Tag Archives: growing

(fl) Judge: Joe Redner can legally grow his own marijuana

Justine Griffin

Published: April 11, 2018

A court ruled Wednesday that Tampa strip club owner Joe Redner can grow his own marijuana for medical purposes, a decision that lawyers say could lead to a wave of similar cases.

The ruling by Leon County Circuit Judge Karen Gievers applies only to Redner, 77. The Florida Department of Health responded quickly, filing an appeal.

The department had said Floridians are barred under state rules from growing cannabis for their personal use, including those who are legally registered as medical marijuana patients.

But Redner and other critics across the state say the health department continues to create barriers for more than 95,000 registered patients in Florida that could benefit from marijuana. Redner is a stage 4 lung cancer survivor and a registered medical marijuana patient.

“Under Florida law, Plantiff Redner is entitled to possess, grow and use marijuana for juicing, soley for the purpose of his emulsifying the biomass he needs for the juicing protocol recommended by his physician,” Gievers said in her ruling. The word “solely” is bolded and underlined for emphasis in the document.

“The court also finds … that the Florida Department of Health has been, and continues to be non-compliant with the Florida constitutional requirements,” the judge added, referring to the constitutional amendment approved by voters in 2016 that made medical marijuana legal.

Redner’s attorney, Luke Lirot of Clearwater, said the judge was right to “castigate the health department for being a barrier to medicine.”

While the ruling affects only Redner, Lirot says his case “does provide a usable approach for other people whose doctors will certify that this is of value.”

In the meantime, the state’s appeal will block Redner from growing his own marijuana right away. Lirot said his first order of business will be to try to lift the stay that prevents Redner from growing and juicing marijuana during the appeals process, which likely won’t begin until late this year or early next year.

“The appellate process takes a long time, and in this case, it’s going to affect Redner’s life exclusively,” said Jay Wolfson, a professor at Stetson University College of Law and the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida. “Because this issue is big enough, no matter who loses in appeals, the case will go on the state supreme court after this. You can bet on that.”

In January, Gievers denied a motion by the Florida Department of Health to dismiss Redner’s case. The judge also denied Redner’s motion for an emergency temporary injunction, which would have allowed him to grow marijuana plants during the court process. But she described Redner’s plea in the case as “constitutional in nature,” which allowed it to move forward.

In her ruling, Gievers says the health department “has still not complied with the Constitution,” and until it stops “violating its constitutional duty and mandated presumptive regulation, the evidence clearly demonstrates that Redner is entitled to follow the recommendations of his certified physician under Florida law.”

“The Legislature failed to act and that has a lot of consequences. This case is one of them,” said Leslie Sammis, a Tampa-based defense attorney who is also a member of the The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws legal committee. “I think that the state and the health department should focus their energy on coming into compliance with this court order instead of stalling until it’s forced upon them by the courts.”

During a short, non-jury trial in March, attorneys representing the health department warned that Redner’s case could open the door to more lawsuits over the constitutional amendment’s language. Several lawsuits already have been filed against the department, but none other than Redner’s has specifically challenged the state agency’s interpretation of the amendment’s language.

“It is my understanding that the health department is facing many pending lawsuits,” Wolfson said. “It’s a legal quagmire.”

Redner says this means other patients should be able to challenge to possess their own plants, too.

“With this order, (patients) can go to their doctor now, and as long as they have a good enough reason to need to possess a plant, be it because they can’t afford the medicine at the dispensaries, as long as they have a recommendation anyone should be allowed to grow,” Redner said. “The cat is out of the bag. There’s no way to stop this now.”

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Canadian Oil Men Continue On…Daren McCormick’s Preliminary Hearing begins…

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people sitting

Free Man On The Land Daren Wayne of the Family McCormick, son of a Canadian Military Man, is originally from Northport, Nova Scotia.  He has traveled all across Canada and Europe and it was in his travels that he met the infamous Mr. Rick Simpson.

He was introduced to Rick Simpson and saw what he had accomplished with Cannabis oil and he began growing “for the cause”, to help seriously ill people, at virtually no charge.   After Rick Simpson was raided and left Canada, Daren continued on.

The rest is becoming history…

The last plant left behind after the raid

Above:   Rick Simpson, with the last plant left behind after the raid

Darren7

Chris Harrigan has been following Daren’s story closely and has documented the saga on video.

This first link to the video below gives the background of the story.

I will ask you to please watch the video’s as they absolutely  explain the situation at hand and why everyone should rally and support Daren in his unjust predicament.  He is absolutely being targeted for giving away free Cannabis oil to seriously ill people. 

ChrisHarrigan

The next video gives some information about the preliminary trial in Daren’s last arrest which took place on April 3rd. 

Darren6

Below:  April 3rd, after the Preliminary Trial

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Daren has a very dedicated entourage of followers who believe in his cause and know of the injustice that has been inflicted upon him and they steadfastly remain by his side to support him.

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Above:  Daren’s Cannabis garden, after the raid on August 23, 2017.

There is so much information available on Daren’s cases that there is no way I could input it all here.  Please use the links provided to see what has been published so far.

I will post any further information that I get.

Below:  A Star Is Born!

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Kevin James  April 2 ·  

Introducing the Cumberland Colchester Marijuana Party of Nova Scotia.
Pursuant to s448 (2)c; s449 of the Canada Elections Act, and s.127 (3.2) of the Income Tax Act;
[…is an electoral district association of the marijuana party & its AGENTS, ARE AUTHORIZED TO ISSUE OFFICIAL RECEIPTS…]
Corporate Structure, Formalization & Bylaws to be released shortly….
Meet the Rev Bros… REvenue Agents…
☆ stay tuned…

attending Court Support Drop Charges Keep Daren Free! with Daren Mccormick, marijuana party and Miss Molly in Amherst, Nova Scotia.

Darren5

RELATED:

Cannabis and Coffee…with Daren McCormick

DAREN MCCORMICK IS OUT!

“I think I had an undercover Cop in my driveway yesterday”…

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10214606231003819&set=a.4603332195673.175806.1063400382&type=3&theater

http://cannabishealthindex.com/

http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/news/local/charges-against-simpson-withdrawn-29171/

https://www.cannabisculture.com/content/2007/09/18/5081

http://www.salem-news.com/articles/december052009/rick_simpson_bk.php

https://www.facebook.com/what4man?hc_location=ufi

https://steemit.com/medicine/@xhrgn/urgent-canadian-cannabis-healer-facing-minimum-of-5-years-in-prison

https://steemit.com/medicine/@xhrgn/canadian-cannabis-healer-daren-mccormick-s-preliminary-trial-today

Darren3

skrider

Old mining town turns to marijuana after prison, factory close

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WALSENBURG, Colo. – A developer’s plan to build hundreds of cannabis greenhouses could make this tiny southern Colorado town one of the nation’s largest producers of legal marijuana.

The town sold 330 acres of municipal land for more than $1 million to create a campus for growing, processing and distribution, with the marijuana to be trucked 160 miles north to consumers in metro Denver. Walsenburg is a former coal mining town that never recovered when the mines closed by the 1960s, and its population has dropped to fewer than 3,000 residents. In Huerfano County, which is home to Walsenburg, 20% of the population lives below poverty level.

Today, the town’s main street is filled with vacant buildings offered at cheap rent. Most people drive through the historic downtown without stopping, often headed west to Great Sand Dunes National Park or Wolf Creek Ski Area. The marijuana project envisions pumping $1 million monthly into the local economy, giving town officials funds for road and infrastructure repairs, and also offering as many as a 1,000 direct and related jobs.

"The only export we really had was smart kids. Now hopefully this will be able to retain those kids in this community," said Walsenburg Mayor James Eccher.

The Martra Development project proposes having about 500 people working on the site, with each greenhouse rented out separately. That will allow smaller growers to get started while giving them room to expand. Martra officials visited 17 counties in Colorado searching for the right combination of land, water and a business-friendly climate.

"There’s people who are saying, ‘hey, embrace this. And then there are CAVE people – citizens against virtually everything. You’re not going to satisfy everybody. What you have to do is try to do is at least not anger the majority," said county administrator John Galusha.

Today, most marijuana grown in Colorado is grown indoors in warehouses stuffed with high-powered lights to mimic the sun. Industry experts say warehouses in urban areas were simply the easiest place for growers to set up shop, especially for those accustomed to hiding their work.

Indoor marijuana cultivation uses so much energy that Boulder County, Colo., enacted a special fee to offset the power demands by growers running lights for 12 hours a day. With marijuana legal in Colorado, a growing number of developers are erecting special-purpose cannabis greenhouses in traditionally agricultural areas to take advantage of abundant natural sunlight and a long growing season.

USA TODAY

Power to the pot: Marijuana growers face electric fee

"A cannabis operator, who’s been operating up there (in Denver) with the boot on his neck, just choking to death on his overhead, looks at this model and says ‘when can I have it?" said Brian Trani, Martra’s CEO.

The answer, Trani says, is as soon as October. County officials say the project has been met with some skepticism by locals who say Walsenburg has had its hoped dashed before, including when a nearby privately-run prison and a manufactured-home factory closed.

Count Maria Cocchiarelli-Berger among the skeptics. The curator of the town’s contemporary art museum, she worries Walsenburg is pinning too many hopes on a single project. Still, she admits, the town needs to do something.

"I like to be optimistic, but having lived here for 10 years now, I’ve seen a number of ideas come through that were going to save us. We’ve pinned our hopes on these things … but lots of people just last six months or a year. I do hope it works, but until I see it working, I really am not sure that that’s going to be the key out of the mess we’re in."

A marijuana-growing supply store opened in downtown Walsenburg a few months ago, and co-founder Luara Tank says she’s struggling to keep lights, potting soil and other equipment in stock. On the store counter sits a dish of replacement springs for marijuana-trimming shears, and while the store has been welcomed, some customers still park around back or up the street, she said. Tank moved to Walsenburg to grow, and got tired of making the two-hour round-trip drive to buy supplies.

USA TODAY

Patchwork of pot rules hampers marijuana business expansion

"People were guerrilla-growing anyway," Tank said. "It’s pretty perfect here for growing. There’s no jobs here, so you have to make your own job."

Four states have legalized recreational marijuana, along with the District of Columbia, and 23 states and the District have legalized some form of medical marijuana. In many cases, officials levy taxes on the marijuana products to help move the marketplace from the black market to a legitimate business. Colorado reported collecting $10.6 million in legal marijuana taxes and fees in May, twice the amount it collected a year ago, with $91 million collected in the nearly-finished fiscal year.

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