to possess up to 30 grams of legal cannabis in public, and to grow up to four plants per household at a maximum height of one metre from a legal seed or seedling. Until the new law comes into force, cannabis will remain illegal everywhere in Canada, except for medical purposes.
  • The provinces and territories would authorize and oversee the distribution and sale of cannabis, subject to minimum federal conditions. In those jurisdictions that have not put in place a regulated retail framework, individuals would be able to purchase cannabis online from a federally licensed producer with secure home delivery through the mail or by courier.
  • The proposed legislation would amend the Criminal Code to modernize and simplify the transportation provisions, strengthen the criminal law responses to impaired driving, and facilitate the effective and efficient investigation and prosecution of drug- and alcohol-impaired driving.
  • To facilitate detection and investigation of drug-impaired driving, law enforcement officers will be authorized and equipped to use oral fluid drug screeners at the roadside.

Related Products

– 30 –

Contacts

David Taylor
Office of the Minister of Justice
613-992-4621

Media Relations
Department of Justice Canada
613-957-4207
media@justice.gc.ca

Andrew MacKendrick
Office of the Minister of Health
613-957-0200

Media Relations
Health Canada
613-957-2983

Scott Bardsley
Office of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
613-998-5681

Media Relations
Public Safety Canada
613-991-0657
media@ps-sp.gc.ca

Public Inquiries:
613-957-2991
1-866 225-0709

SOURCE LINK

Toronto dispensaries once owned by the Prince of Pot will all shut down this weekend

A former Cannabis Culture location, renamed the Village Dispensary, on Church Street will close its doors this weekend.

 

After police raids, former owner Jodie Emery says government is clearing way for legal producers

CBC News Posted: Apr 07, 2017 11:20 PM ET Last Updated: Apr 08, 2017 10:20 AM ET

The last of the former Cannabis Culture dispensaries in Toronto, once synonymous with Marc and Jodie Emery, will close this weekend after becoming a frequent target of police raids — a consequence the marijuana activists blame on the government’s support of licensed producers. 

The dispensaries were making pot available in contravention of the law, until recreational marijuana is actually legalized by the government, a process expected to happen in July 2018.

But former owner Jodie Emery said she believes dispensaries in Toronto have been raided more frequently in the past year because the federal Liberals want to keep the recreational weed market clear for the licensed producers already selling medical marijuana. 

“We’re seeing a government and corporate push to exclude the pioneers, to literally put us in handcuffs and throw us into cages while they move in to open up their own shops to sell their own pot.”

Mtl Pot Dispensaries 20161215

Jodie Emery, right, said the raids on recreational dispensaries have punished the activists who have fought for legalization. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)

The pioneers of pot

The Emerys divested themselves of their Cannabis Culture shops in Toronto on March 10, as part of their $30,000 bail conditions on possession and drug trafficking charges. 

Jodie Emery said the couple decided to open the storefronts to fund their activism — and because she believed the franchise model would be successful once Ottawa legalized pot. 

“We wanted to have our spot in this industry, because we’ve earned it and we deserve it …after 10 years of being broke and suffering through prison and court,” she said.

Jamie McConnell, Cannabis Culture general manager

Jamie McConnell, the owner at the Village Dispensary, said he’ll keep doing this somewhere else. (CBC)

The 461 Church St. location was reborn as the Village Cannabis Dispensary after the Emerys sold it to Jamie McConnell, the store’s former manager.

McConnell said his landlord will no longer rent to the dispensary, something he said has happened because of pressure from the police raids and the city.

“I was planning on being here forever, my goal was jail or the landlord locking me out. It looks like the landlord locked me out.”

He said he believes it’s better to have marijuana “activists and users” sell the products than licensed producers, because they know first-hand what makes a quality product.

“I don’t know what the government’s going to do as far as legalization, but I’m not going to stop.”

Legal producers also took risks: lawyer

But Andrea Hill, a corporate and securities lawyer with the firm SkyLaw who represents several regulated marijuana firms, said the dispensaries have been shut down because what they’re doing is illegal. It has nothing to do with the regulated medical marijuana industry.

And those licensed producers have been pioneers in the industry as well, she said. 

“They’ve put themselves on the line just as much as anyone else,” the lawyer said. “If a business is operating outside of the law and it can’t make it and it has to shut down I think that means that the law wins — and that people who play by the rules win, at the end of the day. I think that’s a good thing.

CANADA MARIJUANA/REGULATIONS

The Liberal government is expected to make recreational pot legal by July 1, 2018. (Julie Gordon/Reuters)

Corrections
  • An earlier version of this story indicated that recreational marijuana is expected to be legalized by the federal government this July. In fact, it is expected in July 2018.

    Apr 08, 2017 8:23 AM ET

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Moving Beyond Cannabis Culture: An Interview with Jodie Emery

By Jon Hiltz on March 23rd, 2017 at 8:20 am

6 ways

 

It’s impossible to look at the history of marijuana activism in Canada and not think of Marc and Jodie Emery. Their decades-long fight with the powers that be have culminated into a good part of the reason we are heading toward adult-use cannabis across the nation.

Throughout this battle, they have lost everything, and regained it again, just to lose it once more. The perfect example of this would be the four years Marc Emery spent in a U.S. prison for openly selling mail-order seeds across the border.

Canada’s unwillingness to stop this extradition of a nonviolent “criminal” was a stark example of a government not supportive of the needs of cannabis users everywhere.

Now, we are at a point where Canada is scheduled to legalize marijuana for everyone 18 and older. Despite that fact, the Emerys have once again been targeted by authorities; and this time, the government has taken away a most precious possession — their life’s work.

This week, as part of their bail conditions, Marc and Jodie have been forced to cut all ties with their brand Cannabis Culture.

Yesterday, Marijuana.com reported the facts on the ground as Jodie Emery headed to Vancouver to remove herself as director of the company. Once that task was complete Jodie took the time to speak with us about the reality she and her husband must confront.


What does it feel like to hand over something that you essentially put your blood, sweat and tears into?

When I moved to Vancouver in 2004 I wanted to do activism so I started working with Marc Emery at Cannabis Culture Magazine and Pot TV. In 2005, I was made the Assistant Editor of Cannabis Culture Magazine. I spent every day slaving away over that beautiful print publication and also engaging in activism because that very same year Marc was facing life in prison. I took great pride in what I did.

It’s not just a magazine, a head shop, a vapour lounge or dispensaries, it’s an idea of what legalization looks like. It’s a mission statement for people who believe that we shouldn’t go to prison for a plant. So, it is deeply upsetting to have to give up my involvement with what really has been my identity since I became an adult.

Now that you are free and clear of your business obligations, what are your next steps?

Marc and I are going to do a cross-Canada tour, because we need to have a marijuana truth tour. Right now [MP] Bill Blair is going across Canada and telling all of the police to enforce the [current] laws.

We need to educate the public on the facts about marijuana and remind them that this is a civil liberties issue. We have to make sure no one is being arrested anymore before people are able to profit. We need to talk about how marijuana is a safer choice for recreational consumption than alcohol and talk about the opioid crisis which is extremely newsworthy right now because so many people are dying.

How is Marc handling all this? I know he spent years locked up in a U.S. prison, which by comparison is much harsher, but how is he taking the loss of Cannabis Culture?

Marc is very used to this. He has been arrested, raided and jailed so many times. Marc has had everything taken from him numerous times and he always comes back, builds up again and fights for the cause.

He’s taking it well and he is giving me a hard time because I haven’t been arrested and put in jail before, except for Montreal, but I was arrested for four hours at a hotel, not too hard. This time I actually went to jail so I experienced what people go through and that was upsetting.

At the same time, Marc is wondering what to do next. He’s had many decades of work behind him and he’s tired of all this prohibition nonsense. I’m sure he would like to finally just retire and relax.

Are you concerned about your charges? Do you think they will be dropped?

My concern about our charges is that they’re conspiracy charges. That is a very broad charge to lay on somebody because you don’t even need to commit a crime to be found guilty. The fact that three people agree to break the law makes a conspiracy. They have chosen a very easy way to give us tough punishments and these allegations are very serious.

This government very much wants to shut us up, since they were unable to do so even when they called in the U.S. government to do it for them [through Marc’s previous sentence]. Our [case] will be in the court for a number of years and we do intend to fight it to the fullest. That will probably include a Charter challenge, where we will try to go to the Supreme Court of Canada to challenge the validity of prohibition entirely.

Do you think that the severity of the charges against you were because you were selling adult-use cannabis to anyone 19 or older, as opposed to at the very least, only selling to those with a prescription?

[Our]  stores being for 19+ adults and not pretending to be recreational was groundbreaking and a lot of people thought we were very courageous to do that.

It was something we wanted to do differently than everyone, but we were also addressing the concern people had about Canadians faking their illnesses or paying doctors for access. We thought we could just do away from that model, which was half farce and half unfairness for those who are [actually] sick.

We said time and time again, this is what legalization looks like. For the government and the licensed producers and police, they don’t like that model of legalization. They don’t want people to see that vision, they want people to accept their limited oligopoly.

We don’t have a liquor registry where if you want to drink booze you have to sign up with the government and give them your information, but for marijuana right now that’s what they are doing.

For myself, part of my bail conditions say that I have to use government-approved marijuana medically if I am going to possess any marijuana. In a very sad irony, what they are doing to me is what they are trying to do to Canada.

Do you have hope that things will change? Do you think that when adult-use marijuana comes into play that the government will have listened and that dispensaries will be a part of the mix?

It will take a lot of engagement for people to change the rules. Once it’s legal federally, it’s going to be up to the provinces and municipalities to do most of the regulating. We are going to need people to engage with their provincial governments to tell them what kind of model of distribution we should have.

Change will come, but it only comes when you keep pushing and campaigning. If you sit back and wait they will never do anything. That’s why it’s so important to push the envelope.

So to end on a happy note, what is your fondest memory of running Cannabis Culture?

The people. The wonderful love that we all have for this plant and this culture. It is almost spiritual in a way. It’s a calling that we know this plant is not just a simple little garden flower or vegetable.

We know that cannabis can help save lives. It can prevent people from dying, from sickness, or hard drugs. It’s endless the way this plant can truly help people. It sounds insane, but it’s more true than any god that I have ever heard of.


As Canada edges closer to some form of adult use cannabis, however that may emerge, the Emery’s will do everything in their power to ensure Canadians are given the access they deserve.

It’s clearly not just about being able to get high in peace, it’s about what we are allowed to do as adults in a free society. From Jodie’s point of view, marijuana may be the focus, but freedom to choose is and always has been the ultimate goal.

Photo courtesy of Allie Beckett.

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