Tag Archives: marijana

Study: Arrests For Marijuana Offenses Increasing In Many States –

by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director July 30, 2014

 

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Law enforcement in many states are making a greater number of marijuana arrests than ever before despite polling data showing that the majority of Americans believe that the adult use of the plant ought to be legal.

According to a just published report, “Marijuana in the States 2012: Analysis and Detailed Data on Marijuana Use and Arrests,” which appears on the newly launched RegulatingCannabis.com website, police made an estimated 750,000 arrests for marijuana violations in 2012 – a 110 percent increase in annual arrests since 1991. Yet, despite this doubling in annual marijuana arrests over the past two decades, there has not been any significant reduction in marijuana consumption in the United States the report found.

In 2012, marijuana arrests accounted for almost half (48.3 percent) of all drug arrests nationwide. Marijuana arrests accounted for two-thirds of more of all drug arrests in five states: Nebraska (74.1 percent), New Hampshire (72 percent), Montana (70.3 percent), Wyoming (68.7 percent) and Wisconsin (67.1 percent).

From 2008 to 2012, seventeen state-level jurisdictions experienced an average annual increase in marijuana arrests, the report found. South Carolina (11.6 percent) and the District of Columbia (7.7 percent) experienced the highest overall percentage increase in arrests during this time period. By contrast, annual marijuana arrests fell nationwide by an average of 3.3 percent from 2008 to 2012.

Overall, the study reported that the five state-level jurisdictions possessing the highest arrest rates for marijuana offenses are the District to Columbia (729 arrests per 100,000 citizens), New York (577), Louisiana (451), Illinois (447) and Nebraska (421). District of Columbia lawmakers decriminalized the adult possession of marijuana earlier this month.

The two states possessing the lowest marijuana arrest rates are California and Massachusetts, the report found. Both states decriminalized marijuana possession offenses in recent years.

Stated the report’s author, Shenondoah University professor Jon Gettman, “After a generation of marijuana arrests, nearly 19 million and counting since 1981, the results are that marijuana remains widely used, not perceived as risky by a majority of the population, and widely available. The tremendous variance in use and arrests at the state level demonstrate why marijuana prohibition has failed and is not a viable national policy.”

Full text of the report is available on the NORML website here or from: RegulatingCannabis.com.

– See more at: http://blog.norml.org/2014/07/30/study-arrests-for-marijuana-offenses-increasing-in-many-states/#sthash.l9sfun7e.MOcw3eNJ.dpuf

PRESS RELEASE: GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH of KENTUCKY has added BOWLING GREEN to the VENUE!

May 1, 2014 –

As of this morning BOWLING GREEN KENTUCKY will be hosting a “GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH”

ON SUNDAY MAY 4TH!!!

PER “BOBBIE SEXTON”  AT PERMITS OFFICE IN BOWLING GREEN, KY A PERMIT IS NOT NEEDED HERE TO HAVE THIS MARCH.

 

SO EVERYONE WHO IS IN BOWLING GREEN CAN COME TO LOUISVILLE ON SATURDAY AND THEN

GET TWICE THE FUN WHEN THEY GO TO THEIR OWN BOWLING GREEN MARCH ON SUNDAY!

COME OUT AND ENJOY YOUR RIGHT TO FREE SPEECH!

THE ROUTE IS AS FOLLOWS:

*BEGINNING AT LIBRARY ON STATE STREET

*CONTINUE TO OLD COURTHOUSE

*CONTINUE TO THE NEW JUSTICE CENTER

*CONTINUE TO FEDERAL COURTHOUSE

*CONTINUE BACK AROUND FOUNTAIN SQUARE TO LIBRARY.

MEETUP AT 10:00 AM CST IN FRONT OF LIBRARY ON STATE STREET FOR MARCH TO BEGIN PROMPTLY AT 11:00 AM!!!!

*NO ILLEGAL ACTIVIES ALLOWED

*EVERYONE MUSH STAY WITHIN SIDEWALKS AND HONOR TRAFFIC SIGNALS.

THE WEATHER PROMISES A GOOD DAY SO COME ON OUT AND ENJOY!

HOSTED BY:

81714601-2c13-4e1d-aa5b-079ad3bcc630     DIVERSE SANCTUARY

SPONSORED BY:

ModernFarmConcepts

**FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS EVENT CONTACT REV. MARY SPEARS OF DIVERSE SANCTUARY AT 270-904-0279

Clemency to Jeff Mizanskey: Life without parole for marijuana

Clemency to Jeff Mizanskey: Life without parole for marijuana

This petition will be delivered to:  Missouri, Gov. Jeremiah Nixon

Petition by  Chris Mizanskey  Sedalia, MO

My father Jeff Mizanskey has been in prison for 20 years and has no possibility of parole. For non-violent, marijuana-only offenses, my father has been sentenced to die in prison because of a “three strikes” mandatory sentencing policy in the State of Missouri.

Dad’s first offense was in 1984 when he sold an ounce to an undercover informant, and then was found to possess a half pound of marijuana when police raided his house the next day.  His next offense occurred in 1991, when he was caught in possession of a couple of ounces. But for my father’s final strike in 1993, he became an easy fall guy in a conspiracy to distribute marijuana. My dad was driving a friend to a deal that turned out to be a sting operation. All of the other convicted men involved were set free years ago, but my dad was given a virtual death sentence.

My dad is, and always has been, a good man. He taught my brother and I all about construction and a good work ethic. He has never been violent and he is a model prisoner. And over the 20 years he has been in that little cell, he has watched as violent criminals, rapists, and murderers have “paid their debts” and left – sometimes just to return a few months later.

My father is 61 years old, and has been in prison since he was 41. His parents – my grandparents – have since passed. While my dad has been trapped behind bars, generations of kids and grandkids have been born into our family who have never even met the man. The State of Missouri spends roughly $22,000/year to keep him locked up. Meanwhile all my dad wants to do is be a productive part of society, work and pay taxes, be with his family. And I want my dad back.

Governor Jay Nixon is the only person who has the power to bring my dad home by granting clemency to Jeff and calling 20 years punishment enough. Please help us reach a just and reasonable end to his prison sentence by signing and sharing this petition.

To:
Gov. Jeremiah Nixon, Missouri

Jeff Mizanskey is a non-violent, marijuana-only offender who has spent the last 20 years in a Missouri prison. He has been sentenced to be there for the rest of his life, and he has no opportunity for parole. The only hope he has to ever to become a working member of society or to hold his grandchildren in his hands is for you to grant him clemency.

His sentence was imposed because of the Prior and Persistent Drug Offender sentencing structure which requires life in prison without parole for his three felony marijuana-only offenses.
Jeff Mizanskey has never committed violence and is most certainly a model prisoner. For 20 years he has sat behind bars, only to watch as rapists and murders come and go and sometimes come back again. Meanwhile the State of Missouri spends roughly $22,000 annually to house him – over $400,000 has been spent so far.

 
On February 3, 2011, Missouri Supreme Court Chief Justice William Ray Price, Jr., delivered his final State of the Judiciary address to the Missouri General Assembly. In that speech, Chief Justice Price lambasted Missouri’s “three strikes” drug-sentencing laws as enormously costly and ineffective. “Punishment,” Price said, “is a necessary part of our criminal justice system. But our real goal for nonviolent offenders is to teach them their lesson so they can become productive law-abiding members of our society. The goal is not to lock them into a life of crime, to make them permanent wards of the state.”
Jeff Mizanskey has been punished for 20 years. He has learned his lesson and wants to become a productive, law-abiding member of our society. The goal Price mentions has been more than reached, and it is time to give Jeff back his life.

On July 6, 2012, you signed the Justice Reinvestment Act, which was intended to reduce our prison population, save the state money, and ensure that punishments are proportional to violations for non-violent offenders. While this has done a great deal of good for so many Missourians, Jeff’s status has remained unchanged.
In October 2013, Gallup released a poll showing 58% of Americans support marijuana legalization. 58% of Americans recognize the principle that imprisoning Jeff Mizanskey for the rest of his life has no net positive social benefit.

In the spirit of the Justice Reinvestment Act and in the spirit of justice itself, please grant clemency to Jeff Mizanskey today. Please pardon Jeff Mizanskey so that he does not die in prison just for marijuana.

PLEASE CONTINUE TO LINK TO SIGN PETITION!

On “Legalization”: When the U.N. comes a marching along, we will all be singing a brand new song…

 

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January 2, 2014

The following synopsis which I have found across the internet and put together here pretty much sums up the value of our “legalization” initiatives, whether they be “anti-prohibition”, tax and regulate, Repeal, ‘…”my God given right!”, or “Damn, we are all a bunch of fools to think that prohibition has ended…”.

With the passage of the new recreational and medical cannabis use laws in Colorado and Washington alongside all of the other “medical cannabis” states, everyone is/was jumping for joy at midnight on the 31st of December 2013.  Prohibition has ended they proclaim, yet still remains illegal at the Federal and U.N. levels.  The U.N. has already jumped on the bandwagon prior to the new year to make sure that Uruguay’s legalization was “in violation of international law”.

The Executive Branch of our U.S. Government seems to be just sitting back and watching, never giving a clear indication of what they will (or won’t) do.   In fact, they just do not seem to be doing much of anything anymore with the exception of disagreements on what should be done. 

Maybe, just maybe it is because they know something we may not.  Maybe, they know that we are truly walking in the age of the NWO and the Global takeover by the U.N.  It has already been written in stone and now we just sit back and watch what is going to happen.  The U.N. is in control.  The U.S. is not.  The U.N. owns the World.  We do not.  No one owns anything, anywhere, anymore.  Including the right to our own bodies and minds.  The U.N. does.  Even the thought that we actually had a chance to control our own lives is not very lucid.  The U.S. and every other country within the U.N. are incorporated businesses with “us” as the “stock certificates”.  Here are a few links to information on that:

UNITED STATES THE CORPORATION:THE TRUTH

King James 1st Chacter of Virgina of 1606 / Act of 1871

CORPORATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

UNITED STATED OF AMERICA is a CORPORATION PR

Moving right along, New Year’s Eve 2013 will be one for the history books.  Though I doubt actual hardcopy books will exist very much longer and the history can now be changed at the tap of a keyboard, so what that is worth I am not sure.  But I know I sure feel sorry for the people who are out there actually believing that they have accomplished anything with their legalization antics.  We have all led ourselves into a hole.  I damn sure hope it is not too late to climb out of it. 

So hear my happy New Year’s Song,

I saw it coming all along,

Yes I did, I know I did,

I sure the Hell saw it coming before YOU did!

So now your free, or so you think,

To smoke your pipe and drink your drink,

The Bell’s were ringing the whole damn time!

Why did you not listen?

Why did you not try?

To educate the masses, by pointing a finger in their eye?

Why did we wait so long,

That the whole damn illusion of freedom,

Flew by, said goodbye, and then was fucking gone?

@SMKRIDER

March 30, 2005

United Nations biosphere reserve land grabs

By Nathan Tabor
What do the Statue of Liberty, Independence Hall, and Monticello have in common? The average American with a smattering of historical knowledge might say that those historic sites are all symbolic of America’s unique heritage of freedom.
Monticello, of course, was the home of Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence. That document (as well as the U.S. Constitution, later) was signed in Independence Hall. The Statue of Liberty memorializes the free nation under God that those founding documents created.
What about the Great Smoky Mountains, Yellowstone Park, and the Grand Canyon? Well, these priceless natural resources are all managed by the U.S. National Parks Service. They are among the most frequently visited natural recreation areas in America, where millions of American families vacation every year.
Would it surprise you to learn that every one of these unique American landmarks is also controlled by the United Nations?

December 11, 2013

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crimes has called Uruguay’s reforms ‘unfortunate,’ saying the country acted in violation of international law.

…”VIOLATION OF INTERNATIONAL LAW”.

 

Friday, 13 December 2013 18:30

UN Claims Uruguay Not Allowed to End Marijuana Prohibition

…”NOT ALLOWED…”

 

…”The 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, of which Uruguay and 183 other nations are parties, “aims to combat drug abuse by coordinated international action.”

Marijuana is listed alongside heroin as a Schedule VI substance according to the Convention, the most severe designation outlined by the U.N.’s International Narcotics Review Board.

The Schedule VI designation empowers member states to, “adopt any special measures of control which in its opinion are necessary having regard to the particularly dangerous properties of a drug so included.”

 

…”In the United States, the administration has so far refused to entirely acknowledge the legitimacy of state nullification efforts on the issue. However, despite strong warnings and opposition from the UN, the Justice Department adopted “guidelines” this year purporting to allow regulated marijuana-market schemes to move forward under close federal scrutiny. Whether national governments will continue to defy the increasingly power hungry UN remains to be seen, but according to analysts, it appears that the planetary outfit will eventually end up on the losing side of the prohibition battle.”

Alex Newman, a foreign correspondent for The New American, is normally based in Europe. He can be reached at [email protected].

 

December 13, 2013

Confronting Converging Threats and the Dark Shadows of the Global Economy: Preventing Downward Spirals of Chaos, Insecurity, and Instability

…”The illegal economy includes narcotics trafficking, wildlife trafficking, human trafficking, illegal logging, counterfeit consumer goods and medications, and other illicit enterprises. It is a network of shadowy markets in which illegal arms brokers and narcotics kingpins act as the new CEOs and venture capitalists….”

 

…”The growing illegal economy supports and enables corrupt officials, criminals, terrorists, and insurgents to mingle and conduct business with another. We must build our own networks to fight these illicit networks and break their corruptive influence…”

 

…”corruption and crime exist in every corner of the globe. So do terrorism and climate change. They occur in many of our communities, and on those occasions when they converge, they can bring disorder and instability. In this scenario, shadowy markets, criminal entrepreneurs, and illicit networks could become de facto service providers as governments collapse and chaos and insecurity increase, and in the worst case scenario, prey on the victims of pandemics, storms, and other disasters…”

…”We must build a community of responsible governments, businesses, and civil society organizations, working together to build market resiliency, safeguard government integrity, and preserve our common security.”

…”The United States has recently taken steps to make countering the convergence of illicit threats a national security priority. On July 25, 2011, the White House released the Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime: Addressing Converging Threats to National Security, which aims to protect Americans and citizens of partner nations from violence and exploitation at the hands of transnational criminal networks.”

 

…”Of growing concern are illicit financial hubs and their potentially complicit banks and market-based facilitators and super fixers—such as corrupt lawyers, accountants, black market procurers of commodities and services,…”

 

…”Moving forward, the United States will continue to build collaborative partnerships and knowledge-based platforms with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), the World Bank, the G8/G20, INTERPOL, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), World Customs Organization (WCO), the European Union, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum (APEC), Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Organization of American States (OAS), African Union (AU), and other regional and sub-regional bodies.”

 

…”We also need to better coordinate diplomatic efforts to identify and uproot safe havens and exploitable sanctuaries that enable criminals, terrorists, and other illicit actors and networks to corrupt governments, access illegal markets, and stage operations without fear of reprisal from law enforcement.”

 

…”Some of the thinking and research which helped to inform our dialogues on combating crime-terror pipelines can be found in a book published in May 2013 by the National Defense University, Convergence: Illicit Networks and National Security in the Age of Globalization.

Promoting the consistent application of the international drug control treaties

In discharging its mandate under the international drug control treaties, the Board maintains an ongoing dialogue with Governments through various means, such as regular consultations and country missions. That dialogue has been instrumental to the Board’s efforts to assist Governments in complying with the provisions of the treaties. The Convention Evaluation Section of the INCB Secretariat assists the Board in these task. In addition, the Section publishes the quarterly Newsletter of INCB.

The International Narcotics Control Board

From left: A. Samak, W. Sipp, F. Thoumi, M. Moinard, S. Suryawati, R. Yans, G. Korchagina, V. Sumyai, W. Hall,
D. Johnson, R. Ray

 

INTERPOL “CONNECTING POLICE FOR A SAFER WORLD”

 

United States

INTERPOL-Washington-Operations-and-Command-Center

INTERPOL Washington Operations and Command Center

Based on principles embodied in its Constitution, there is no single, national police agency in the United States of America. Instead, a decentralized network of nearly 18,000 different agencies enforces criminal laws according to their respective jurisdiction and mission, which may be local, state, federal or tribal.

Local police and sheriff departments, which make up the majority of national law enforcement agencies, perform traditional functions, including:

  • Crime prevention, detection and investigation;
  • Criminal incident response;
  • Responding to calls for assistance;
  • Patrol;
  • Arrest of criminal suspects;
  • Execution of warrants;
  • Traffic control;
  • Accident investigation;
  • Drug enforcement;
  • Crime prevention education.

At federal level, more than 65 separate agencies enforce Congress laws with a view to:

  • Fighting organized crime and terrorist networks;
  • Conducting foreign intelligence operations;
  • Investigating financial and cyber offences;
  • Tackling child exploitation and trafficking in human beings;
  • Tackling drug trafficking;
  • Preventing the smuggling of illicit goods;
  • Controlling borders and maintaining national security.

INTERPOL Washington

Domestic Focus…International Reach

The National Central Bureau (NCB) for the United States of America is the unique designated INTERPOL point of contact, acting on behalf of the Attorney General, the chief law enforcement officer of the United States.

INTERPOL Washington supports US law enforcement agencies and other INTERPOL member countries who seek assistance in criminal investigations which go beyond national borders. INTERPOL Washington coordinates national law enforcement action and response, ensuring that it is consistent with national interests and law, as well as with INTERPOL policies, procedures, and regulations.

INTERPOL Washington is composed of a multi-sector workforce which includes full-time employees, contractors, and personnel seconded from more than 20 local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. The staff includes senior criminal investigators, analysts, attorneys, information technology specialists and administrative support personnel.

Organization

At the core of INTERPOL Washington’s criminal investigative support activities is the Operations and Command Center (IOCC). It provides a permanent communications interface between domestic and international law enforcement partners, as well as support to its operational divisions, namely:

  • Alien / Fugitive Division;
  • Counterterrorism Division;
  • Drugs Division;
  • Economic Crimes Division;
  • Human Trafficking and Child Protection Division;
  • State and Local Liaison Division;
  • Violent Crimes Division.

Strategic Goals

INTERPOL Washington has developed four strategic goals to promote cooperation and support to its national law enforcement community and foreign counterparts:

  • Combat transnational crime and terrorism;
  • Strengthen the security of America’s borders;
  • Facilitate international law enforcement cooperation and partnerships;
  • Cultivate and develop America’s workforce, management, and operations.

These goals are in keeping with the strategic priorities of Americas Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security and INTERPOL.  They reflect the investigative interests of partner law enforcement agencies, and provide the framework for international investigative assistance that is critical to preventing and solving transnational crime.

Agencies represented at INTERPOL Washington
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives;
  • Capitol Police;
  • Citizenship and Immigration Service;
  • Coast Guard;
  • Customs and Border Protection;
  • Department of Defense, U.S. Marine Corps;
  • Department of Homeland Security;
  • Department of Justice, Office of Enforcement Operations;
  • Department of State;
  • Drug Enforcement Administration;
  • Environmental Protection Agency;
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation;
  • Fish and Wildlife Service;
  • Food and Drug Administration;
  • Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General;
  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement;
  • Internal Revenue Service;
  • Marshals Service;
  • New York Police Department;
  • Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office;
  • Postal Inspection Service;
  • Secret Service.

“Tribal police are officers hired by native American tribes which have a constitutional government on Reservations.  They work closely with local, state, and federal police agencies”

15 December 2010

INTERPOL and United States Federal Law Enforcement Training Center hold advanced police technology and research exercise

History

The idea of INTERPOL was born in 1914 at the First International Criminal Police Congress, held in Monaco. This meeting brought together police officers and judicial representatives from 14 countries in order to find ways to cooperate across borders.

Over the past 100 years, the idea of international police cooperation has become firmly grounded in practice, with 190 countries now members of INTERPOL. While its  vision and mission remain in line with the original goals of the first meeting in 1914, the Organization continues to evolve in response to the needs of its member countries, the emergence of new crime trends, and innovations in technology.

The State vs. Joshua E.Mason (TN) (Please help this family in Tennessee)

 

PLEASE HELP OUR FAMILY
I am facing 15 years in prison away from my young daughter and family for growing cannabis in TN
. I am asking for HELP in defending myself in court against these charges.

To make a long and exhausting story short, I was growing cannabis and a friend betrayed me and turned me into law enforcement. I use cannabis as a medicine for a variety of ailments.

I also helped other people who were in need of quality cannabis medicines. When we were raided we had a small amount of flowering plants and cutting for other patients who

wanted to grow their own medicine.

Upon learning of my medical garden law enforcement stormed my home while our family slept. They violently stormed our home with assault rifles drawn and held me face down

in a puddle of dog urine after they literally scared the pee out of my dog. My child was present and was subject to watching the entire episode. It is an unnecessary military tactic

that was used to intimidate and scare our family that will stay with my daughter forever.

Law enforcement continued to search for “guns and bombs” but they found nothing more than a well-kept medical cannabis garden, which I showed them voluntarily after they stated they had a warrant to search the premises (I was never shown a warrant). They found nothing beyond cannabis in their search of the premises.

 
I was released on a $39,000 bond and informed I did not qualify for a public defender. I was told to return with counsel. I was able to put a $1,000 payment down on an attorney. Upon returning to court I was informed that a public defender was now willing to speak to me. A female public defender took me in a room and informed me that the DA was willing to offer me a $500 fine and probation. I was ecstatic and immediately informed them I would take the offer.

In a bizarre twist, upon learning I had retained other counsel, the public defender tore up the deal in front of me and stated, “Oh…I see you have a lawyer. This deal is no good.” I was crushed.
My attorney was able to get me a deal for $4,000 and if I cannot pay it the state will press forward with charges. To add insult to industry, I received a $54,000 fine from the TN department of revenue for unpaid taxes on the cannabis I grew.

I am asking for money to pay my fine and keep me with my family, so I can continue to look for work. I appreciate any and all help you can afford, to help me avoid prison for cannabis. I am a hard-working family man who looks forward to putting this past me and moving on to the next chapter of my life.

Thanks for your time and consideration.
Regards, Josh Mason and Family

ps.the deal was .donate $4000+ to the drug fund and get a misdemeanor and a $500 fine.don’t donate $4000+ and they will revoke my bond put me in jail and try me for the max 15 years

 

RIA awarded five NIH grants totaling more than $6 million

RIA building

UB’s Research Institute on Addictions is located on Main Street in downtown Buffalo.

 

By SARA R. SALDI

Published August 22, 2013

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“Given the current funding climate, only the most outstanding research projects are being funded.”

Kenneth Leonard, director

Research Institute on Addictions

UB’s Research Institute on Addictions (RIA) recently was awarded more than $6 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health to fund five innovative studies that will expand knowledge on societal ramifications of drug and alcohol use.

The studies cover a wide range of alcohol- and drug-related topics. Three studies focus on youth issues, including bullying and its relationship to substance use, energy drinks mixed with alcohol and their connection to risky sexual practices, and the effects of parental drinking on children of alcoholics.

The remaining grants focus on marijuana-induced aggression and partner violence, and understanding physical craving in substance abuse recovery.

RIA Director Kenneth Leonard is extremely pleased that RIA has been recognized for its hard work and excellence in research.

“The number and size of these grants represent a remarkable achievement for RIA and our talented researchers,” Leonard says. “Given the current funding climate, only the most outstanding research projects are being funded.”

Jennifer Livingston

Jennifer Livingston

Jennifer Livingston, RIA senior research scientist, was awarded $1.8 million over five years from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) to study “Peer Victimization as a Pathway to Adolescent Substance Use.”

Livingston says that although there is clearly the potential of peer victimization (PV) (bullying and sexual harassment) to cause harm, not all adolescents suffer serious effects from such experiences. Little is known about the conditions under which PV causes harm.

“This study aims to discover the conditions under which PV contributes to emotional distress and substance use among adolescents, both immediately and over time” says Livingston. “We’re also seeking to identify the circumstances that might curb the long-term effects of PV, particularly as they relate to the development of emotional distress and substance-use problems.”

Kathleen Miller

Kathleen Miller

The NIAAA also awarded $1.37 million to Kathleen Miller, RIA senior research scientist, to fund her study, “Alcohol and Energy Drink Use, Expectancies and Sexual Risk Taking.”

Miller, a nationally renowned expert on the subject of alcohol mixed with energy drinks, says that although energy drinks have been widely available in the U.S. for more than a decade, their effects remain significantly understudied.

“This study will collect the first detailed, nationally representative data on the prevalence of energy drinks (ED) and alcohol mixed with energy drink (AED) use by youth,” says Miller, “and will map the differences in use across gender, race/ethnicity, age, college-enrollment status and sports involvement, as well as examine the links between AED use and sexual risk taking. We will then seek to understand how gender differences affect these relationships.”

Rina Das Eiden

Rina Das Eiden

Rina Das Eiden, RIA senior research scientist, received more than $400,000 from the NIAAA for a two-year study, “Early Childhood Predictors of Adolescent Substance Use in a High Risk Sample.”

Eiden, an expert on the prenatal effects of substance use, says that though children of alcoholics (COAs) are a large and critical component of the underage drinking population, little is known about how alcohol affects parenting and what the predictive risks are for underage drinking and substance use among COAs.

“Knowledge about predictors of substance use—beginning in infancy—is crucial for determining and developing early intervention to address substance-use risk among COAs,” she says.

Maria Testa

Maria Testa

A $1.86 million grant was made by the National Institute on Drug Addiction (NIDA) to Maria Testa, RIA senior research scientist, for her study titled “Proximal Effects of Marijuana in Understanding Intimate Partner Violence.” The study will take place over four years.

Testa says that despite the commonly held belief that marijuana suppresses aggression, many studies have found a positive association between marijuana use and intimate-partner violence.

“Although marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States—with increases in rates of usage over the past few years—there is a lack of research regarding marijuana use and aggression,” says Testa. “Understanding the contribution of marijuana to the occurrence of domestic violence has important public health implications.”

Her research will address this gap in knowledge by examining the effects of marijuana use in couples and the consequences for their relationships.

Robert Schlauch

Robert Schlauch

Robert Schlauch, senior research scientist, received nearly $600,000 from the NIAAA for his project, “Ambivalence Model of Craving: Re-Examining the Craving-Drinking Relationship.”

This five-year study aims to improve understanding of the ways in which craving impacts positive treatment outcomes. The research specifically will examine how craving processes change over the course of recovery, including their influence on starting and maintaining treatment.

“Greater understanding of craving processes during the course of recovery has the potential to inform current treatment strategies,” he says. “Craving is a complex experience requiring consideration of many factors, including both desires to use (approach) and desires not to use (avoidance).”

CONTINUE READING…

JEFF EDELSTEIN: Marijuana defense of the NJWeedman is working

 

Bobby T. is a 27-year-old Philadelphia resident. He’s got a good job, a regular guy, goes about his business. Not looking for any trouble. But — cue the music — trouble found him.

He was driving back to his home from upstate New York after a weekend with some friends. Upon entering New Jersey — Mahwah, to be exact — he got pulled over. The officer said he was doing 76 in a 55. Lousy enough luck there. And the luck got worse once the officer got a whiff of the car.

Pot.
“He smelled the weed,” Bobby T. said. “He told me to get out of the car, asked me where it was, and I told him. He found my bowl and about 2.5 grams of pot.”

Bobby T. was handcuffed and arrested.

It was going to be a slam dunk case for the township of Mahwah. Bobby T. was dead to rights. And then … well, long story short: Bobby T. walked. Didn’t have to pay a dime. Case dismissed.

How did he pull this off? Simple enough: Through the dare-I-say brilliance of Ed Forchion, known far and wide as the NJWeedman.

I wrote about this   earlier in the year. Forchion has created   a printable, fill-in-the-blanks legal brief for anyone in New Jersey who gets caught with marijuana. His argument is as elegant as it is airtight.

CONTINUE READING….

Rand Paul: Marijuana users lose IQ points and lack motivation

By Eric W. Dolan / Monday, June 17, 2013 22:18 EDT

Rand Paul screenshot

Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) said Monday he did not support the legalization of marijuana, though he did support some form of decriminalization.

“What I think is that if your kid or one of his friends goes out and gets caught with marijuana, sticking them in prison is a big mistake,” he told Peter Robinson of the Hoover Institution. “So I don’t really believe in prison sentences for these minor non-violent drug offenses, but I’m not willing to go all the way to say it is a good idea either. I think people who use marijuana all the time lose IQ points, I think they lose their drive to show up for work.”

Paul, however, added that he believed individual states should be allowed to decide whether they wanted to legalize marijuana or not.

Much to the chagrin of his libertarian supporters, Paul has said he doesn’t support drug legalization. Despite Paul’s lack of support for legalization, many drug policy reformers view him as an ally because of his support for legislation to scale back the war on drugs.

During the Hoover Institution interview, Paul also said he supported overturning the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. He said abortion as well as same-sex marriage should be issues for the states to decide.

Watch video, courtesy of the Wall Street

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President’s pot comments prompt call for policy

 

FILE - This Nov. 8, 2012 file photo shows marijuana plants flourishing under the lights at a grow house in Denver. President Barack Obama says he won't go after Washington state and Colorado for legalizing marijuana. In a Barbara Walters interview airing Friday on ABC, Obama is asked whether he supports making pot legal. He says, "I wouldn't go that far." (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)

 

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — President Barack Obama says he won’t go after pot users in Colorado and Washington, two states that just legalized the drug for recreational use. But advocates argue the president said the same thing about medical marijuana — and yet U.S. attorneys continue to force the closure of dispensaries across the U.S.

Welcome to the confusing and often conflicting policy on pot in the U.S., where medical marijuana is legal in many states, but it is increasingly difficult to grow, distribute or sell it. And at the federal level, at least officially, it is still an illegal drug everywhere.

Obama’s statement Friday provided little clarity in a world where marijuana is inching ever so carefully toward legitimacy.

That conflict is perhaps the greatest in California, where the state’s four U.S. Attorneys criminally prosecuted large growers and launched a coordinated crackdown on the state’s medical marijuana industry last year by threatening landlords with property forfeiture actions. Hundreds of pot shops went out of business.

Steve DeAngelo, executive director of an Oakland, Calif., dispensary that claims to be the nation’s largest, called for a federal policy that treats recreational and medical uses of the drug equally.

"If we’re going to recognize the rights of recreational users, then we should certainly protect the rights of medical cannabis patients who legally access the medicine their doctors have recommended," he said.

The government is planning to soon release policies for dealing with marijuana in Colorado and Washington, where federal law still prohibits pot, as elsewhere in the country.

"It would be nice to get something concrete to follow," said William Osterhoudt, a San Francisco criminal defense attorney representing government officials in Mendocino County who recently received a demand from federal investigators for detailed information about a local system for licensing growers of medical marijuana.

Assemblyman Tom Ammiano said he was frustrated by Obama’s comments because the federal government continues to shutter dispensaries in states with medical marijuana laws, including California.

"A good step here would be to stop raiding those legal dispensaries who are doing what they are allowed to do by law," said the San Francisco Democrat. "There’s a feeling that the federal government has gone rogue on hundreds of legal, transparent medical marijuana dispensaries, so there’s this feeling of them being in limbo. And it puts the patients, the businesses and the advocates in a very untenable place."

Obama, in an interview with ABC’s Barbara Walters, said Friday that federal authorities have "bigger fish to fry" when it comes to targeting recreational pot smokers in Colorado and Washington.

Some advocates said the statement showed the president’s willingness to allow residents of states with marijuana laws to use the drug without fear of federal prosecution.

"It’s a tremendous step forward," said Joe Elford, general counsel for Americans for Safe Access. "It suggests the feds are taking seriously enough the idea that there should be a carve-out for states with marijuana laws."

Obama’s statements on recreational use mirror the federal policy toward states that allow marijuana use for medical purposes.

"We are not focusing on backyard grows with small amounts of marijuana for use by seriously ill people," said Lauren Horwood, a spokeswoman for U.S. Attorney Benjamin Wagner in Sacramento. "We are targeting money-making commercial growers and distributors who use the trappings of state law as cover, but they are actually abusing state law."

Alison Holcomb, who led the legalization drive in Washington state, said she doesn’t expect Obama’s comment to prompt the federal government to treat recreational marijuana and medical marijuana differently.

"At this point, what the president is looking at is a response to marijuana in general. The federal government has never recognized the difference between medical and non-medical marijuana," she said. "I don’t think this is the time he’d carve out separate policies. I think he’s looking for a more comprehensive response."

Washington voters approved a medical marijuana law in 1998, and dispensaries have proliferated across the state in recent years.

Last year, Gov. Chris Gregoire vetoed legislation that would have created a state system for licensing medical dispensaries over concern that it would require state workers to violate the federal Controlled Substances Act.

For the most part, dispensaries in western Washington have been left alone. But federal authorities did conduct raids earlier this year on dispensaries they said were acting outside the state law, such as selling marijuana to non-patients. Warning letters have been sent to dispensaries that operate too close to schools.

"What we’ve seen is enforcement of civil laws and warnings, with a handful of arrests of people who were operating outside state law," Holcomb said.

Eastern Washington has seen more raids because the U.S. attorney there is more active, Holcomb added.

Colorado’s marijuana measure requires lawmakers to allow commercial pot sales, and a state task force that will begin writing those regulations meets Monday.

State officials have reached out to the Justice Department seeking help on regulating a new legal marijuana industry but haven’t heard back.

DeAngelo said Friday that the Justice Department should freeze all pending enforcement actions against legal medical cannabis providers and review its policies to make sure they’re consistent with the president’s position. He estimated federal officials have shuttered 600 dispensaries in the state and 1,000 nationwide.

DeAngelo’s Harborside Health Center is facing eviction after the U.S. attorney in San Francisco pressured his landlord to stop harboring what the government considers an illegal business.

"While it’s nice to hear these sorts of positive words from the president, we are facing efforts by the Justice Department to shut us down, so it’s hard for me to take them seriously," DeAngelo said.

The dispensary has a hearing Thursday in federal court on the matter.

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Associated Press writers Terry Collins in San Francisco and Manuel Valdes in Seattle contributed to this report.

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Rand Paul: Relax Marijuana Penalties, Allow States To Determine Pot Policy

 

 

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) continued to field questions this week about a possible entrance into the 2016 Republican presidential mix, reinforcing his views that legal penalties for marijuana offenses should be reduced and that states should be responsible for crafting their own laws regarding the plant.

In an interview with ABC, Paul said that while he did not personally support marijuana being legalized, or even used, for that matter, he did believe that punishments surrounding it were overly harsh.

"I think for example we should tell young people, ‘I’m not in favor of you smoking pot, but if you get caught smoking pot, I don’t want to put you in jail for 20 years,’" Paul said.

The senator went on to argue that states such as Washington and Colorado, which both voted to legalize and tax marijuana earlier this month, should be permitted to have their moves stand, despite running contrary to federal laws determining the drug to be an illegal substance.

"States should be allowed to make a lot of these decisions," Paul said. "I want things to be decided more at a local basis, with more compassion. I think it would make us as Republicans different."

He made similar comments in an earlier interview with Politico, saying that he planned to reach across the aisle to Senate Democrats in hopes of addressing his concerns with marijuana sentencing legislatively.

Both Paul and his father, retiring Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), have been outspoken proponents of states’ rights and compassion when it comes to marijuana laws. They’ve also both been avid supporters of legalizing the production of industrial hemp, a non-psychoactive relative of marijuana that has been caught up in the wider net of drug laws.

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