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In Memory of Cher Ford-McCullough

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Shawna Fibikar is with Cher Ford-mccullough.

Yesterday at 9:38am ·

We’ve been asked for obituary details to be used for many publications and websites. GoFundMe information will follow yet today to help offset medical costs not covered by mom’s Medicare B and to organize a celebration of life concert in August.

FORD-MCCULLOUGH, Cheryl Jeanne (Morarie) –

Cher Ford-McCullough  age 66, died Friday, June 1st, 2018 at her Hopkinton, IA home following a brief battle with lung/liver cancer.

It was always said that Cher was born an adult. Her mother once said she wasn’t raised… she was snatched up by the hair of the head. She had responsibility placed on her literally at birth. She helped to raise her four siblings and at the age of 21 and 25 raised two beautiful daughters.

As a single mother she worked hard as a waitress and bartender to provide for her kids. Cher might not have been able to afford a big fancy house or nice vacations, but she gave her children unforgettable experiences through her music. Cher was a singer in many bands and found her most success from 1980-1984 when singing for the band Crossbow in Oklahoma City, OK. “Us kids” were drug to many performances, would sleep in “green rooms” while she was on stage and even had an opportunity to perform ourselves a time or two. I, Shawna, can personally attest to a standing ovation from a bar full of people after singing ‘Cat Scratch Fever” at the age of five. Her love for music continued right to the end – she was constantly writing new songs and knew every song that came on the car radio. She was particularly taken in the last year with the song ‘Sign of the Times’ by Harry Styles.

Growing up poor, Cher knew what it was like to get bullied for circumstances out of her control. Because of that experience she learned to stand up for herself and others. She wasn’t afraid to stick up for her siblings when they got picked on as kids and this fearlessness continued in to her adulthood when she protested alongside Jesse Jackson after the 2003 Goose Creek raid in South Carolina where police held guns at children’s head in the hallways upon responding to a drug activity call.

In the last 20 years of her life she made it her life goal to make a difference and give a voice to those who didn’t have one. She was the founder and president of the Women’s Organization for National Prohibition Reform, Kentucky State Director for the American Alliance for Medical Cannabis, president of Compassionate Moms, a member of the ACLU and the Southern Poverty Law Center, is listed as one of Skunk Magazines top influential women of the cannabis world, funded the Million Marijuana Marches in Paducah, spoke at the Seattle Hemp Feast and 2003 Global Million Marijuana March, participated in the 2004 March for Women’s Lives in Washington, DC, Florida Journey for Justice, Ohio Journey for Justice, Texas Journey for Justice, and worked with long-time marijuana activist and occasional political candidate Gatewood Galbraith since 1999. Her name is listed on the Wall of Tolerance in the Civil Rights Memorial Center in Montgomery, AL, and she actively worked on drug policy and prison reform.

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She will be sorely missed and survived by her husband of 30 years Brian McCullough, siblings: Cheri Tippets, Lynn Casteel, Billie Clifton, and Bill Morarie, children: Shawna Fibikar, Danielle Ford, grandchildren: Rya (Johnson) Ramsey, Jordan Johnson, Chandler Johnson, Dawson Schmidt, Sebastian Charles and Cecilia Charles.

She was preceded in death by her father William Morarie, mother Thelma Healan, a son Robbie who was born prematurely and many beloved pets, some of her most favorite being Katie the raccoon, Woody the squirrel and the many, many ducks and geese that frequented her lake house in Gilbertsville, KY.

A ‘Celebration of Life’ will be held in August, in lieu of a service, that will involve live music, stories being shared and laughter. Details to come via her Facebook profile.

SOURCE LINK

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There will be another post published this week with more links to history of Cher Ford-McCullough.

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Lexology Report: Congress temporarily de-funds US-DOJ medical marijuana prosecution but does not legalize medical marijuana

  • Littler Mendelson
  • Dale L. Deitchler

     

    • USA
    • December 30 2014

     

    Dale L. Deitchler Author page »

    In a few short paragraphs within the 1,603-page congressional spending bill signed into law on December 16, 2014, Congress prohibited the U.S. Department of Justice from using federal funds to prosecute users, growers and distributors of medical marijuana in states that have enacted medical marijuana statutes.  The full text of the de-funding rider barring the DOJ from the use of funds to “prevent. . . implementation” of state and local laws legalizing medical marijuana states:

    Sec. 538. None of the funds made available in this Act to the Department of Justice may be used, with respect to the States of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin, to prevent such States from implementing their own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.

    Sec. 539. None of the funds made available by this Act may be used in contravention of section 7606 (“Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research”) of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-79) by the Department of Justice or the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Several U.S. Supreme Court decisions have upheld prosecution of medical marijuana growers and users under the federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA).  Nevertheless, the Obama Administration, as a matter of policy, has directed the DOJ to take a relaxed approach to prosecution and the DOJ has done so, except for use that impacts the DOJ’s “enforcement priorities” (e.g., preventing the distribution of marijuana to minors, preventing the revenue from the sale of marijuana from going to criminal enterprises, gangs and cartels).  This new de-funding measure now codifies that policy approach as law.  (Notably, the rider does not affect IRS or Treasury Department actions relating to payment of taxes by marijuana suppliers and online banking).

    The legislation, however, does not legalize medical marijuana.  Rather, the federal ban on marijuana continues – i.e., both medical and recreational marijuana continue to be illegal under CSA Schedule I.  And, though de-funding may affect enforcement of criminal laws in states with medical marijuana statutes, it has no effect in states that have not legalized marijuana, nor does it express any limitations on employer action on the basis of a positive marijuana test result administered under a workplace drug testing policy.  Finally, the rider expires on September 30, 2015, and may or may not be renewed heading into the heart of the presidential election campaign in the fall of 2015.  For all of these reasons, though significant in reflecting current legislators’ thinking at the national level regarding CSA enforcement, the mere enactment of the spending bill with this provision does not warrant adjustment to drug testing policies of employers choosing to continue to treat confirmed positive marijuana test results as positive even when the result was caused by medicinal use that is lawful under state or local law.

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  • Federal Spending Bill Blocks Funding For Medical Marijuana Raids, Legalization In D.C.

    The proposed congressional budget released Tuesday night prevents the Department of Justice from using funds to undermine state laws regarding medical marijuana.

    posted on Dec. 9, 2014, at 9:20 p.m.

    Michelle Broder Van Dyke BuzzFeed News Reporter

     

    The House budget passed Tuesday night prevents the Department of Justice and Drug Enforcement Administration from using funds to interfere with state laws that legalize medical marijuana.

    The amendment was introduced by California Reps. Dana Rohrabacher, a Republican, and Sam Farr, a Democrat, and was approved by the House of Representatives in May. It implies that DEA raids on medical marijuana patients in states where it is legal will stop.

    The budget Senate proposal — which must still go back to the House for a full vote before it lands on President Obama’s desk — would keep all but the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) operating normally through the end of the fiscal year in 2015.

    The compromise bill was approved with Republicans agreeing to put off a fight with Obama over his immigration policies until February, when funding for the DHS is slated to run out, the Associated Press reported.

    The bill’s Section 538, which addresses medical marijuana, reads:

    None of the funds made available in this Act to the Department of Justice may be used, with respect to the States of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin, to prevent such States from implementing their own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.

    The bill also includes a section that protects industrial hemp cultivation.

    None of the funds made available by this Act may be used in contravention of section 7606 (”Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research”) of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Public Law 113–79) by the Department of Justice or the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty

    Marijuana advocates were pleased with the bill.

    Tom Angell, founder of Marijuana Majority, said in statement to BuzzFeed News: “Congressional leaders seem to have finally gotten the message that a supermajority of Americans wants states to be able to implement sensible marijuana reforms without federal interference.”

    Angell also urged the Obama administration to use this opportunity to “reschedule marijuana immediately.” Marijuana is currently classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning it’s a dangerous narcotic with no accepted medical use. Heroin and LSD are also classified Schedule I, while cocaine and methamphetamine are Schedule II, a lower ranking.

    Advocates say reclassifying the drug would allow for state and federal laws to be in sync, and conserve law enforcement resources. It would also ease access to research of the drug and tension between banks and marijuana retailers.

    Erik Altieri, communication director for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, also released a statement that said: “By restricting these agencies in this manner, the nearly two dozen states that implemented medical marijuana programs can hopefully breathe easier knowing federal money won’t be spent to interfere with their progress. We hope this leads to further reforms at the federal level further enshrining this sentiment into law.”

    The bill also effectively blocks the legalization of recreational marijuana use in Washington, D.C., but preserves its decriminalization law.

    Voters in Washington, D.C., overwhelmingly passed a recreational marijuana referendum on the November ballot, which is now effectively blocked. The District passed a decriminalization bill in April that will remain intact.

    The proposed bill’s appropriations section, which allocates millions in funds to the district, states:

    “None of the Federal funds contained in this Act may be used to enact or carry out any law, rule, or regulation to legalize or otherwise reduce penalties associated with the possession, use, or distribution of any schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.) or any tetrahydrocannabinols derivative.”

    Unlike most states, Washington, D.C., doesn’t take in any local revenue that it can spend and receives all of its funding from the federal government, so the ban on using funds for legalization effectively blocks the referendum voters recently passed.

    Earlier on Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, said of the rider: “I’m opposed to what the House is trying to do.”

    “If they put it in there, it’s going to be hard to take it out over here,” he added.

    Marijuana advocates in Washington D.C. and those who advocate for the district’s autonomy were not pleased. D.C. Cannabis Campaign, which sponsored the ballot measure to legalize weed, tweeted the following:

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    Mummy Proves America Is 2,400 Years Behind On Medical Marijuana

    mummyemebed

    Photo: Via Wikimedia Commons.

    A 2,400-year-old “Siberian Ice Maiden” apparently knew something that not all US lawmakers do: Cannabis is a perfect palliative for cancer.
    Discovered in 1993 by archaeologist Natalia Polosmak, the mummified remains of this woman, also known as the “Princess of Ukok,” were recently examined by a team of Russian scientists. They found that the woman, who was heavily tattooed and died when she was between 20 and 30 years old, suffered from and ultimately succumbed to breast cancer.
    “‘I am quite sure of the diagnosis — she had cancer,” one of the scientists told the Siberian Times. “She was extremely emaciated. Given her rather high rank in society and the information scientists obtained studying mummies of elite Pazyryks, I do not have any other explanation of her state. Only cancer could have such an impact.”
    The researchers also believe that the woman used cannabis to treat herself. A container of the herb was found in her burial chamber, along with a “cosmetics bag.”
    “Probably for this sick woman, sniffing cannabis was a forced necessity,” another scientist said, noting that wine, hashish, opium, henbane, mandrake, aconite, and Indian hemp were all used at the time as painkillers. “And she was often in altered state of mind. We can suggest that through her could speak the ancestral spirits and gods. Her ecstatic visions in all likelihood allowed her to be considered as some chosen being, necessary and crucial for the benefit of society. She can be seen as the darling of spirits and cherished until her last breath.”
    Hey, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania: Stick that in your pipe and smoke it. (Siberian Times)

    Cancer-stricken Mackenzie prepares for pot sentencing

     

     

    Posted Online: Sept. 06, 2014, 5:31 pm

    Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story
    By Rachel Warmke, rwarmke@qconline.com

     

    marijuana leaf

     

    His gait is slow, and his eyelids often battle against the weight of sleep.  Benton Mackenzie struggles, pausing to rest on each step as he climbs to the main floor of his parents’ two-story home, tucked between Eldridge and Long Grove. His eyes close and his back hunches from the effort as he finally reaches the top step.  Enveloped in a heavy blanket, the 48-year-old takes halting steps towards the dining room table. He stops to arrange a stack of pillows on his chair then sinks down, his face clenched in pain, the shape of his tumors obvious beneath the folds of his gray sweatpants.

    The bulbous cysts are painful reminders of an aggressive form of cancer he has tried to combat by growing marijuana and self-treating with cannabis oil. Benton says the oil — which has low amounts of THC, the psychoactive chemical that makes smokers high — has kept his tumors at bay for more than four years.  Illegal in Iowa, his actions drew the attention of Scott County prosecutors.
    In May, a Scott County jury convicted Benton, wife Loretta and their son, Cody, 22, of marijuana charges related to 71 plants and paraphernalia found at the home the family shares with Benton’s parents.
    “He wasn’t bothering anybody, he wasn’t even telling anybody. And here’s all these people who are salivating over this,” his mother, Dorothy “Dottie” Mackenzie, 75, said. “It has gotten to be a joke.”
    The family is scheduled to be sentenced at 2 p.m. Tuesday in Davenport before Scott County Judge Henry Latham II.

    Stephen Bloomer, a longtime friend of the Mackenzies, also was charged with helping to grow the marijuana. He took a plea deal to avoid trial and will be sentenced Sept. 18.
    Benton maintains that his crime was nothing more than being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Or more precisely, the wrong state.

    Scott County attorney Mike Walton has said he had no choice but to prosecute, given Benton’s prior convictions, including possession of magic mushrooms in 2000 and a 2010 cannabis arrest. In the latter case, Benton maintained he was producing oil for treatment that was more effective than rounds of painful chemotherapy.  “Those are his reasons for breaking the law,” Mr. Walton said.
    Benton continues to defend those reasons with scripture, medical research and by citing the spread of medical marijuana laws around the country. “It is not lawful to stand idly by while somebody else suffers,” he said.

    Recently back from a trip to Portland, Ore. — where he can buy cannabis oil for medical use — Benton said he was struck by the difference in attitudes, compared to Iowa, where he is currently required to live due to probation restrictions. “It was very refreshing, and overwhelming at the same time,” he said. “We weren’t prepared for that much reception.”
    Oregon’s Medical Marijuana Act was passed in 1998. About 65,000 medical marijuana cards are issued to state residents for conditions ranging from cancer and epilepsy to post traumatic stress and Alzheimer’s, according to the Oregon Health Authority.  The state also is gearing up to vote in November over whether to legalize recreational marijuana.

    The trip to Portland — which Judge Latham did not object to — was hard on Benton, whose plane ride was made bearable by morphine-based painkillers.
    “It was torture,” he said. “It’s almost getting to the point where if I don’t take first class, I just can’t fit in the seat.”
    Benton draws the blanket tighter around his shoulders as he talks, his voice at times reaching barely above a whisper.
    His parents’ home around him is cheerfully decorated, brimming with antiques, framed family pictures and paintings done by his brother.
    But the quiet family scene was interrupted last June when heavily armed police officers swarmed outside.
    Loretta answered the door to guns pointed in her face and shouts of “Get on the floor!” the family said.

    “They’ve actually treated this family like we’re some sort of a mafia family or something,” Loretta said. “The kind of gusto they put into it … I mean, 20 SWAT agents at 5:45 a.m.?”
    Loretta gave up her job to care for Benton after his diagnosis with angiosarcoma in 2011 and, during the recent trial, plumped pillows, fetched water, juggled doctor visits and accompanied him to the hospital after he suffered dizziness and hallucinations.

    She spoke excitedly about the family’s trip to Portland. “It’s been amazing. They’ve had the freedom for so many years to innovate with cannabis science. I mean, everybody had their own recipe for tinctures and oils: ‘Use this stuff for burns; use this stuff for aches and pains.’ And, it all works.”
    After landing, they went to a local dispensary to get cannabis oil and cannabis juice, the taste of which Benton likened to wheat grass or “grass clippings.”
    They were not allowed to bring the cannabis products back to Iowa.

    Frustratingly for the family, Iowa Governor Terry Branstad signed into a law a medical marijuana bill in May that only allowed epileptics and their caregivers to legally purchase cannabis oil.
    “That’s the nature of the bill,” Benton said. “With the oil that I need — if I had epilepsy I could bring it back.”
    Since the Mackenzie family was convicted, supporters have collected more than 16,000 signatures to petition Gov. Branstad to pardon the family.
    Jimmy Centers, a spokesman for the governor, declined to comment on whether Gov. Branstad would consider a pardon, saying it was “premature to offer an opinion on a case” prior to sentencing.
    Portland provided the Mackenzies a brief reprieve from thinking about the case.

    They were invited to speak on the Internet-based show “Cannabis Common Sense,” hosted by Paul Stanford.
    Loretta ended up doing most of the talking after Benton started to nod off, drained of energy from taking stronger doses of oil than he was used to so he could make up for treatment time lost.
    Every time I’m forced to be without it, or am just without it, it takes so much more coming back to be as effective as it was before,” he said.
    In Iowa, it’s clear that the family’s paranoia about being targeted by police has not lessened since the trial. At one point during dinner, conversation among the four adults abruptly halted as they strained to watch a black SUV drive slowly past the house.

    “They still drive around here,” Dottie said, shaking her head.

    They had brief relief last month when prosecutor Patrick McElyea dropped charges against Dottie and husband Charles “Chuck” Mackenzie, 76, saying there was no evidence to suggest they hosted a drug house.
    The aging couple said they repeatedly declined plea deals offered by prosecutors, in the hope of going to trial and telling their son’s story.
    Despite showing up to court in a wheelchair and bandages, Benton’s medical condition was kept secret from jurors, as were his reasons for growing the cannabis plants.
    Judge Latham prohibited Benton from using his medical condition as a legal defense, based on the 2005 Iowa Supreme Court decision in State v. Bonjour, in which an AIDS patient arrested for growing marijuana was barred from using a medical defense.

    Benton repeatedly challenged Judge Latham’s decision, pointing to Bible passages, such as Genesis 1:29, to argue that God created “seed-bearing plants” — including cannabis — for human use.
    “He has never been one to let rules stop him if the rule is stupid,” Dottie said. “Rules always had to make sense to Ben.”
    The family dreams of one day moving to Oregon, where Benton could legally grow and purchase marijuana to manage his cancer.
    Plans are cloudier if the sentencing puts them in prison jumpsuits. With the extensive care and treatment Benton requires, the family can’t imagine what imprisonment would mean for them.
    “I’m certain that Ben’s case is not the only case of somebody who is using marijuana to treat medical issues,” Loretta said. “People are too scared to fight, and I think, if anything, they’re looking at this and saying ‘Wow.’ I think some people will come out of the closet.”

    Chuck, thinks marijuana has been unfairly demonized at the expense of those who need it.
    “People are afraid of it — you see people, you say marijuana, and they equate it with somebody laying down on a street corner, smoking,” Chuck said. “And that’s not what this is about.”
    For now, Benton remains in pain, his family praying for a miracle. He says he is waiting for the “punchline” to all of this.
    “I think it’s built to a point where it has to make a change,” Benton said. “Something is going to happen because of it. It’s un-ignorable.”

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    Judge Henry Latham’s ruling was filed. "I’m not allowed to give proof why I was using. Now, there is no fair trial."

               

    Since his arrest last summer, Benton Mackenzie has maintained he grew marijuana to treat terminal cancer.

    Now, just days ahead of going to trial Monday on drug conspiracy charges, a Scott County District judge has ruled he won’t allow Mackenzie to use his ailment as a defense.

    “I’m not allowed to mention anything,” Mackenzie said Thursday, the day Judge Henry Latham’s ruling was filed. “I’m not allowed to give proof why I was using. Now, there is no fair trial.”

    The 48-year-old, who shared his story with the Quad-City Times last September, was diagnosed with angiosarcoma in 2011. It’s a cancer of the blood vessels, in which tumors appear as skin lesions.

    He says the lesions have grown enormous since sheriff’s deputies confiscated 71 marijuana plants from his parents’ Long Grove home last summer. He needed all those plants just to be able to extract enough cannabis oil for daily treatments, he says.

    Mackenzie wants to be able to tell jurors why he grew marijuana. He wants to show them pictures of his cancerous lesions.

    “If I’m to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth, and the court doesn’t let me tell the truth, they’re making me a liar,” he said.

    Assistant Scott County Attorney Patrick McElyea, who is prosecuting Mackenzie, filed a motion earlier this month to limit any testimony regarding medical marijuana. He has declined to comment on the case.

    McElyea based his motion on the 2005 Iowa Supreme Court decision in State v. Bonjour, a case similar to Mackenzie’s. Lloyd Bonjour, an AIDS patient, was convicted of growing marijuana, and the Supreme Court upheld the conviction.

    Latham sided with McElyea’s motion, stating, “The court is not aware of any legislation or been provided with any legislation which provides for such defense.”

    The judge states he is aware Mackenzie has angiosarcoma. He also is aware Iowa lawmakers recently legalized oil concentrated with cannabidiol, or CBD, with “specific restrictions.”

    The pending law, expected to be signed today by Gov. Terry Branstad, only applies to those suffering severe epileptic seizures.

    Mackenzie says he thinks state government is the “bigger criminal,” because it’s practicing medicine without a license in deciding who can and who cannot possess medical marijuana.

    “At least the state is now recognizing, with a law, that marijuana has medicinal value,” he said, adding his plants were from a strain rich in CBD, which in other states is associated more with medical use than recreational use.

    Without the medical necessity defense, Mackenzie said his fate is “completely in the Lord’s hands.”

    Sitting through several hours of hearings over the past 11 months has been hard enough on someone with lesions covering his legs and rear, he says. He can’t imagine sitting through an entire trial, which is scheduled to begin Monday with jury selection.

    He says he may show up to court wearing a kilt, so jurors can see for themselves. But he wouldn’t want his lesions oozing and bleeding all over the courtroom furniture.

    “That shows how much of a criminal I’m not,” he said.

    At one point during a phone conversation with a reporter Thursday afternoon, he reacted because one of his larger lesions opened up and bled onto the chair and floor at home, he said.

    “I’m sitting in a pile of blood,” he said a moment later.

    He wants to request a nurse or a medical provider be allowed to sit in the courtroom with him. He says the judge is allowing breaks, but he expects he’ll have to take a break every few minutes just to replace the large, disposable underpad for furniture.

    He anticipates that with his failing health and the number of co-defendants, the trial will come across as a “circus.”

    Mackenzie is charged with felony drug possession along with his wife, Loretta Mackenzie. His 73-year-old parents, Dorothy and Charles Mackenzie, are charged with hosting a drug house, and his son, Cody, is charged with misdemeanor possession. His childhood friend, Stephen Bloomer, also is charged in the drug conspiracy.

    All six defendants are being represented by a different attorney.

    Lately, Mackenzie’s health has been “touch and go,” he says, with episodes of vomiting, cold sweats and extreme pain. He almost always feels tired.

    He raised enough money from family and friends to travel twice this spring to Oregon, which has legalized medical marijuana.

    Each trip was a week long. During the first trip, he met with a physician, who approved him for a state medical marijuana identification card. On the second trip, he was able to purchase oil in an amount equivalent to a pound and a half of marijuana, which he couldn’t by law bring back to Iowa.

    The little bit of relief is nothing compared to the daily treatments prior to his arrest, when he was shrinking his skin lesions, he said. He claims the oil in Oregon also stopped the growth of the lesions, but only temporarily.

    Mackenzie said he hopes jurors will show compassion in deciding his future.

    “No matter what, if I’m found guilty, I’ll do at least three years in prison, which is a death sentence for me,” he said. “If I’m found guilty at all, I’m a dead man. I’m lucky I’m not dead already.”

    Copyright 2014 The Quad-City Times. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    Tags

    Benton Mackenzie, Iowa, Henry Latham, Medical Cannabis, Cannabidiol, Cannabis, Iowa Supreme Court, Mackenzie, Patrick Mcelyea, Cannabis Oil, Lloyd Bonjour, Legalized Oil, Cancer, Marijuana, Medical Marijuana

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