Tag Archives: medical marijuana

How The ‘Cannabis Catch-22’ Keeps Marijuana Classified As A Harmful Drug

 

Marijuana grows in the home of two medical marijuana patients in Medford, Ore.

America has a long and storied history with marijuana. Once grown by American colonists to make hemp rope, by 1970, it was classified as a Schedule 1 narcotic. Possession of it was — and is — a federal crime, despite the fact that in recent years 25 states have legalized medical marijuana and four states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis for recreational use.

Author John Hudak, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, traces the history of America’s laws and attitudes toward cannabis in his new book, Marijuana: A Short History. He tells Fresh Air‘s Dave Davies that the recent shift in public policy is, in part, a recognition of the drug’s medicinal value, which became apparent in San Francisco during the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

“People were saying, ‘If I smoke this and I get the munchies, maybe it will help people dying of AIDS who are so nauseated that they can’t eat and they’re dealing with clinical anorexia as a result of that,’ ” Hudak explains.

The grass-roots movement turned political, and in 1996, California became the first state to pass a medical marijuana ballot initiative. Other states followed, though the impetus for the movement grew beyond the medicinal.

“One significant argument in favor of adult use marijuana that not many people talk about is a simple one, and that is some people just like to get high,” Hudak says. “I think in this policy debate, oftentimes seeing marijuana as a recreational product, it is frowned upon to discuss it, but it’s a reality. People enjoy it like people enjoy wine or people enjoy a good steak.”


Interview Highlights

On Harry Anslinger, who played a pivotal role in the effort to criminalize marijuana

Harry Anslinger was the nation’s first real drug czar. He came from the Bureau of Prohibition and was put in charge of a variety of federal government agencies that changed names over the course of time, but were effectively the precursors for the Drug Enforcement [Administration].

He was essentially the J. Edgar Hoover of drugs in the United States. He had the same types of tactics that Hoover had — that was being very aggressive with Congress, going into the media to try to advance his political and policy interests. He had, by all accounts, details and histories of members of Congress and senators that they did not want to become public, and he was a one-man force in expanding drug prohibition in the United States. He did this for a variety of drugs, but he had a special place in his heart for marijuana.

On how marijuana use was made into a racial issue

Anslinger brought to it this real racialized aspect. I mean, he was an absolute avowed racist, and when you look at the letters he wrote to different civic organizations or op-eds that he published, or even congressional testimony, it is riddled with racist language and racist claims about the use of marijuana really being only in Mexican communities in the Southwest, and then eventually it transitioned to be a product that was used by the individuals who were around jazz music, which of course was code language for the African-American community.

And so proceeded this racialized history, and [Anslinger] … claimed that marijuana would turn people into psychopaths, murderers, rapists — it would make women promiscuous, particularly promiscuous around men of color, and this was seen as something that was brought into communities by people of color in order to make the most vulnerable in society behave in ways that would appall society.

On government efforts to suppress studies that showed that marijuana was not as addictive or dangerous as had been claimed

In the 1970s President Nixon commissioned the former governor of Pennsylvania, Ray Shafer, who was a good friend, a fellow Republican, a good friend of Nixon’s, to commission this report about this evil drug infecting society, and Shafer came up, again, with the same answers — it wasn’t as addicting, that there were reasons to try to think about this drug in different ways than the federal government was thinking about it, that it wasn’t causing violent crime.

Shafer was actually called into the Oval Office and read off by the president for this draft report, and [Nixon] said to Shafer, “You cannot publish this.” And Shafer stood his ground. He said, “I’m publishing it.” And Nixon trashed that.

It was just this extended period of president after president asking for answers, not getting the answers that he liked, and then throwing the report away.

On what led to policy change for use of marijuana

This really began in the Castro District of San Francisco in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The AIDS epidemic was … ravaging this community, and it was one that individuals, I think, looked at this product that was largely being used recreationally and understood that it helped with pain relief.

So you had a few individuals — Dennis Peron is one; a woman named Brownie Mary who was an orderly at a hospital in San Francisco who would bake brownies laced with marijuana and deliver them to AIDS patients each day. This community popped up around delivering medical cannabis for those who are dying.

And it wasn’t only people dying of AIDS, it was people who had a variety of ailments — and that grass-roots, underground, even though it was pretty much in the daylight for some time, movement transitioned into a political one, and in 1996 California became the first state to pass a medical marijuana ballot initiative.

On arguments in favor of legalization

We have 750,000 arrests in a year that have to do with marijuana. And so in communities of color that criminal justice argument is a tremendous one. For libertarians you talk about personal liberty and privacy and property rights, and that is an important issue for them. For conservatives or liberals who are interested in balancing the budget, talking about all of the law enforcement dollars that are spent on the prosecution and investigation of marijuana crimes in a year, that’s budget savings, as well as revenue in the door on the tax side.

For others, it is about product safety, understanding that a regulatory system is going to be able to test the product and you’ll know exactly as a consumer what you’re getting, whereas on the black market you don’t know that.

On the federal government’s decision this past summer to continue the Schedule 1 classification of marijuana

One of the reasons for the maintenance of marijuana as a Schedule 1 substance was that the medical community is not convinced of its medical value. There are plenty of doctors who believe that there is medical value to marijuana, they’re willing to recommend it to patients, but the threshold required to demonstrate medical value for the medical community as a whole is much higher than it is for the reform community.

There is this cannabis Catch-22 and it is, as a Schedule 1 drug, it is very difficult to do research on the plant. There are only certain researchers who will get the certification and licensure necessary to handle the drug. Then, of course, you need the funding to study it. You need approval from university institutional review boards, and the burdens that exist to do the type of research on a Schedule 1 drug are tremendous. But that research is what will inform the medical community as to its medical use, and so what you need and what you can do are entirely prevented by this federal government policy.

CONTINUE READING INTERVIEW…

Leukaemia and Cannabis Oil: The Story of the Late Ronnie Smith

 

 

Above:  right to left Brian McCullough, Cher Ford McCullough, Richard Rawlings, Heidi Drake and Ronnie Smith aka Roland A Duby, taken at Reefer Rumble in Cincinnati circa 2001

 

One of the all-stars of the cannabis counter culture, Ronnie Lee Smith ranks right up there with Rick Simpson, Jack Herer, and many others. Ronnie, at the age of 47 regretfully passed away in Colorado, on April 3rd 2014. The cause of death is said to be complications from leukaemia.

That’s why Ronnie’s case is particularly important. That’s because Ronnie died of a disease for which he has supposedly treated others in similar situations. Ronnie, with his rocket-scientist in-the-rough intellect, was as familiar to You Tube viewers as Rick Simpson.

I watched several of his videos months earlier. He was the go-to person when a patient needed help in either obtaining Rick Simpson Oil (RSO), or getting safe, reliable advice for their condition. He was also a professional comedian and a radio-show host. He was as compassionate as he was generous.

If you had a cancer and needed RSO, he would provide it at no charge. The true sign of selflessness is giving. He certainly gave and claims to have treated hundreds of patients over the years. He even ran for sheriff in 2010 in Gallatin County Kentucky; indicating that if elected, he would provide free, on demand, cannabis oil to anyone in the county who needed it.

Yet, everyone is asking the same question. If cannabis helps treat leukaemia, why did it fail to treat Ronnie, one of the most ardent supporters of health freedom using cannabis and other alternative strategies in America?

As we know, some families seem particularly prone to cancers of many types. In Ronnie’s family cancer was running wild; his brother Lester died of lymphoma in 2003, his mother died of brain cancer—metastatic from decades of smoking and the development of stage IV lung cancer—which had spread to her brain, three days after his brother died. A couple of years after that, his father died of prostate cancer. Had any of them tried cannabis oil? It did not appear to help, if they had tried it. Which is very disappointing to say the least. But I’m only guessing since there are no further details.

It would be of great benefit to know. I personally am trying to gather a database on the efficacy of marijuana in treating cancers but the existing data is so meagre and disorganized that, for the time being, I cannot make a determination. Those that make wild claims of treating cancers, especially those that actually run dispensaries or “clinics” like the ones located in the Bay Area of California, here in the US, are not willing to share their stories save for a few cases that end up on the internet. They say that they have treated hundreds of end stage cancer victims. If so, please provide the proof we need. Reveal these cases so that others may learn of these treatments. Being secretive does not help our cause.

Ronnie Lee Smith was born on August 20, 1966 at the old St. Elizabeth North Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.

Ronnie and Rick Simpson met around 2006. In 2007, Jack Herer enlisted Ronnie’s formidable brain in editing his now classic forthcoming book The Emperor Wears No Clothes. It was around this time when something odd happened.

After Jack and Ronnie became friends, Ronnie would help out making bubble hash with trimmings from Jack’s grow operation. It was then that Ronnie Lee Smith had discovered cancerous lumps “in between each knuckle”, and “a lump hanging out of my rear.” He next describes an astonishing event. Ronnie continues:

“While making the hash I would eat a spoonful on occasion, and I did that four or five times a day for a couple months. I noticed after a month that the lumps between my knuckles got softer and after 2 months, they were gone. Jack said that he wrote in his book about a college study where they killed cancer in rats with THC in the 70’s. His wife Googled the article and in the search, she found Rick Simpson and the story about the oil. This was 2006, and we called Rick, and Rick turned out to be a big fan of Jacks, so Jack had him on the Jack Herer TV show every week. Rick said he needed someone in America to make oil and I volunteered. He sent me referrals for 3 years before he got stuck in Europe. By 2010, I had cured over 200 people. I decided to run for Sheriff and make the cure available for free to anyone in my county. Ronnie Lee Smith co-starred in the hemp documentary about Jack Herer called [[The Emperor Wears No Clothes]], which was based on his popular book.”

At this point it appears that Ronnie’s leukaemia was in remission. From discovering the nodules between his knuckles in 2006 to the year 2010 he was doing great. By his own admission he had treated over 200 people by then.

Note, before we go any further, that Ronnie had initially used bubble hash which does not involve cooking or the use of heat. Therefore, Ronnie’s initial treatment stemmed from using the carboxylated (the acid) form of THC, CBD and the remaining cannabinoids. This is in sharp contrast to RSO which is a cooked formula and therefore de-carboxylated, and presumably the most powerful variation to take for medical conditions.

In other words, these are very different oils, yet they may possess similar powerful effects. There is continuing debate on the use of acidic forms such as fresh-squeezed marijuana and hashish (eaten) versus the decarboxylated RSO-type preparations. They both seem to have potent curative properties but many insist that cancers be treated with RSO analogues. Most of what I have written about involves RSO or RSO-like essential oils.

So what went wrong? Let’s examine what took place in the months preceding his premature demise.

On April 24, 2013, while driving through Yavapai County, Arizona, Ronnie was pulled over, searched, and arrested for possession of marijuana. The Arizona State Patrol found 2 ounces of marijuana in the trunk of Ronnie’s car, plus cannabis oil (Phoenix Tears AKA RSO). It was during a protracted jail sentence that he was not able to use RSO and this ultimately may have led to his death. Sometime between April and June of 2013, while Ronnie was in the Yavapai County Jail for over 3 months, the State of Arizona never allowed Ronnie to take his medical marijuana to prevent his leukaemia from regenerating.

On February 25, 2014, during a Bobby Pickles podcast, Ronnie Lee Smith explained how his cancer regenerated while he was in the Arizona jail. “I got arrested in Arizona and went to jail for my medical marijuana, which I told the cop was for cancer. So I was in jail for 3 months and developed hardcore leukaemia while I was in there, and then they had rushed me to Emergency Room and got me a [blood] transfusion. That was the only way I got out of jail, because they released me because I was dying and they didn’t want to pay the hospital bill.” … “They finally had to rush me to the hospital for a blood transfusion where they diagnosed me with leukaemia and said I would be dead in 2 weeks.”

As I have written previously some forms of leukaemia appear to be treatable using cannabis oil. The acute leukaemia being more difficult while the chronic forms and the paediatric leukaemia are the easiest to put into remission.

Do not underestimate the power of stress to induce illness or to reverse remissions in cancers. It’s the one problem that most people do not emphasize enough. Stress kills. Here’s a man with a deadly leukaemia which he had been able to keep in remission for at least six years. Now take away his medication and throw him into probably the unhealthiest, stressful, squalid condition possible and watch your cancer grow.

Prison food is notoriously unhealthy. Lacking in micro-nutrients, high in pesticide residues, high in sugars and carbohydrate—the preferred food for cancer cells to grow, and lacking in living nutrients. It’s not too much of a leap to suggest that three months of processed junk food contributed to decreasing his immunity. Add to that lack of sunlight exposure. Vitamin D is a potent anti-cancer hormone.

What I find astonishing is how law enforcement withheld his medication in a medical marijuana state. They knew that it could lead to a regrowth of his cancer and an early demise, yet did nothing.
Lastly there is some speculation that some of the last cannabis oil Ronnie took may have been tainted. Ronnie’s ex-wife presumably had some analysed but there is no further information.

Dr. Christopher Rasmussen

Dr. Christopher Rasmussen

Dr. Christopher Rasmussen MD,MS, an anesthesiologist with a Master’s degree in traditional Chinese medicine, is a professor, lecturer, seminar provider, and world authority on preventive medicine. For more information on preventive medicine see http://www.inflaNATION.com.

CONTINUE READING…

COMPARING THE "CANNABIS ACTS" IN THE KENTUCKY LEGISLATURE…WHAT TO PROMOTE AND WHEN TO SAY NO!

 

KY CANNABIS

 

HB 584(BR-1994)

Tuesday, March 1, 2016 – introduced in House

Create new sections of KRS Chapter 211 to define terms; require the Department for Public Health (DPH) to operate a medical marijuana program; establish a process to license and permit cultivators, distributors, manufacturers, and processors of medical marijuana;

This Bill was just Introduced in House yesterday, March 1.  It is a true-blue highly regulated “medical marijuana” Bill with absolutely NO growing rights for Patients or otherwise!  It is a Bill that is attempting to pacify the group of Kentuckians who do not wish to see any growing rights or recreational rights at all and just want to access Marijuana for purely medical reasons, most are worried about their Children and simply want it for their Children’s sake.  I am all for access to whatever kind of medical CBD or THC that those Children or other patients may need. THIS IS NOT the way to get it!  With over regulation and burdensome legislation the real question is even IF it was enacted, how long would you have to wait to have access to it?  The short answer is, a LONG time.  I will NOT promote this Bill!

It includes but is not limited to the following requirements:

*require the Department for Public Health (DPH) to operate a medical marijuana program

*require prospective patients to possess a diagnosis from a physician and possess a registry identification card issued by the department

*require the department to license no more than 10 grows

*allow for licensure of 2 cultivators, 2 manufacturers, 2 processors, and other subcategories within each economically depressed county participating in the program

*establish a process by which cultivators sell only to manufacturers, processors, or distributors

*allow only distributors to sell medical marijuana to a dispensary

*require the department to publish an annual list of varieties of marijuana that contain a low level of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC);

*require prioritization of low-THC-containing varieties of marijuana by the department;

*grant priority access to children and individuals with medication-resistant seizures to low-THC marijuana;

*require patients under 18 to receive marijuana with a low-THC content;

*clarify that cannabadiol is included in low-THC marijuana products;

*allow a dispensary to dispense cannabadiol regardless of whether it is classified as industrial hemp or medical marijuana;

*establish guidelines for registry identification cards;

Now, if you look at the Bill and think about it a while, what do you think is happening here? 

Kentucky politicians are mostly of the rich, by the rich and for the rich.  They can set up their own tight little growing and dispensing operation which allows NO ONE the option to grow their own for ANY reason, and then they will set up their own little processing and dispensing facilities which is akin to a Monopoly, encumbered with regulation to the hilt so as to prevent any common Citizen from being involved.  I would bet that becoming a “medical marijuana patient” in the State of Kentucky would be about like jumping over fire with flames 10 feet high (no pun intended).  Now, if you succeed at jumping over that flame and in fact end up in the “medical marijuana” program, what type of “medicine” will you be able to receive?  How much will it cost you, because it damn sure is NOT FREE and insurance will not pay for it!   Therefore, that pretty much puts the entire program into the more wealthy “patients” hands, leaving out those who might only be able to access it IF they can grow their own! 

On top of that situation you can imagine that the more wealthy people of Kentucky who have stock in pharmaceutical companies are trying to pave the way for the pharma industry to move right on into Kentucky with their Pharma grade marijuana pills, oils, foods, etc., as soon as it can be accomplished through relaxed Federal Legislation.  Hmmm, this must be why HR 173 is being worked on as we speak.  A “Resolution” to the FDA to “study medical marijuana”!  As if we really need more studies before we use Cannabis….Well, here are a few that the FDA can start copying!  SEE THIS LINK!

Last but not least, this new Bill, if enacted, in fact will promote stiffer penalties for those who are found to be in possession of “non-medically certified marijuana” or without a Patient Registration identification!

If I had a child in need of immediate treatment with Cannabis, and the “Cannabis Freedom Act” does not pass this year, I would pack up and leave — taking my Child to a “legal” State to be treated.  I would not stay here and risk my Child’s health and risk having a Child taken from me for using Marijuana for their illness, when they in fact, NEED it!  There is no reason for them to stay here and take that chance when there are other places to go.  There are also agencies that will help them with relocation if need be! Keep this in mind!

The LINKS below are to the KRS as they exist TODAY.

Any offender failing to affix the appropriate tax stamps, labels, or other tax indicia to any marijuana or controlled substance as required by KRS 138.874 is guilty of a Class C felony

218A.050 Schedule I controlled substances.

218A.1422 Possession of marijuana -Penalty –Maximum term of incarceration.

218A.1421 Trafficking in marijuana –Penalties.

218A.1423 Marijuana cultivation –Penalties

Basically, Possession of marijuana is a Class B misdemeanor, Marijuana cultivation of five (5) or more plants of marijuana is for a first offense a Class D felony,

Trafficking in less than eight (8) ounces of marijuana is for a first offense a Class A misdemeanor.

Kentucky Forfeiture law: 

All real property, including any right, title, and interest in the whole of any lot

or tract of land and any appurtenances or improvements, which is used or

intended to be used, in any manner or part, to commit, or to facilitate the

commission of, a violation of this chapter excluding any misdemeanor

offense relating to marijuana, …

 

SB 13(BR-161)/LM/CI

Wednesday, January 6, 2016 – introduced in Senate

Establish KRS Chapter 245 to regulate the cultivation, testing, processing, taxing, and sale of marijuana to persons aged twenty-one years and older; amend various sections to conform; repeal KRS 218A.1421, KRS 218A.1422, and KRS 218A.1423.

Senator Perry B. Clark pre-filed this Bill in December of 2015.  It is an all around good Bill because it is a “Freedom” Bill.  Meaning that it opened up Medical Cannabis to patients as well as recreational Cannabis to Kentucky residents over the age of 21.  Although it is not a true REPEAL Bill that I would like to see happen, it allows a Kentucky Citizen to:

Possess up to 1 ounce of cannabis on their person;

Cultivate up to 5 cannabis plants;  (Six or more would be considered as trafficking)

Store excess cannabis lawfully grown for personal use at the location where it was cultivated; or

Transfer up to 1 ounce of cannabis to another person age 21 or older without remuneration

Possession exemption for persons under 21 if recommended by a licensed physician.

It allows for access to retail cannabis facilities, creating the ABCC (Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control) to create licenses to operate the following cannabis-related entities:

Cannabis cultivation facility; Cannabis processing facility; Cannabis testing facility; or Retail cannabis facility.

It also provides for an Excise tax imposed on licensees operating cannabis cultivation facilities selling or transferring cannabis to either a cannabis processing facility or a retail cannabis facility.

So in ONE BILL the Patients, the Recreational users, personal growers, those who would like to grow for dispensaries or medical patients, those who wish to operate legal dispensaries for patients and for recreational users and an EXCISE TAX for the State of Kentucky were taken care of legitimately!  This IS THE BILL that has my full APPROVAL!  Thank You, Sen. Perry Clark!

With as many phone calls, letters, emails and personal visits from the people of Kentucky who wish to see this Bill passed has had, there should be no reason for it NOT TO BE considered, and PASSED!

But as usual, the Kentucky money hungry Politicians are planning on this ‘patient care’ ultimately to be handed over to the pharmaceutical companies, which is why they are going to try to seriously limit the growing operation and usage of “medical marijuana” thru HB 584, so as to be able to withdraw those growers rights as soon as a pharmaceutical can take it over.  Much like they tried to do (and succeeded for a while) in Canada.

*Federal judge to decide if medical marijuana patients can grow their own

*The Liberal government will have to do substantial work on the international stage before it can follow through on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promise to legalize marijuana, new documents suggest

 

HR 173(BR-1583)

Thursday, February 25, 2016 – introduced in House

This is a Kentucky RESOLUTION to encourage the United States Food and Drug Administration to study the use of medical marijuana.

The Sponsors are David Osborne, Lynn Bechler, and Brad Montell.

As if we really need more studies before we use Cannabis….Well, here are a few that the FDA can start copying!  SEE THIS LINK!

 

AND FOR GOOD MEASURE YOU CAN ADD THIS TO THE LIST TOO: 

SB 136(BR-1420)/LM/CI    Define “kratom” and add kratom to schedule I.

Thursday, January 28, 2016 – introduced in Senate

Related post:  OPPOSE SB 136: BANNING THE KRATOM HERB

 

OTHER RELATED POSTS:

Jan 28, 2016 

Legislation to legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana is unlikely to be addressed during this legislative session in Kentucky

 

Jan 26, 2018

Former Congressman Mike Ward pushing for medical marijuana in Kentucky

 

Jan 5, 2016

Ex-congressman’s group wants medical marijuana in Kentucky

 

Dec 13, 2015

Kentucky “Cannabis Freedom Act” Summary

 

Feb 29, 2016

A KENTUCKY RESOLUTION to encourage the United States Food and Drug Administration to study the use of medical marijuana

 

Nov 1, 2015

Willie Nelson’s crusade to STOP BIG POT!

 

OTHER:

 

Kentucky Revised Statutes  Includes enactments through the 2015 Regular Session (search “marijuana”)

 

Image result for marijuana plant

 

Additionally, as a patient and recreational user,

I am a FIRM BELIEVER in a “misdemeanors”

worth!

From Organizing America to Operation Chronic Problem, How Cannabis Prohibition Ruins Lives

 

 

My Bust

 

Katree Darriel Saunders is a 30 year old mother, cannabis activist, and an active member of her community. Katree was living in Las Vegas, NV when she was arrested during a DEA sting called Operation Chronic Problem on the charges of: Conspiracy to distribute marijuana and hashish. For 10 grams of hashish and 3.5 grams of marijuana Katree has had her life as she knew it ended. This dedicated mother lost her family and job for trying to help. Trying to help what turned out to be a lying, conniving, scheming, weasel of a DEA Agent posing as a medical cannabis patient desperate for relief. This is Katree Darriel Saunders story. Her loss, her pain, and what many consider a major injustice as well as a violation of her constitutional rights.

Katree has been addicted off and on to prescription pain pills since the age of 15. In 2007, seeking pain relief from multiple car accidents, Katree Saunders became a medical cannabis patient. Knowing the harmful side effects of pharmaceuticals, plus their lack of effectiveness, Saunders chose medical cannabis. Not only did cannabis end Saunders pain, she was able to stop using prescription drugs all together. As a hardworking mother, Saunders put herself through college and became a positive and active member of her community.

Nevada’s laws prohibited the sale of cannabis in 2007, which forced Saunders to seek it through the black market, known for unsavory individuals who traffic anything from people to weapons to stolen merchandise. Once when Saunders sought cannabis from the black market she was sexually assaulted. This devastating incident convinced Saunders she had to do something. There had to be a way for her to legally and safely obtain her medication.

She contacted the state of Nevada and spoke with Jennifer Barlett, who referred her to Michael McAuliffe of Nevada’s Compassionate Care (NCC). It was there Saunders found her place. She began working with NCC and was helping others away from the black market.

Things were going well for Saunders in February of 2010. She volunteered for a political event called Organizing America where President Barack Obama spoke about healthcare reform. Saunders was chosen to be on stage. She sat in the front row behind the president as he gave his speech. Upon the close, Katree was able to shake hands with the President. While doing so, Saunders said ‘We needed to talk about medical patient’s rights.’ Then, according to Saunders, Obama looked at her and said ‘I’m not prosecuting.’

image (4)

 

Feeling confident and empowered after this Saunders then became active in helping patients obtain their medical cannabis cards from the Nevada state program. Unfortunately, while Saunders was working for NCC, she was set up by undercover DEA agents. They were conducting what was known as Operation Chronic Problem. A federal DEA agent posed as a sick patient asking for help obtaining medical cannabis.

Saunders, being a compassionate person, facilitated this lying individual’s request. Later she was indicted on distribution of a controlled substance. Saunders served four months in prison as well as a lengthy probation since she did not offer up the names of her medical patients.

While on pretrial Saunders was in another motor vehicle accident. This accident totaled her husband’s vehicle and left Saunders with a fractured foot as well as a back injury. She was placed on morphine, Xanax, and MARINOL®. The morphine began to make her heart hurt, so she opted to stop taking it in exchange for MARINOL®. MARINOL® is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring compound known as delta-9-THC. However, since Saunders was on probation, the state of Nevada told her that she could not take MARINOL® since they would not be able to determine if she was consuming cannabis or simply taking the medication.

The State of Nevada Probation Department obtained a court order preventing Saunder’s doctor from prescribing MARINOL® to her. Now, not only was Saunders in trouble for selling 3.5 grams of cannabis and 10 grams of hash, she also lost her job, family and right to medicate.

During her incarceration, her husband divorced her, took the kids and moved away. While in custody at the prison, Saunders says she was ‘sexually assaulted and harassed by US Marshals’.

During Saunders’ trial, her attorneys advised her not to mention anything about her encounter with President Obama. For the 4 months Katree Saunders was incarcerated, the state split her time between a private prison corporation (Corrections Corporation of America – CCA) and a state prison, and earned a minimum of $5,000 for hosting her. The state of Nevada spent an estimated $20,656 per inmate in 2012, and reported 267.9 million in costs. They also claimed to have 15 million dollars in prison related costs outside of the state budget. This is where states and private prison corporations make big dollars housing criminals. In the case of cannabis consumers, these corporations make out like bandits.

 

Imagine charging $21,000 a year to house someone who was busted selling or possessing cannabis. In Saunders case, that 13.5 grams of cannabis, with a street value of $150, cost taxpayers over $20,000 to put her through the system. That doesn’t include the cost of the actual arrest, which stands at $1,500 to $3,500 with booking, paperwork, police officers fees, donuts, etc.

Saunders fought hard to break away from prescription drugs, but in the end they were her only option. Purdue Pharma, the makers of OxyContin, has been making billions off victims. Purdue Pharma is involved in countless lawsuits and their officials have admitted to deceitful and immoral medical practices, yet they are still making money. These are the ones that presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speaks out about when he refers to the top one-tenth of 1%.

In 1993 the DEA allowed pharmaceutical companies to produce 3520 kilos of a drug known as oxycodone. Twenty-two years later they are manufacturing 137.5 thousand kilos of the same drug. That is an increase of 39 times in the manufacturing of this controlled substance. Since President Nixon founded the DEA in 1973, they have done nothing but prosecute those who attempt to possess, grow, or in any way affiliate themselves with cannabis.

Medical cannabis helps millions of people across the United States and world to find relief from pain and suffering. Cannabis helped Saunders break her addiction and take back control of her life. Cannabis is a safe treatment alternative for many illnesses, as well as the management of symptoms associated with a broad array of medical complications. Prescription drug addiction, of course, is a problem that is not only plaguing the United States, but the whole world.

Saunders’ battle with a prescription drug addiction from a young age illustrates the carelessness of the medical industry in allowing doctors to over-prescribe dangerous medications. It has also enabled them to receive substantial kickbacks from pharmaceutical companies in the process.

According to ABC News, America consumes over 90% of the world’s hydrocodone and 80 percent of the planet’s opioids. The United States of America makes up only 4.6 percent of the planet’s population. This opioid problem has destroyed mothers, fathers, brothers, and sisters. Children and soldiers suffer horrendously because of our country’s support for the pharmaceutical industry. Children suffer by being denied medication that could in fact actually help them, and at times even cure them. Children also suffer by losing parents who are consumed by prescription drug addiction. Soldiers who protect our freedom, often with their own lives, suffer from illnesses such as PTSD. They are sometimes denied a natural treatment, such as cannabis, to help with their symptoms.

The Doctors Enforcement Agency

The DEA licenses more than 600,000 surgeons, doctors, and podiatrists to administer prescriptions for narcotic pain relievers. According to NORML (National Reform of Marijuana Laws), in 2011 there were an estimated 1.5 million registered medical cannabis patients living in the United States of America. The sad side of this is that the laws pertaining to medical cannabis forced so many to seek their medication on the black market.

The public seems to believe that we think cannabis is the new cure-all, and other medications should be eliminated. This is not true. Common sense will tell you that there are many medical advancements today which have led us to the most sophisticated and advanced techniques and cures. During this evolution we have managed to de-evolve at the same time, through the abuse of prescription drugs, as much the fault of patients as it is the doctors doing the prescribing. Some individuals get prescription pain pills in large quantities because the doctors will prescribe them. Some individuals do not even take their medication. Instead they sell them on the street. When doctors prescribe as much as 100 to 300 pills at a time, with an average price of $10 a pill, some people can make an extra $3,000 a month.

Prohibition Has Failed and it’s Hurting America

The prohibition of cannabis that began in the late 1930s has devastated countless numbers of American lives and destroyed families across the country. The FDA will approve OxyContin for 6-year-olds but will not support cannabis oil. This is an absurd violation of human rights. The United States of America has held the patent for medical cannabis since 2003. This means that they knowingly have information that solidifies and validates medical cannabis as an effective treatment. This also means that the DEA and FDA know, and have evidence, that cannabis is medicine.

For the past 12 years the DEA has left cannabis as a schedule 1 narcotic. This puts it in the same class as heroin and cocaine, that it has no medicinal value. They have lied to the American people kept the public sick, and now some laugh at us while the cannabis community is trying to change laws to better the world around us.

The Dogs of the Feds

The DEA regularly raids medicinal cannabis facilities and Indian tribal lands. They arrest, abuse, neglect and destroy the lives of countless cannabis consumers. Medical patients and recreational consumers alike suffer the wrath of the DEA everyday. There are no public benefits from cannabis prohibition! The medicinal aspects combined with potential taxes are unquestionably positive. The simple implementation of taxation on cannabis will help to eliminate the black market. This puts a lot of politicians, local sheriffs, and other individuals out of extra income they have enjoyed for years.

Katree Saunders felt the wrath of the DEA during Operation Chronic Pain and now you know her story. From being hooked on prescription drugs at 15, to meeting the President of the United States, to prison, to an avid cannabis activist, Saunders’ struggle is all too familiar to many Americans, except for meeting Mr. Barack Obama.

Help support America by being a seed. One seed can tip the scales of injustice. Are you that seed?

The stock markets will soon welcome a dispensary to the ranks of the publicly traded

January 13, 2016

Oakland Dispensary Shares To Be Publicly Traded

Following a brutal 2015 for marijuana stocks, the cannabis investment sector has something to smile about to start the new year. The stock markets will soon welcome a dispensary to the ranks of the publicly traded: Black Oak Gallery, better known as Blüm Oakland.

Blüm joins dispensary Kaya Shack in Portland, Oregon, a subsidiary division of a publicly-traded company, Kaya Holdings (KAYS). Kaya Shack opened in 2014.

But Blüm Oakland didn’t take the traditional route of selling shares to raise capital. Rather, the Oakland dispensary has announced it will merge with an already public company, Terra Tech Corp. (TRTC), an agricultural and cannabis cultivation company in Newport Beach, California, with a market cap of nearly $30 million.

“It’s very significant,” said Matt Karnes, president of GreenWave Advisors, a New York City-based cannabis consulting firm. “The fact that you have a dispensary that has to file financial disclosures and be transparent, that definitely helps the legitimacy of the industry.”

Karnes does not expect the SEC to oppose the deal, because Terra Tech has already stated in its filings that it plans to grow and sell marijuana. “They didn’t come back and ding it,” Karnes said. “I don’t expect them to block it.”

The emergence of publicly traded marijuana-touching businesses should also help reduce the leeriness that many institutional investors feel for the cannabis sector by providing them with companies that they can scrutinize.

“When a company has to file financial statements, it eliminates uncertainty,” said Karnes. “It could provide investors with a benchmark. They’ll have a company that they can compare to other marijuana companies that may go public.”

While Blüm’s soon-to-be publicly traded status is a major advance for the cannabis industry, the merger would also be a major milestone for Blüm’s owner Salwa Ibrahim, who hopes it will help the dispensary fulfill ambitions of expanding into other markets.

Ibrahim said Blüm and Terra Tech have already worked together to secure permits in Nevada for a venture known as MediFarm, which has several cultivation, processing, and dispensary sites in the state.

“It is our hope that we can continue to secure permits and to develop sustainable but successful operations in new markets opening up,” Ibrahim said in a statement. “We’re looking forward to bringing together the core teams of both companies and finding other capable operators in this growing industry to join with as we continue to further our business strategy.”

Under the agreement, Terra Tech will acquire 100% of Blüm’s outstanding shares plus its integrated supply chain, which consists of an onsite cultivation facility, proprietary strains, and retail storefront, the companies said in a statement. The deal is expected to close by March 31.

Blüm opened in November 2012 and had close to $15 million in revenue in 2015. The company sees almost 1,000 patients daily, and has about 42,000 registered patients in all.

Terra Tech bought Blüm for about 1.5-times forward-looking revenue – estimated to be about $14 million – for the 12 months after the merger closes, or about $21 million. To protect stockholders, 80% of the equity will be held in escrow subject to performance adjustments at the end of the 12-month term.

Terra Tech’s shares were up to 11 cents from nine cents on the news. The company had a 52-week high of 28 cents and a low of 8 cents.

Terra Tech CEO Derek Peterson said the merger gives his company more cash-flow and positions it to take advantage of the regulatory changes that will come with the implementation of California’s Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act in 2016 this March.

The states new regulations will for the first time allow for-profit marijuana businesses. Some of Terra Tech’s competitors are not likely to successfully navigate the licensing process, while they will increase the number of potential legal-market customers in the state. Also under the new regulations, vertically-integrated cannabis businesses which growing, extract, process and sell product will not be allowed – that is, unless that company was formed before July 1, 2015.

Terra Tech Corp also owns IVXX LLC, which produces medical cannabis-extracted products for regulated medical cannabis dispensaries throughout California, and Edible Garden, whose produce is sold in major grocery stores such as Shoprite, Walmart, and Krogers.

“As we continue to develop our long-term strategy in Nevada, it has always been our goal to also focus on near-term acquisitions that have immediate value to our stockholders,” explained Mike Nahass, Director of Terra Tech.

CONTINUE READING…

Another push for medical pot in Indiana not likely to work

Odds against Indiana legislators backing medical marijuana

Posted: Sunday, January 3, 2016 5:00 am | Updated: 5:14 pm, Sun Jan 3, 2016.

By Jeff Parrott South Bend Tribune

Posted on Jan 3, 2016

The husband and father was near death from Crohn’s Disease in 2009….

Over a three-month period, his weight dropped from about 175 pounds to 117 pounds. He had his large intestine, colon and rectum removed, and he was largely confined to his bed or a chair.

He had no appetite and was surviving largely on IV fluid. He was so worried about accidentally jarring the stapled incision in his abdomen that his muscles ached from the constant tension.

Marijuana had just been legalized for medical use that year. At his wife’s suggestion, he tried smoking some, first illegally because he wanted to see whether it helped him before he went through the process of applying for a legal permit.

“It was amazing,” recalled the man, who lives in Michigan, just a few miles from the Indiana line. “Instantaneous. I could feel my shoulders drop and my body relax. In less than 10 minutes, I was feeling the urge in my stomach to eat. I started feeling better. I ate more. Started gaining more weight.”

It’s stories like his that have prompted two Democratic lawmakers, Sen. Karen Tallian of Ogden Dunes and Rep. Sue Errington of Muncie, to sponsor medical marijuana bills in the Indiana General Assembly session that starts Monday. Indiana would join 23 other states in legalizing marijuana and become part of a national debate over the medical merits.

The odds of success for the legislators, however, are not great. Bills they introduced in the 2015 session died in committee for lack of a hearing. With Republicans in firm control of both houses, Tallian isn’t overly optimistic 2016 will be any different.

Sen. Joe Zakas, R-Granger, echoes the sentiments of many in his party. He stops short of disputing that marijuana can provide relief for some medical problems, but he thinks that would be overshadowed by a corresponding increase in recreational use and abuse.

"I would listen to the arguments as to its medical use," Zakas said. "I just haven’t heard a convincing argument on that yet. I want to hear the evidence from solid sources that it’s a viable medical tool."

Tallian, a criminal defense attorney who thinks it’s wasteful to jail people for smoking pot when recreational use is now legal in four states, had for the past three years introduced bills to decriminalize recreational marijuana use. It would still be illegal but possessing small amounts would be treated as an infraction, similar to a traffic ticket. Her bills have never received a hearing.

In 2015, Tallian changed tack, authoring a bill to legalize medical marijuana by creating an Indiana Department of Marijuana Enforcement that would regulate it much like pharmaceuticals, in a pilot program for people suffering a specific list of ailments.

Her bill also would have allowed Indiana universities and pharmaceutical companies to conduct research on medicinal use. Errington introduced a companion measure in the House.

In the coming session, Tallian and Errington said they’ll introduce bills for both decriminalization and medical use. Tallian said she would be willing to drop the decriminalization component if it meant finally getting a hearing for medical use.

“We move by inches down there, so I’d take every inch I could get,” she said. “I have a lot of votes over there on the Republican side if I could just get a hearing.”

Last session, her bill was assigned to the Health and Provider Services Committee, where chair Patricia Miller, R-Indianapolis, declined to give it a hearing. Miller was unavailable for comment.

“Pat Miller kept saying, ‘We don’t have enough proof yet” that marijuana offers medicinal benefits, Tallian said. “That’s because we haven’t had the opportunity to do research.”

Her bill has yet to be assigned a committee for the 2016 session.

‘A buzz or a high’

Asked to identify a supportive Republican, Tallian mentioned Sen. Jim Tomes of Poseyville, a small, rural town outside Evansville. Tomes this year introduced a bill to legalize the growing of hemp, a form of marijuana that lacks THC, the drug that gives marijuana smokers a high.

In addition to a variety of industrial textile uses, hemp can produce cannabis oil, which has a well-documented record of alleviating seizures in children with epilepsy.

Tomes said parents of children with epilepsy have increasingly turned to him for their cause.

“This is extremely different than what Sen. Tallian is trying to do,” said Tomes, who doesn’t support legalizing medical marijuana.

“I understand there are certain applications and I’m not taking that away from anyone,” he added. “But it also has the ability to give people a buzz or a high. That’s a factor I just cannot support.”

The concept has found more traction in other states. Illinois recently launched a Medical Cannabis Pilot Program, allowing 13 licensed dispensaries to open around the state. Sales began in November to about 3,900 licensed patients.

Kentucky last year became one of 18 states that allows use or research of cannabis oil for seizure treatment.

Ohio voters last month overwhelming rejected a ballot initiative to legalize recreational use, but observers have attributed that more to the fact that the right to produce and distribute marijuana would have been concentrated in the hands of a few wealthy producers.

In the coming year, recreational marijuana may be on the ballot in 11 states, including Michigan, according to Ballotpedia, a website that tracks ballots issues nationwide. Another five states might consider medical pot initiatives.

Sen. John Broden, D-South Bend, said he isn’t ready to commit to supporting medical marijuana, but he hopes it will at least receive a committee hearing in the coming session.

“For me, it’s very important that it be very narrowly tailored so it does address medical issues, it’s administered by the health care community or by a doctor,” Broden said. “I’m certainly open to hearing about it.”

Conducting committee hearings would allow testimony from officials in other states that have legalized medical marijuana, such as law enforcement officials in Michigan.

“If these other states have had positive experiences or at least not had negative experiences … that would be critical for me,” he said.

When asked whether she knew of any doctors who wish they could legally prescribe marijuana, Errington pointed to Dr. Bruce Ippel, a 66-year-old family practice physician near Muncie. Over his 40 years as a doctor, Ippel said, many of his patients have reported using marijuana for relief from ailments such as headaches and migraines, as well as appetite stimulation for people with cancer and chronic intestinal illness from diabetes.

He isn’t sure if medical marijuana will become legal in Indiana in his lifetime. But while admitting he’s cynical, Ippel thinks Indiana lawmakers eventually will legalize marijuana so that they can tax it and grow state revenue. Colorado collected almost $70 million in marijuana taxes last fiscal year, nearly double the $42 million collected from alcohol taxes, according to Time magazine.

Ippel noted that even in Indiana, society has grown more tolerant of pot.

"The landscape has changed," he said. "Twenty years ago, anyone using marijuana was at high risk of being locked up. Indiana law enforcement agencies have largely backed off common users. I think that’s a change in the last six to eight years that’s been a benefit."

CONTINUE READING…

2015: The Year In Review – NORML’s Top 10 Events That Shaped Marijuana Policy

Tuesday, 29 December 2015

2015: The Year In Review - NORML's Top 10 Events That Shaped Marijuana Policy

#1 Congress Reauthorizes Medical Marijuana Protections
Members of Congress approved language in the fiscal year 2016 omnibus spending bill that continues to limit the federal government from taking punitive action against state-licensed individuals or operations that are acting are in full compliance with the medical marijuana laws of their states. The provisions reauthorize Section 538 of the Continuing Appropriations Act of 2015, which states, "None of the funds made available in this act to the Department of Justice may be used … to prevent … states … from implementing their own state laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana." Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/12/17/congress-omnibus-spending-bill-reauthorizes-medical-marijuana-protections.

#2 Federal Judge Upholds Marijuana’s Schedule I Status
A federal judge in April rejected a motion challenging the constitutionality of cannabis’ classification as a Schedule I prohibited substance. "At some point in time, a court may decide this status to be unconstitutional," Judge Kimberly Mueller said from the bench. "But this is not the court and not the time." Judge Meuller had presided over five days of hearings in October 2014 in a challenge brought by members of the NORML Legal Committee. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/04/16/federal-judge-upholds-marijuana-s-schedule-i-status.

#3 Medical Cannabis Access Associated With Less Opioid Abuse
States that permit qualified patients to access medical marijuana via dispensaries possess lower rates of opioid addiction and overdose deaths, according to a study published in July by the National Bureau of Economic Research, a non-partisan think-tank. The findings mirror those published in 2014 in The Journal of the American Medical Association concluding, "States with medical cannabis laws had a 24.8 percent lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rate compared with states without medical cannabis laws." Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/07/16/study-medical-cannabis-access-associated-with-reduced-opioid-abuse.

#4 DC Depenalizes Marijuana; Arrests Plummet
Despite threats from members of Congress, District officials implemented voter-approved legislation earlier this year eliminating penalties associated with the possession and cultivation of personal use quantities of marijuana by adults. Following the law’s implementation, marijuana-related arrests in the nation’s capital fell 99 percent. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/12/04/cities-see-major-decline-in-marijuana-possession-arrests.

#5 Marijuana Law Changes Don’t Change Youth Use, Attitudes
Rates of youth marijuana use are unaffected by changing laws, according to data published in July in The American Journal of drug and Alcohol Abuse. Investigators evaluated trends in young people’s attitudes toward cannabis and their use of the substance during the years 2002 to 2013 – a time period where 14 states enacted laws legalizing the medical use of the plant, and two states approved its recreational use by adults. "Our results may suggest that recent changes in public policy, including the decriminalization, medicalization, and legalization of marijuana in cities and states across the country, have not resulted in more use or greater approval of marijuana use among younger adolescents," researchers reported. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/07/16/study-changes-in-state-marijuana-laws-are-not-associated-with-greater-use-or-acceptance-by-young-people.

#6 Gallup Poll: More Americans Than Ever Say Marijuana Should Be Legal
Fifty-eight percent of Americans believe that "the use of marijuana should be made legal," according to nationwide survey data released in October by Gallup pollsters. The percentage ties the highest level of support ever reported by Gallup, which has been measuring Americans’ attitudes toward cannabis since the late 1960s. The percentage is more than twice the level of support reported in the mid-1990s. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/10/22/gallup-support-for-legalizing-marijuana-at-historic-high-2.

#7 Study: Marijuana Use Not Associated With Changes In Brain Morphology
Marijuana use is not associated with structural changes in the brain, according to imaging data published in January in The Journal of Neuroscience. Investigators assessed brain morphology in both daily adult and adolescent cannabis users compared to non-users. They found "no statistically significant differences … between daily users and nonusers on volume or shape in the regions of interest" after researchers controlled for participants’ use of alcohol. "[T]he results indicate that, when carefully controlling for alcohol use, gender, age, and other variables, there is no association between marijuana use and standard volumetric or shape measurements of subcortical structures," researchers reported. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/02/19/study-marijuana-use-not-associated-with-previously-reported-changes-in-brain-morphology.

#8 Marijuana Consumers Less Likely To Be Obese, Suffer Diabetes Risk
Those who consume cannabis are 50 percent less likely to suffer from metabolic syndrome as compared to those who do not, according to findings published in November in The American Journal of Medicine. Metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat, which are linked to increased risk of heart disease and adult onset diabetes, among other serious health consequences. The findings are similar to those of previous studies reporting that those who use cannabis are less likely to be obese or suffer from diabetes. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/11/19/study-marijuana-consumers-less-likely-to-suffer-from-metabolic-syndrome.

#9 NHTSA: THC-Positive Drivers Don’t Possesses Elevated Crash Risk
Drivers who test positive for the presence of THC in their blood are no more likely to be involved in motor vehicle crashes than are drug-free drivers, according to a case-control study released in February by the United States National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration. Authors reported that drivers who tested positive for the presence of THC possessed an unadjusted, elevated risk of accident of 25 percent (Odds Ratio=1.25) compared to controls (drivers who tested negative for any drug or alcohol). However, this elevated risk became insignificant (OR=1.05) after investigators adjusted for demographic variables, such as the drivers’ age and gender. The study is the largest of its kind ever conducted in the United States. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/02/12/feds-thc-positive-drivers-no-more-likely-to-be-involved-in-motor-vehicle-crashes.

#10 Legal Marijuana States Collect Over $200 Million In New Tax Revenue
Taxes on the legal production and sale of cannabis in the states of Colorado and Washington have yielded over $200 million in new revenue since going into effect in 2014, according to calculations reported by The Huffington Post in September. Colorado collected more than $117 million dollars from marijuana sales while Washington collected over $83 million. Cannabis sales commenced in Oregon in on October 1, 2015 and have yet to begin in Alaska. Read the full story at: http://norml.org/news/2015/09/03/legal-marijuana-states-collect-over-200-million-in-new-tax-revenue.

CONTINUE READING…

Kentucky "Cannabis Freedom Act" Summary

legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Coalition·Saturday, December 12, 2015

Cannabis Freedom Act Summary

Section 1

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Definitions

Section 2

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Personal possession, use, and cultivation limits

Persons 21 years and older may:

Possess up to 1 ounce of cannabis on their person;

Cultivate up to 5 cannabis plants;

Store excess cannabis lawfully grown for personal use at the location where it was cultivated; or

Transfer up to 1 ounce of cannabis to another person age 21 or older without remuneration

Possession exemption for persons under 21 if recommended by a licensed physician

Section 3

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibition on smoking cannabis in public

Maximum penalty: $100 fine

Section 4

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibitions on access to retail cannabis facilities,

Persons under 21 years of age shall not:

o Enter retail cannabis facilities to purchase cannabis or cannabis products;

o Possess, purchase, or attempt to possess or purchase cannabis or cannabis products;

o Misrepresent their age or use false identification to induce an illegal sale of cannabis or cannabis products; or

o Remain on any premises that sells cannabis or cannabis products

Licensees, their agents, or employees are prohibited from permitting persons under 21 years of age from remaining on any premises where cannabis and cannabis products are sold.

o Maximum penalty: Class B misdemeanor

Section 5

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibition on unlawful possession of cannabis

Maximum penalty: $250 fine

Section 6

(New Section KRS Chapter 245)

Personal cultivation requirements

Person who chooses to cultivate for personal consumption must take reasonable precautions to ensure that any cannabis or cannabis plants are secure from unauthorized access and access by persons under twenty-one years of age.

Persons shall only cultivate cannabis for personal consumption on property that they own or with the consent of the person in lawful possession of the property.

o Maximum penalty: $500 fine

Section 7

(New Section KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibition on unlawful cultivation of cannabis (ULCC) with the intent to sell or transfer it for valuable consideration ULCC of 11 or more cannabis plants

o Maximum penalty: Class D felony

ULCC of 6-10 cannabis plants

o Maximum penalty: Class A misdemeanor

ULCC of 5 or fewer cannabis plants

o Maximum penalty: Class B misdemeanor

ULCC of six or more cannabis plants creates a presumption that unlawful cultivation was for sale or transfer

Section 8

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control (ABCC) to promulgate administrative regulations to implement various aspects of Act within 180 days of the Act becoming law.

Section 9

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

ABCC to create licenses to operate the following cannabis-related entities:

Cannabis cultivation facility;

Cannabis processing facility;

Cannabis testing facility; or

Retail cannabis facility.

Licenses created pursuant to this section shall cost $5,000 and be valid for 12 months from the date of issuance

Section 10

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Licensure requirements

Applicant must pay nonrefundable $100 application fee which will be applied to their licensing fee if a license is issued to the applicant

ABCC shall:

Create uniform license application form;

Issue a license to an applicant unless:

o The applicant has been convicted of crime which would qualify them as a violent offender;

o The applicant falsifies information on the application for a license; or

o The applicant has had a previous license issued by ABCC revoked within the 12 months prior to the reapplication.

Section 11

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Excise tax imposed on licensees operating cannabis cultivation facilities selling or transferring cannabis to either a cannabis processing facility or a retail cannabis facility.

Effective January 1, 2017:

$30 per ounce on all cannabis flowers

$10 per ounce on all parts of the cannabis plant other than the flowers

$10 per immature cannabis plant

Reporting requirements

Department of Revenue may prescribe forms and promulgate administrative regulations to collect taxes created under this section

Section 12

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Creates a revolving trust and agency account from licensure, renewal, and administrative fees Account to be used for the enforcement of the Act by ABCC

Section 13

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

The Kentucky Responsible Cannabis Use Program (KRCUP) fund is created as a restricted fund

The KRCUP fund is comprised off all the excise tax revenue collected under Section 11 of the Act and all the sales and use tax revenue collected on cannabis and cannabis products.

The proceeds contained in the fund are to be distributed according to the following formula:

30% of funds to go the public school fund to support education excellence in Kentucky (SEEK);

20% of funds to go to the Kentucky Department of Education for scholarships based on socioeconomic need for students to attend public institutions of postsecondary education in Kentucky;

20% of funds to go to the Office of Drug Control Policy to dispense grants to substance abuse treatment programs that employ evidence-based behavioral health treatments or medically assisted treatment;

15% of funds to go to the Kentucky Law Enforcement Council to dispense grants to county and local law enforcement agencies to buy protective equipment, communications equipment, and training; and

15% shall be deposited into the general fund.

Section 14

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

$500 Civil penalty for each violation of KRS Chapter 245

$1000 Civil penalty for failing to maintain written tax records and reports required by the Department of Revenue

Section 15

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Corporate and individual liability for violations of KRS Chapter 245

Section 16

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Cannabis or cannabis products which are held, owned, or possessed by any person other than those authorized by KRS Chapter 245 is declared contraband.

The ABCC can dispose of contraband cannabis and cannabis products using the same procedures and protocols that they currently use for contraband alcoholic beverages.

Section 17

(New Section of KRS Chapter 100)

Prevents local political subdivisions with zoning power from:

Using their zoning power to institute a moratorium on cannabis-related entities;

Using their zoning power to discriminate against cannabis-related entities by treating them differently from other similar entities;

Using their zoning power to impose more stringent security requirements than those required by ABCC; or Imposing additional fees in excess of what other applicants seeking to operate a business are charged.

Section 18

(New Section of KRS Chapter 65)

Prevents county and local governments from instituting de facto or de jure moratoriums on cannabis related entities.

Section 19

(New Section of KRS Chapter 311)

Allows any licensed physicians acting in good faith to recommend cannabis or cannabis products to their patients.

Physicians who recommend cannabis or cannabis products to patients under the age of 18 must obtain parental consent and a second recommendation from another licensed physician.

Provides civil, criminal, and licensing immunity to physicians who, in good faith, recommend cannabis or cannabis products.

Section 20

(Amends KRS 12.020)

Renames the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control

Establishes the Division of Cannabis

Section 21

(Amends KRS 241.010)

Amends definition of “board” and “department” to reflect the addition of cannabis

Section 22

(Amends KRS 241.015)

Renames the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control

Section 23

(Amends KRS 241.020)

Empowers the Department of Alcoholic Beverages and Cannabis Control to regulate traffic in cannabis and cannabis products.

Creates the Division of Cannabis to administer the laws in relation cultivation, processing, testing, and sale of cannabis and cannabis products.

Section 24

(Amends KRS 241.030)

Adds one appointed position to the Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control Board to act as director of the Division of Cannabis.

Section 25

(Amends KRS 2.015)

Amends the age of majority statute in regards to cannabis.

Section 26

(Amends KRS 218A.010)

Removes the definition of marijuana from Kentucky’s Controlled Substances Act.

Section 27

(Amends KRS 218A.050)

Removes marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinols, and hashish from the list of Schedule I controlled substances.

Section 28

(Amends KRS 218A.510)

Removes references to marijuana and hashish from the definition of drug paraphernalia.

Section 29

(Amends KRS 260.850)

Removes industrial hemp from the definition of cannabis.

Section 30

(Amends KRS 600.020)

Includes cannabis offenses in the definition of status offense action under Kentucky’s Juvenile Code.

Section 31

(Amends KRS 610.010)

Grants jurisdiction of juvenile cases involving cannabis to either the juvenile session of District Court or the family division of the Circuit Court.

Section 32

(Amends 630.020)

Adds cannabis offenses to list of status offenses which have to be adjudicated in juvenile court.

Section 33

(Amends KRS 218A.276)

Removes obsolete reference to marijuana statutes that would be repealed if this Act becomes law.

Section 34

(Amends KRS 630.120)

Prevents juveniles who are adjudicated guilty of cannabis offenses from being committed to the Department of Juvenile Justice for detention (mirrors alcohol and tobacco offenses).

Section 35

(Amends KRS 131.650)

Removes obsolete reference to a taxing statute which would be repealed if this Act becomes law.

Section 36

(Repeals KRS 138.870, 138.872, 138.874, 138.876, 138.878, 138.880, 138.882,138.884, 138.885, 138.886, 138.888, 138.889, 218A.1421, 218A.1422, 218A.1423)

Section 37

(Short Title: Cannabis Freedom Act)

INFORMATION SOURCE LINK

UPDATED LINK TO THE KENTUCKY LEGISLATURE WILL BE POSTED WHEN AVAILABLE!

KY Senator files "Cannabis Freedom Act" rolling medicinal and recreational use together in one hit

By Brad Bowman, Published: December 12, 2015 3:56PM

Clark talking about cannabis in a legislative committee meeting. Photo courtesy of the Legislative Research Commission.

Democrat Sen. Perry Clark of Louisville has advocated for the legalization of medical marijuana since the last legislative session to this summer at Mensa’s Annual Gathering where he cleared the smoke and myths surrounding marijuana. Friday he filed a bill rolling medical and recreational use in one big hit.

Clark filed the “Cannabis Freedom Act” which would regulate the use of cannabis just as the state regulates alcohol.

Touting the benefit of pot over pills and curbing opioid addiction for patients who use marijuana to overcome pain and problems from illness like multiple sclerosis, Clark has talked extensively in the Senate and legislative committees about the benefits and regulation of marijuana.

After the Mensa event this summer, Clark had told The State Journal he wanted to have a meaningful conversation about the senseless prohibition of the plant, which Clark said, has been financially backed by alcohol and tobacco companies blocking the legislation in other states.

The “Cannabis Freedom Act” would end the prohibition on marijuana cultivation, possession and selling the substance in regulatory framework similar to Colorado.

Quick takeaways on the act include: it would only be available to residents 21 and over;

• residents could possess up to 1 ounce on their person;

•cultivate up to 5 plants;

• store an excess of cultivated cannabis for personal use where it was cultivated or transfer 1 ounce to another person 21 or older without remuneration.

• persons under 21 could possess cannabis if it was recommended by a licensed physician;

• no smoking cannabis in public places

Other parts of the regulator framework would include only residents 21 and over could enter a retail facility for the purchase of cannabis or related products.

Clark’s bill would maximize unlawful possession at $250 and a $500 fine for illegal growing marijuana on a property without the property owner’s permission.

“It is abundantly clear to me that cannabis, while being much less harmful, should be treated the same as alcohol,” Clark said in a release. “The Cannabis Freedom Act is an outline on how to tax and regulate the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and older in Kentucky. It is time for this discussion in our Commonwealth.”

The act’s regulatory framework has a three-tier licensing system which separates cannabis cultivators, processors and retailers independently to “prevent monopolization and vertical integration,” a component different from the framework proposed in Ohio.

Clark said the tax revenues would be in a restricted fund to increase SEEK funding for the state’s public schools and provide scholarships to Kentucky students who qualify for needs-based  assistance to both public and post-secondary schools in Kentucky.

Revenues would also help fund evidence-based substance abuse treatment programs, provide grants to local law enforcement agencies to purchase protective equipment and provide additional revenue to the state’s general fund.

During the 30-day short session, Clark brought up the medicinal studies and medical benefits of cannabis almost every day in the Senate.

Follow political reporter Brad Bowman at @bradleybowman for all state government and political news.

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Red Vanwinkle explains why we must regulate cannabis like alcohol in kentucky

 

December 12, 2015

Good morning everybody!

Will you help me?

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Above: Patient in Illinois tends to a plant in 2010.

Today I will be sharing a story that only a handful of people knows about. Some know just enough, that I have been asked many times over the years to share publicly. I haven’t done so, because it could be seen as a weakness. So here goes, and it’s 100% true. As some of my longtime friends know.

It all started with extreme bloating. Eventually my belly got so big, I was about a 40 waist, but was drastically loosing weight. I was getting weaker everyday.

After some time, I had a bunch of symptoms hitting me. Some scary stuff. Like pain all over in my joints. Eyes so dry in the mornings, I would open them real slow, as to not rip my eyes. I was getting weak as a kitten, and bed ridden some days.

Then I started to get mind fog. So bad so, I got lost driving in Monticello KY. Which I know the place very well, and has only about 3 stop lights. I then my eyes started to change colors. Then my skin started to change colors. I started turning yellow. I was not able to get out of bed much at this point. I knew this was something that might kill me. I seen my family cry, and very afraid of their future. Which was hard for a man to swallow.

During this time we lived off the grid. Not much money at all. I cut and sold firewood, some crops, and a little homemade drink. Certainly not enough money to have doctors and hospitals find out what was wrong. With me being too week to cut and split much wood. We had less wood to sell. So we had less money.

I had started trying to get my affairs in order. But I was not giving up. I went into town (Monticello) almost everyday. I went to the library to do research online. Which is how I was getting lost, being by myself. But it wasn’t a major problem, just drive around for a minute, and I would be back on my road heading home.

Spelling simple 3 and 4 letter words, was becoming a major issue in my research. But I swallowed my pride, and started asking people how to spell words, when I ran into the issue. I know this sounds simple enough. But it is a hard task to ask someone how to spell "was". People think you’re mentally handicapped, completely uneducated, or on dope. Which during this time, I was not doing anything. No drinking, no pot, no over the counter pain meds, or anything I thought could place strain on my liver.

I had actually stopped smoking pot before I got sick. I stopped smoking cigarettes during that time too. And I rarely ever drink. When I do drink, I don’t drink much. I did when I was really young. But as I got older, the after effects got worse (hangover). So I quit that business long ago lol.

The mind fog continued to get worse, as I became more yellow in color. I had gotten to the point I was having a hard time remembering how to say some words. Conversation was becoming a difficult task.
There was several more symptoms. Too many to go into detail here, and that some I would rather not share. I got to where almost everything I ate caused me some type of issue. Which drove the wife nuts trying to see I was able to eat.

It got so bad, that my wife came to me crying, saying she can’t watch me die. I told her I was getting better. That it was just going to take time to show on the outside. Yes, a little white lie at the time. But I figured well placed. I soon after started being a jerk, so she would leave me. I had come to the conclusion. That if this killed me. I was going to die on my terms, and alone. As I did not want this burden on anyone else. Yet she didn’t go anywhere.

Yet, I was still not just going to give up. In my research. I knew my liver was shutting down. So I started buying different liver supporting substances. Like a vitamin called liver aid, milk thistle. I bought B12 to help increase energy. I bought acidophilus to help incase I had cancer. Which many signs was pointing at that. And I had recently had a close relative die from liver cancer. There was other various health items too, but the listed ones was my go to meds.

All this stuff was not cheap in the stores. But I knew I had to have it. I needed it to keep me going, so I could find out what was wrong with me. Luckily there was a salvage store in Pine Knot. This store on one day a week had all kinds of vitamins for cheap. They had boxes, and boxes of different vitamins, and over the counter meds. The wife and I would search through all those boxes for a bottle here and there. Most of the time, we would find enough to get me through the week. Which they had new stuff every week. So this became a weekly thing, of a couple hours. There was times we found extras, so I would buy all I could. I would even count change just to get as many of the found extras as we could. Hated to leave any bottles, as I knew I would sometime or another need them, and not have them. There was some weeks we didn’t find what I needed. So I would bum some from friends that had alcohol related liver issues. Just to make it to the next week. Good friends are worth more than gold to me!!!
So back to figuring out what was wrong. I had symptoms that matched cancer, and about 100 different rare genetic disorders. Genetic disorders are not contagious, it’s something a person is either born with or not. But could be dormant for years before coming to cause issues.

So there I was. I had either a possibility of various cancers, or a genetic disorder. Which most of these things I found was calling for a prognosis of death, with varying expected times. But there was hope. I had started eating super healthy, and taking my vitamins/meds. I was seeing improvement with my liver situation. The situation went from all bad, to sometimes improvement. While other times not. Which was also kinda scary, as this type improvements with these things, is also likely with liver cancer. But basically a little time buying. Either way, I was taking what I could get, and happy to have it. As the steady decline was even more scary. As the scariest thing was leaving my family without. This I had to fix!

With the small improvements, and the energy increase from eating lots of sublingual B12 tablets a few times a day. I was able to do more. Sublingual tablets absorb inside your mouth. So almost instant energy.

I started looking at getting back closer to her family. We logged the property, and bought a foreclosure. We got the home at a amazing price. The asking price was so low, we knew others would also be putting in offers. So I offered them $1200 more than asking price, and we got it. We was flat broke no furniture. An extension cord running from our new neighbors lol. But we had the house, and food in our belles. Which was completion of phase one. Make sure the family had enough to be ok when I left.

This new home needed all kinds of work, and still needs some. But it has awesome bones. Multi colored brick, new metal roof, a two car garage, and fenced in yard on an acre. This new home was out in the country. Yet a 15 minute drive to Elizabethtown KY. Which is very close to Fort Know KY.

The jobs was available here. I had no problem in getting jobs. Matter of fact, I got 3 as soon as I went looking. I applied for jobs I thought I could handle. Which I decided I was going to take them all. I felt like superman changing cloths on the fly lol.

One of the jobs was an advertising associate. Which I did sales, and mostly at my convenience. Which was easy enough. Just had to get some fancy duds, and a hair cut. I didn’t make a killing, but did ok.
The next job was a pizza delivery driver a few hours a day. Which again was easy enough. I just needed a gps tell me where to go. So I got one, and the job was a piece of cake. I made a sorry paycheck, but made good in tips.

The 3rd job was kind of tougher. Yet I still felt it was doable. I applied at a factory delivering parts to the different lines. Which I had a cart that I drove around. This one proved to be a bit more difficult. I had no gps to tell me where to go, and I would get turned around from time to time. Which I just applied my previous way of dealing with such. I drove until I figured out where I was lol. Most thought I was just having fun, so I played along. I would Aihooooo, and toot the horn as I would fly by hahahaha. This job was also long hours, and 7 day a week most weeks. So I was having a hard time doing so much. Yet I was making the most of my money on this job. Most, but not all my money. So I just needed something to bring in a few more bucks.

I quit the factory job, and started my handyman service. I had to act as if the client needed something major. I was not the best qualified to do the task. As really I was not able to do a lot physically, even though I had all the knowledge to compete almost any home repair. I just didn’t want to let be known, I was not physically able to do some task. I remember in the beginning. I was doing a painting job, and started to give out on a ladder. I told the home owner, the heavy onion smell, from something they was cooking was causing me issue, and I needed a break for fresh air. Which was likely true, as onions was one of the things that started making me sick if I ate them. Which the homeowner quickly aired out the home, while I was getting some fresh air. I also ate several b12 tablets. Which I was able to continue on.

As business increased, I was able to add the family. Which they worked hard, and we was as efficient as any small construction crew. I have several awesome short cuts, that makes things faster, and easier, with the same quality results (Work smarter, not harder).

You know I am not in such a condition now. So how, and when did I change things around. I was spending every spare moment researching medical conditions. We had wifi at our new place. Which made research a lot more convenient. I was doing lots of research on auto immune disorders(genetic disorder). Because I had seen in my research. Autoimmune disorders can have greatly varying symptoms. Which makes it difficult for medical professionals to track down. This also causes wrong diagnoses many times.

As I researched Autoimmune disorders. I learned that they can stay dormant in a person for many years, or never come about even if the person has the genetics to develop a Autoimmune disorder. That this can be triggered by several things. One of those things is surgery. Which just before my issues started, I had all my teeth pulled. Because I had bad teeth, due to a genetic disorder. Where I had no natural enamel coating on my teeth. So bells was going off, for me to concentrate my research here. I tested gluten, and gluten was a factor in the bely bloating, and pain. So I stopped gluten. With some results but still some things got worse. Which caused me to realize I could be affected by multiple genetic disorders.

I had been researching everything I could. Other medical practices in other places, and there findings, and treatments. Then somehow in my search I was reading some comments to a blog. One that said the US health department held a patent on cannabinoids having positive effects on Autoimmune disorders. So I copied, and pasted a search. Because at that time I didn’t know what cannabinoids was. As many people still don’t know what it is.
Sure enough, the US health department has this documented, and patented. This along with having positive effects in treating cancer. At this point, I am in shock that this is not know by the public. There has to be a reason. Because when I do searches on autoimmune, and cancer. There was thousands of different kinds of claims to be of benefit. But during that time, there was nothing unless you did a direct search for cannabinoids and cancer, or Cannabinoids and Autoimmune. I found the reason this was not very well known.

You know where cannabinoids are found? CANNABIS!!! Both hemp, and Marijuana has them.

Now I was starting to see another link. About the same time I quit consuming Cannabis, was about the same time I started getting sick. Could it be Cannabis was helping prevent autoimmune from developing? As I did my research, I found this to be very possible.

Here I was, had not consumed Cannabis for years. Didn’t really want to spend the money to get it. Takes time to grow. So I had to think long and hard. First I talked with my wife and son. I told them, and showed them what I had found. I asked them what they thought about me trying this to get better. They both looked at me like I was stupid. Not because it would be shameful. Because they didn’t care if I had to eat horse poop to get better. So with them it was a definite wanting me to give it a try.

Next I went and talked with my inlaws. As they have always been against any drugs, drinking, and even smoking. I rarely ever even smoke around them still today. Father inlaw was acting like he was ok, but I really didn’t know. Mother inlaw was acting tolerant as she knew I was sick. But was skeptical about any possible improvements.
The next input I went to seek was my friends. Which I even actually made a post. Back then, about 30 friends was all I had on my friends list lol. If the person was not an actual friend, they was not on my list in those days. Those post has since been deleted. As I deleted all post when I did my first TV show. All my friends that knew I was sick, and the ones just finding out I was sick, everyone said go for it.

Once I decided to go for it. Then I needed to figure out where to get it at a price I could afford. Lets just say I have many friends. Which has helped me. Even if I don’t have any money. If I am having issues. They take care of me best they can.

But even with knowing the right people, it was a gamble. As jail was no place for a person as sick as I was. Even now, a long sit in jail, could possibly cause a relapse. So another issue that needs to be fixed. Hence I started publicly supporting Cannabis reform in KY. Because I really don’t want to have to leave my home for safe access to what I need.

I started out as a hemp, and medical marijuana advocate. But once I started gaining notoriety, I started to learn Medical only in KY, would only be a money making sham. One the common person could not afford. I know this, as I was offered an in on this money making plan. I then seen this would be for the wealthy only. I seen this would create a group to fight further Cannabis reform. Such as a group of people whom would not be making as much, if full regulated came about. I was not selling out, while the common people suffer. Even if this would fix my situation. So now I advocate for Cannabis to be regulated like alcohol.

But before I did. I looked at all angles. When you look at Cannabis verses alcohol. It is clear that Cannabis is safer, less addictive, and pose fewer issues for a community than alcohol. I seen the fact alcohol is harder for teens to get than Marijuana. This is because street dealers don’t ask for ID. So with regulations like alcohol has. Cannabis would be harder for teens to obtain. So I seen no adverse reason that out weighed the good of regulating Cannabis like alcohol.
I seen the economic boost. I seen the decrease in consumption of heroin, and prescription pain pills.

I saw KY being a leading economy in the US. As KY grew 98% of the hemp for WWII. This is because KY has the best overall U.S. environment to grow Cannabis.

To bring this full circle. My mother inlaw would fire into anyone that says I shouldn’t consume Cannabis. She has went to Cannabis reform meetings. She has prepared food for Cannabis reform events. She has attended Cannastock. She has had discussions with her friends. She has helped me anyway she can. To help me help KY bring Cannabis reform to KY.  I have autoimmune disorder. It’s genetic, and Cannabis turns off the illness for me, and many other people.

Even though I didn’t really want to share. I did so in hopes of gaining as much help as possible.

Will you help me bring Cannabis reform to KY?

Would you want to face jail every time you need a prescription filled?

That is my world. Even though I don’t act like it bothers me, it DOES!
It’s not fair. It’s not fair people get pain meds they don’t really need, while I can’t get safe access to what I need. It’s not fair Sudafed is legal, and is what meth is made from. Because people how have a runny nose needs it. So they say the risk is worth it. Meanwhile heck no for Marijuana. Reason, someone will get high. Even though the high from marijuana has NEVER killed 1 person with overdose.

Here are some things you can do, if you you would like to help me.
You can call your KY legislators and ask them to support the new measure to regulate Cannabis in KY like alcohol. The number is (800) 372-7181.

You can tell pass this information on to any Kentuckian you know. And encourage them to make the call as well.

You can email your legislators asking them to support the new measure to regulate cannabis like alcohol.

There will be more you can get involved with. Just be watching as I will be posting various things to help bring this reform to KY.

You are welcome to share this post.

As always, thank you for your continued Cannabis support ,’-) Aihooooo

Written by:  Red Vanwinkle, Kentucky.

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