Tag Archives: conspiracy

‘Prince of Pot’ Marc Emery Faces Possible Life in Prison

By Jason Sander – Apr 3, 2017

prince-of-pot-marc-emery-faces-possible-life-in-prison

AP

If there’s any living cannabis activist who has earned the term ‘The Prince of Pot’, it’s Marc Emery. He and his wife Jodie own the Cannabis Culture brand in Canada and have been doing their part to end marijuana prohibition for over twenty years. Because of his activism, Emery willingly made himself a target and has paid the price for doing so. Now, he could face possible life in prison.

Marc faces fifteen charges, including conspiracy to commit an indictable offence, trafficking and possession of proceeds of crime, while Jodie Emery faces five similar counts. Officers stole more than 65 kilograms of cannabis and 2.4 kilograms of extract. Police also took $250,000 in cash in several currencies after raiding Cannabis Culture stores across Canada, as well as several homes.

The Emerys were granted bail in a Toronto courtroom in early March, with several harsh conditions – including being barred from going to any Cannabis Culture location or other dispensary, and from facilitating or participating in running any Cannabis Culture shop. There are a total of 19 dispensaries in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec using the Cannabis Culture brand.

“This is my 30th arrest,” Emery said, hearing cheers from his supporters that were gathered outside Old City Hall.

Despite all of his personal sacrifices, Emery seems optimistic about the future of cannabis legalization.

“I’ve been raided six times, and yet, over all these years, we’ve made progress,” he said, in reference to his decades-long mission to see cannabis legalized.

In typical prohibitionist fashion, Steve Watts of the Toronto Drug Squad alleged to the Toronto Star that the Cannabis Culture franchises must have been getting their weed inventory from “illegitimate sources often tied to organized crime,” due to the high volume of cannabis they sell.

This type of narrative is often used to draw an association with organized crime in the minds of people who don’t know any better. The reality is very different. Marc has always been open about his marijuana businesses. He always paid income taxes on his seed sales, showing “marijuana seed vendor” as his occupation on tax returns.

“We’ve been on the front lines of legalization advocacy for twenty-plus years,” Jodie Emery said. “Legalization is coming, and it’s because of people like us, and for us to face these incredibly unjust penalties and punishments is just wrong.”

After being arrested thirty times and already spending five years in the U.S. prison system, Marc now faces possible life in prison for his current charges. He could also be forced to forfeit all of his assets. Emery, like others who are locked up for possession, could be in prison when his dream of legalization finally comes to pass. The hypocrisy of the failed War on Drugs knows no bounds.

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Prince of Pot Marc Emery, wife in Toronto court on drug charges

 

Couple who have marijuana shops across Canada charged with drug trafficking, conspiracy, possession

CBC News Posted: Mar 10, 2017 8:07 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 10, 2017 12:52 PM ET

Marc Emery and his wife Jodie Emery were charged on Thursday with drug trafficking, conspiracy and possession after they were arrested at Toronto's Pearson International Airport.

Jodie and Marc Emery, who is known as the Prince of Pot, are in court at Toronto’s Old City Hall today to face drug trafficking, conspiracy and possession charges.

The Vancouver couple were arrested on Wednesday evening at Pearson International Airport while trying to make their way to a marijuana festival in Europe.

Both the Crown and defence have requested time to review possible bail conditions.The court is discussing whether the couple will be granted bail. The justice of the peace presiding over the hearing fell ill and was taken to hospital.

On Thursday, law enforcement officers in three Canadian cities raided various locations of Cannabis Culture, a chain of marijuana shops owned by the Emerys. Jack Lloyd, a lawyer, is representing the Emerys in Toronto.

 

A police news release said the raids were part of Project Gator, “a Toronto Police Service project targeting marijuana dispensaries.”

Three others were also charged, including the owners of the Toronto location of Cannabis Culture.

Marc Emery, 59, has been charged with:

  • Conspiracy to commit an indictable offence.
  • Three counts of trafficking schedule II.
  • Five counts of possession for the purpose schedule II.
  • Five counts of possession proceeds of crime.
  • Fail-to-comply recognizance.

Jodie Emery, 32, has been charged with:

  • Conspiracy to commit an indictable offence.
  • Trafficking schedule II.
  • Possession for the purpose schedule II.
  • Two counts of possession proceeds of crime.

Cannabis Culture raid

A police officer is seen outside the Cannabis Culture location on Church Street in Toronto during a raid on the store. (Emma Kimmerly/CBC)

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In Honor Of Dr Martin Luther King: -United States Department Of Justice Investigation Of Recent Allegations Regarding The Assassination Of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

On August 26, 1998, the Attorney General directed the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice, assisted by the Criminal Division, to investigate two separate, recent allegations related to the April 4, 1968 assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. These allegations emanate from Loyd Jowers, a former Memphis tavern owner, and Donald Wilson, a former agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

In 1993, 25 years after the murder, Jowers claimed that he participated in a conspiracy to kill Dr. King, along with an alleged Mafia figure, Memphis police officers, and a man named Raoul. According to Jowers, one of the conspirators shot Dr. King from behind his tavern.

Wilson alleged in 1998 that shortly after the assassination, while working as an FBI agent, he took papers from the abandoned car of James Earl Ray, the career criminal who pled guilty to murdering Dr. King. Wilson claims he concealed them for 30 years. Some of the papers contained references to a Raul (the alternate spellings, Raoul and Raul, are discussed in Section I) and figures associated with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. According to Wilson, someone who later worked in the White House subsequently stole the other papers he took from Ray’s car, including one with the telephone number of an FBI office.

Both the Jowers and the Wilson allegations suggest that persons other than or in addition to James Earl Ray participated in the assassination. Ray, within days of entering his guilty plea in 1969, attempted to withdraw it. Until his death in April 1998, he maintained that he did not shoot Dr. King and was framed by a man he knew only as Raoul. For 30 years, others have similarly alleged that Ray was Raoul’s unwitting pawn and that a conspiracy orchestrated Dr. King’s murder. These varied theories have generated several comprehensive government investigations regarding the assassination, none of which confirmed the existence of any conspiracy. However, in King v. Jowers, a recent civil suit in a Tennessee state court, a jury returned a verdict finding that Jowers and unnamed others, including unspecified government agencies, participated in a conspiracy to assassinate Dr. King.

Our mission was to consider whether the Jowers or the Wilson allegations are true and, if so, to detect whether anyone implicated engaged in criminal conduct by participating in the assassination. We have concluded that neither allegation is credible. Jowers and Wilson have both contradicted their own accounts. Moreover, we did not find sufficient, reliable evidence to corroborate either of their claims. Instead, we found significant evidence to refute them. Nothing new was presented during King v. Jowers to alter our findings or to warrant federal investigation of the trial’s conflicting, far-ranging hearsay allegations of a government-directed plot involving the Mafia and African American ministers closely associated with Dr. King. Ultimately, we found nothing to disturb the 1969 judicial determination that James Earl Ray murdered Dr. King or to confirm that Raoul or anyone else implicated by Jowers or suggested by the Wilson papers participated in the assassination.

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