Tag Archives: Ohio

“Any displays, sale or solicitation of CBD oil is illegal and individuals involved are subject to federal investigation and prosecution.”

CBD oil, sold in stores throughout Ohio, is illegal and can carry a felony charge

CBD oil, sold in stores throughout Ohio, is illegal and can carry a felony charge

By Shannon Houser | October 9, 2018 at 9:49 PM EST – Updated October 10 at 11:26 AM

CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) – CBD oil is available online, in every state and is commonly found on store shelves across Northeast Ohio; however, it’s illegal and can result in a felony charge.

So, why the big confusion over the chemical compound?

“I got pulled over in a traffic stop and long story short, they found CBD oil,” said Robert Faulkner.

It was July of last year when Faulkner was arrested in Richland County.

“I tried it for my anxiety. It didn’t work for me at that particular time and I just threw it in the back on my truck,” he said.

Faulkner said he bought it from a store in Columbus. He said the oil was made and manufactured from a hemp store in Cincinnati.

“I never went to the store and thought I was buying something that would potentially put me in prison,” he said.

Faulkner was slapped with two counts of aggravated possession of drugs. He’s awaiting a grand jury trial for the felony charges.

Here in Ohio, you cannot possess CBD oil. The laws aren’t stopping people from buying it and it’s not stopping stores from selling it.

Faulkner believes the reason is there is so much confusion about the law.

“I didn’t knowingly obtain everything illegal. I went to a store to try to help me with an issue I have,” said Faulkner.

THC is the chemical compound responsible for the high in marijuana. The DEA says they’ve learned through science, that CBD will always contain some amount of THC, even trace amounts that won’t get you high.

But given the presence of THC, the over-the-counter oil is illegal.

Cleveland 19 found two local stores with shelves full of CBD oil.

According to the DEA:

“Any displays, sale or solicitation of CBD oil is illegal and individuals involved are subject to federal investigation and prosecution.”

We found in some states, like in Texas, police are raiding stores who are selling CBD oil.

So why isn’t that happening here if it’s illegal?

The DEA wouldn’t say, but did say stores selling it aren’t immune from federal investigation.

Faulkner says he hopes officials and lawmakers can help make the laws more clear so this doesn’t happen to someone else.

“I have an ankle monitor on right now. I have to go check in with probation. I spent four days in jail. This is impacting my life seriously, for something I bought in at the store to just try to help my anxiety.”

CBD is covered by Ohio’s medical marijuana law–and will be available to those with a medical marijuana card.

The FDA recently approved a CBD oil medication that is used to help treat epilepsy.

It can only be prescribed by licensed doctors.

CONTINUE READING…

RELATED:

Why we must repeal prohibition

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Ohio Activist Dawn Dunlap Has Passed Away

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The following information was sent to me this morning by                 Tonya Davis.  This was an unexpected and particularly tragic           accident.  I met Dawn a few times while vising Tonya in Ohio.                   My heart goes out to her family and friends.

Dawn Maria Dunlap passed away on June 9, 2018 at age 50.

This was due to an auto accident while she was crossing the street with her significant other. Dawn had no children but leaves behind her Partner, her Aunt, her Brother and Parents.

Dawn was physically disabled with a genetic bone disease and confined to a wheelchair. However, this did not prevent her from obtaining an Associates Degree in graphic arts.  She was a champion medical marijuana Activist.  She participated in many forums on physical disabilities.  Additionally she was an adventurous photographer, and created digital works of art and custom jewelry.

She was a woman of strong faith with a strong association to two  different churches. Both churches have lifted her up in their congregations for her strong faith.

All of us know she is in the hands of God and we will be reunited with her at a later date. She brought untold joy into the lives of many.

Dawn was very active on social media including Facebook and You Tube. In fact,  we are sure some of her funny videos can still be found on You Tube. If you are curious search for “Dawn Dunlap” and “Edna”.

If you are so inclined, please donate to the World Giraffe Foundation in lieu of sending flowers. This was Dawn’s favorite charity.

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Dawn is loved and missed by many, leaving a large hole in the lives of family and friends.

The “Celebration of Life” will be held at the Church of Messiah located at 51 N. State St in Westerville, Ohio. The service will be at 11:30 AM on Saturday, June 23.

The will be an hour of visitation before the service at 10:30 AM. A meal and opportunity to share your best stories will be held in the church hall after the service.

Good Bye My Friend

RIP RAGGED07 DAWN DUNLAP YOU WILL BE MISSED

Apparent overdose in Ohio McDonald’s parking lot captured on Facebook live

 

 

 

Alyssa Raymond, WKYC 12:30 PM. CST November 19, 2016

SANDUSKY – A desperate search for help from the man seen in a Facebook Live stream who overdosed in a McDonald’s Parking lot in Sandusky Thursday evening.

The video and the man’s story are a powerful reminder of the heroin and opioid epidemic here in Northeast Ohio. The problem is real and so we want to warn you that we wanted to show you a clear picture, which some of you may find hard to watch. 

But the man on the ground and his family say they are glad this video is out there.

This is real life and people are dying. 

There have been 30 overdoses in 30 days in Sandusky.  Four people died. 

The family of the man you see on the ground wants everyone to share this story and this video.  They want the truth about heroin out there.

In an eleven and a half minute Facebook Live stream, you see a 27-year-old man gasping for air after overdosing on heroin.  That man lying there, seemingly lifeless, is Michael Williams.  Like so many, he watched the video over and over again.

“I was fighting back the tears,” said Michael Williams.  “I got goosebumps and teary eyed.  Like I said, I am a strong individual, and it was hard to watch.”

His older sister, Amber Roesch, found it hard to watch too.

“Watch that video and share it because that is terrifying,” said Roesch.

She hopes users all over the country see what happened to her brother.

“I do not want to have to bury him,” said Roesch.  “He needs help now.”

Amber says a week ago he told her he needed help, and he said it again today.

“I definitely have a problem,” said Williams.  “If I could get the help right now, I would definitely go.  I need it I want it.”

Michael’s family expected the worse when they received that phone call.  But EMS and Narcan saved his life.  Amber says they tried to thank everyone including Eddie Wimbley, the man who recorded it all.

“I hope it is like a wakeup call,” said Wimbley.  “I just do not understand how people can do something knowing that they could possibly die.”

Michael says he started using heroin four months ago.  Before that, he drank a lot and took pain pills.  But when he lost his job, he turned to something cheaper.  Michael will tell you, he never thought it would happen to him, but it did.

You might be wondering why Williams can’t just go out and get the help he needs.  He says he recently lost his job so he does not have insurance and he was told a lot of places would not take Medicaid.  His family told me it costs around $800 a day for him to go to an inpatient facility, which they say that’s what he needs, but cannot afford.

CONTINUE READING AND TO SEE VIDEO!

Marijuana for Millionaires

—By Kevin Drum

| Sun Nov. 1, 2015 2:31 PM EST

41128_424755311230_2510995_nYesterday a friend emailed to ask if I had any thoughts about Ohio’s Issue 3, which would fully legalize marijuana cultivation and sale in the state. Ohio? I barely pay attention to California, let alone Ohio.

But Issue 3 turns out to be surprisingly fascinating—or venal and repellent, depending on your tolerance for sleaze. Apparently one of the authors of the initiative came across a Rand report on marijuana written by a bevy of drug-policy worthies, and it offered up a dozen possible options for legalization. One of them is called "structured oligopoly":

It is natural to ask whether there is some way to get for-profit businesses to behave in the public interest. The answer is “Perhaps.”

….States might prefer instead to offer only a limited number of licenses, creating artificial scarcity that makes the licenses valuable—valuable enough that firms will have a strong incentive to cooperate with regulators rather than risk revocation….Limiting the number of licensees also makes monitoring their behavior easier. A rogue company could more easily break the rules if it were one of 1,000 licensees than if it were one of just ten.

….So a structured-oligopoly strategy might involve licensing a limited number of firms, monitoring them closely, and not being shy about rescinding a firm’s license if it behaves in ways contrary to the public interest.

This might not be your cup of tea, but let’s stipulate that it has some potential. How would you distribute these licenses? The straightforward approach is to auction them off for set periods. Unfortunately, this has a big drawback: it maximizes the payment for licenses, and thus minimizes the profit of the oligopolists. This is obviously vexing.

So how about this instead? Pick out ten rich friends. Each is required to put up $2 million to help pass a ballot initiative. In return, you promise to write the names of the investors directly into the initiative, giving them a perpetual and exclusive right to grow marijuana in the state of Ohio.1 In addition, you write a special, unalterable flat tax rate into the law, as well as a minuscule annual licensing fee. Now that’s an oligopoly you can believe in! Keith Humphreys, who brought this to my attention, has a few comments:

It has taken the alcohol industry decades of lobbying to roll back many of the restrictive, public health-oriented regulations established after the end of Prohibition. Booze industry executives must look with envy upon the emerging marijuana industry, which can use the ballot initiative process to achieve complete regulatory capture from day one.

….No one should be surprised that in a country with an entrepreneurial culture, a commitment to free markets, and a political system highly attuned to corporate donations, legalized marijuana would develop a significant corporate presence. Indeed, many drug policy analysts, including me, expected this to happen eventually. But the rate at which the change is happening is truly startling, and will become even more so if the Ohio initiative passes.

If the marijuana industry ends up being a clone of the tobacco industry, will legalization supporters experience buyers’ remorse? It depends who you ask.

Well, you could ask me. I don’t care what they’re legalizing. This stinks. It’s crony capitalism without even a veneer of decency, and if it applied to anything else nobody would have the gall to ever let it see the light of day. If this is the price of pot legalization, count me out.

1Technically, no names are actually in the initiative. Instead, it limits marijuana cultivation to ten specific parcels of land that are owned by the ten investors. Also, individuals are allowed to cultivate small amounts for their own recreational use if they get a licence.

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Marijuana Mogul? Here’s Why Nick Lachey May Make Millions If Weed Becomes Legal in Ohio

by Bruna Nessif

Fri., Oct. 30, 2015

Nick Lachey

Nick Lachey husband, father, singer, TV host…and potential marijuana kingpin. Yep, you read that right.

The former 98 Degrees boy band member could become one of the largest pot growers in Ohio, if the state votes to legalize marijuana on Tuesday. How so, you ask? Well, according to the Washington Post, the measure indicates that if the Buckeye State becomes green-friendly, it would restrict virtually all large-scale marijuana cultivation to 10 specifically designated farms.

And whaddya know? Nick Lachey part owner of one of those farms, along with designer Nanette Lepore, NBA legend Oscar Robertson, NFL journeyman Frostee Rucker.

PHOTOS: Top 10 stoner movies

Each group reportedly contributed $4 million to the legalization campaign it will cost another $10 million each to get their pot farms set up. Once that happens and the business is a go, these 10 farms would be the only ones legally able to service around 1,100 state-sponsored pot dispensaries.

And while all those millions seem like a lot of money (because, well, it is), it’s actually nothing compared to what these 10 farms could rake in once in business. According to Fox, one study estimates the 10 farms could sell over $1 billion in marijuana every year. BILLION.

When asked about the initiative, Lachey’s rep gave E! News the following statement: "Ohio is my home, and as a resident and local business owner I am proud to be part of a movement that has the potential to create jobs, reinvigorate the local economy and improve the safety of our communities," Lachey said. "Passage of this proposal will result in much-needed economic development opportunities across Ohio, and update the state’s position on marijuana in a smart and safe way."

Guess we’ll see what happens on Tuesday.

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Teen who committed suicide had just been told by school administrators that he had ‘ruined his life’ after marijuana bust at homecoming dance

 

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  • Hayden Long, a 16-year-old sophomore and quarterback at Geneva High School, was found dead on Monday in his family’s Ohio home
  • He was one of six students questioned and disciplined at the school’s homecoming dance on October 3 for smelling like marijuana
  • Long’s friend, Hank Sigel, wrote an open letter describing the conditions in which they were questioned
  • He described himself and the five teens as honor students and athletes
  • Sigel said that Long was singled out by the three questioners, which included a principal, assistant principal and a police officer
  • Sigel said the students faced a two-week suspension, possible criminal charges, suspension from sports and a loss of drivers’ licenses
  • Long’s mother said she does not blame the school for her son’s death

By Kelly Mclaughlin For Dailymail.com

Published: 13:54 EST, 10 October 2015 | Updated: 16:28 EST, 10 October 2015

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3267766/Ohio-teen-blames-Hayden-Long-s-suicide-school-administrators-students-told-ruined-life-marijuana-bust-homecoming-dance.html#ixzz3oLm3Y0FZ

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NORML Hesitantly Backs Ohio Legalization Initiative

A campaign to legalize medical and recreational cannabis in Ohio has garnered a big endorsement from NORML, but the marijuana lobbying organization isn’t thrilled with a key business-related aspect of the measure.

NORML decided to get behind Issue 3, the legalization measure being pushed by Responsible Ohio. However, it expressed concern that the initiative calls for just 10 legal cultivation sites, all of which would be owned by wealthy campaign investors.

Keith Stroup, who founded NORML in 1970 and is now legal counsel for the organization, wrote on the organization’s website that such a restriction is a “perversion of the initiative process,” and he called the ballot measure a “bitter pill to swallow.”

“In this instance, the initiative process is being used to try to make the rich and powerful even more rich and more powerful,” Stroup wrote. “But currently Issue 3 is the only option available to stop the senseless and destructive practice of arresting marijuana smokers in Ohio.”

The NORML board of directors therefore voted to support the measure, but some board members abstained to note their opposition for the record, and one even flat-out opposed the initiative, Stroup wrote.

Issue 3 will be on the ballot this November in Ohio.

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Ohio voters have 2 opposing marijuana issues on November ballot

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (WKBN) – Ohio voters will have to decide on two opposing ballot questions in November.

One issue would allow recreational marijuana use, but the other issue would take away most of the framework of that law.

The Responsible Ohio amendment is Issue 3 and would make growing, selling and using marijuana in Ohio legal. Backers say the new law would free up the courts and bring in millions in tax dollars. Growing would be done at 10 sites around the state. The locations of the sites have already been chosen.

The state assembly put their own issue on the ballot. Issue 2 would make the marijuana cartel illegal immediately.

What analysts do not know is what will happen if both issues pass.

“Now that’s a tricky question that not many people know the answer to. Some say one could trump the other. Some say the one with the most votes wins,” said Faith Oltman of Responsible Ohio.

If the anti-monopoly measure passes, Oltman said that will mean the end of voter’s say in legalizing marijuana.

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Buying the constitution

Big money, not popular demand, is what drives the marijuana proposal

The haphazard signature-gathering effort by backers of a marijuana-legalization ballot issue suggests something other than a grass-roots clamor to bring legalized pot to Ohio.

And the cities and townships where backers of the issue propose to set up their government-sanctioned-monopoly pot farms don’t seem exactly enthusiastic about that prospect.

All in all, the lurching campaign effort shows ResponsibleOhio’s proposal for what it is: a bid to use the mechanics of state government — and, thereby, voters — to create an insider business opportunity for a handful of people. The campaign is driven not by popular demand, but by the big money of the investors who stand to profit.

If a genuine grass-roots group of Ohioans wanted to see marijuana legalized for medical or recreational use, nothing would stop them from circulating petitions in support of that effort. But despite ResponsibleOhio’s complaint that lawmakers have been ignoring a burning desire for years, that supposed desire hasn’t inspired very many people to volunteer to pass petitions.

To get the proposed amendment onto the November ballot, the group is paying people to circulate petitions. To be fair, few groups could muster the hundreds of thousands of valid signatures needed by using volunteers alone; many turn to paid circulators. And ResponsibleOhio’s paid circulators certainly aren’t the first to turn in lots of flawed signatures.

But, a spot check at county boards of elections shows a remarkably shoddy effort by ResponsibleOhio’s circulators: As of Friday, major counties were finding more than half of the signatures invalid for one reason or another. At this rate, when the counting is done, the group won’t have the 305,591 valid signatures required to make the ballot, even though it collected more than double the number. (If that happens, Ohio law allows a 10-day “cure period” for petitioners to try to get the additional signatures needed.)

In Franklin County, as of Tuesday, only 40 percent of 113,000 signatures counted so far were valid. About 26,000 people weren’t registered to vote at the address they listed on the petition; 23,000 weren’t registered at all. About 7,800 were duplicates and 2,600 were deemed “not genuine."

Circulators with any commitment to the cause they’re pushing, beyond a per-signature payment, tend to try a lot harder to get valid signatures.

The pushback from communities that stand to host the constitutionally protected pot farms is more evidence that ResponsibleOhio’s heavy-handed approach is unwise. If the proposal was simply to make marijuana cultivation legal, prospective growers might emerge naturally and work with local officials and residents to win them over.

Instead, ResponsibleOhio’s investors secured rights to properties in 10 locations around the state and wrote a constitutional amendment that would give them exclusive rights and hamper local government’s ability to get in their way.

It’s no wonder Ohioans — those who actually have kept up their voting registrations and are concerned about their communities — aren’t the ones driving this self-serving scheme.

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Ohio election officials warned about pro-marijuana group’s voter registrations

Marijuana leaves

By Jackie Borchardt, Northeast Ohio Media Group
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on June 17, 2015 at 2:38 PM, updated June 17, 2015 at 7:02 PM

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted on Wednesday advised election officials to "carefully analyze" new voter registrations being submitted by The Strategy Network, which is collecting signatures for pro-marijuana legalization group ResponsibleOhio.

County boards of elections have reported an increase in errors and registrations that appear to be fraudulent turned in by the group, Husted said.

"As the state’s chief elections officer, I have a duty to work with our local boards of elections to ensure fairness at the ballot box and a primary component of that responsibility is to maintain clean voter rolls and establish safeguards against fraud," Husted said in a news release. "ResponsibleOhio’s suspicious voter registration efforts seem to be simply another step in a growing trend of irresponsible behavior."

According to Husted’s office, counties have reported:

  • Registrants who report non-existent addresses;
  • Signatures that are illegible or do not match the signature on file for the applicant in the voter’s existing registration record;
  • Multiple applications submitted on the same day for a single applicant at different addresses;
  • Applicants who are underage and will not turn 18 before the next general election; and
  • Multiple registration forms that appear to be completed in the same handwriting.

ResponsibleOhio announced last week it had collected more than 550,000 signatures and about 10 percent of those also completed new voter registration forms. ResponsibleOhio Executive Director Ian James also owns The Strategy Network, a well-known Columbus consulting firm that specializes in collecting signatures for ballot issue campaigns.

James said Husted’s letter was the first the campaign had heard of problems with its voter registrations. James said petition circulators follow the law for voter registrations, which allow them to complete portions of the registration form.

"[My company] has collected 5.6 million signatures  and we’re registering tens of thousands of people to vote. We take the responsibility of compliance with Ohio election law very seriously," James said.

James said Husted’s warning is the latest move by elected politicians to thwart ResponsibleOhio’s effort. State lawmakers are considering their own constitutional amendment targeted at ResponsibleOhio that would nullify amendments that benefit an economic interest .

"There is somewhat of a concern that we’re going to qualify for the ballot, that voters are going to be able to vote for the issue that they overwhelmingly support, that voters are going to legalize marijuana in Ohio," James said. "And there are some who don’t want to have that happen and are pulling all the stops to try to stop voters from having their say on this matter."

ResponsibleOhio wants to legalize marijuana for personal and recreational use for adults over age 21 and limit commercial growing to 10 sites promised to campaign investors. The group must collect more than 305,591 valid signatures of registered Ohio voters by July 1 to qualify for the November ballot.

Signatures are sent to county boards of election for verification, and groups often register signers to vote in Ohio in hopes of increasing validity.

In at least two counties, Husted wrote in a letter to James, registrations were turned in for 16-year-old applicants. One of those applicants told the county elections board director he was advised to complete the form even after explaining he was not old enough to vote.

Husted spokesman Joshua Eck said the office didn’t have a total number of irregularities but boards in Cuyahoga County and 12 others have reported suspicious registrations: Butler, Clermont, Delaware, Erie, Fairfield, Franklin, Hamilton, Meigs, Paulding, Ross and Scioto counties.

Earlier this year, Husted joined fellow Republican statewide elected officials in denouncing the amendment. At that time, Husted said it was offensive to ask Ohioans to give a constitutional monopoly to the marijuana industry and he would "vigorously" ask voters to defeat it.

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Ann Marie Miller: Is ex-MMJ Caregiver Mystery Woman With Burned-Off Fingerprints?

By Michael Roberts Fri., Aug. 8 2014 at 10:50 AM

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A bizarre story out of Ohio in which a woman burned off her fingerprints to hide her identity has a Colorado connection — one that appears to pertain to Ann Marie Miller, a onetime medical marijuana caregiver charged with assorted crimes who was featured in this space on several occasions.

The name’s the same and many of the details are extremely similar in a story that’s strange and getting stranger.

See also: Medical Marijuana: Ann Marie Miller Sues North Metro Drug Task Force, Sheriff Over MMJ Raid

Our first post about Miller dates back to June 2010. Miller told us that she’d been working as an apartment manager at a complex in Adams County when she got into a dispute with the landlord over an alleged theft. A short time later, the landlord entered her apartment to investigate a water leak and found she had numerous marijuana plants.

Miller said she was both a medical marijuana patient and a caregiver, but the landlord called the cops, who determined she had more plants than was legally allowable. She also complained that law enforcers trashed her place — a claim a police representative denied.

A few days later, Miller told us she returned to her apartment to find she’d been locked out and her belongings placed in the parking lot — everything except her plants. So she and a friend broke a window in order to get her marijuana back — a decision that ended with her being charged with second-degree burglary and misdemeanor theft in addition to marijuana cultivation.

The latter charge was listed as a felony even though a law change months later would have made her offense a misdemeanor.

The following February, Miller filed lawsuits against police over the raid — complaints she created herself. She also decided to fight the felony marijuana charge even though she was offered a misdemeanor deal. The reason? She didn’t want a guilty plea on her record because she feared losing custody of a son born in October. According to her, she’d left the boy home alone when he was just a few weeks old in order to visit the emergency room. As a result, he was taken away from her in the wake of a neglect accusation.

A month later, Miller said the marijuana charge against her had been dropped, leaving just the theft and child abuse allegations. But the latest developments call this assertion into question.

The next chapter of the tale is shared by WZVN-TV in Fort Myers, Florida. The station reports that a woman identifying herself as Julia Wadsworth was arrested in Lima, Ohio, after trying to obtain a driver’s license using a bogus birth certificate. But when trying to confirm her identity during the booking process, police discovered she’d burned her fingerprints off.

Voter registration records showed that a woman named Julia Wadsworth had previously been living in a mobile home in the community of Fort Myers Beach. There, she’d been the caregiver for an elderly resident. But since no one knew if Wadsworth was her real name — and because she otherwise declined to cooperate — the cops circulated a photo of the woman as a Jane Doe.

Other pics were shared by the Lima News, an Ohio newspaper, including images from a court appearance when she was said to have been acting in a weird manner. Here’s one of those images, as shared on the WZVN broadcast:

julia.wadsworth.screen.capture.jpg

The photos inspired a call from a tipster, who said the woman was most likely Ann Marie Miller — and investigators have now said they believe that to be true.

But is this Ann Marie Miller the one involved in the events detailed above? Well, the Lima News describes her as a “40-year-old disbarred attorney from Virginia” who’d been charged with assorted crimes, including tampering with a vehicle identification number, burglary, assault, stalking, disorderly conduct and threatening language over a public airway owing to a “love triangle” with a “male attorney” who “left her for a paralegal in their office.”

However, the local sheriff also said Miller is wanted in Colorado for charges that include “burglary, two counts of possession of burglary tools, trespassing, criminal mischief and a felony marijuana cultivation charge.”

We can’t confirm that the woman in these photos is the Ann Marie Miller with whom we spoke; all of our communication took place over the phone. But if she’s not, it’s a mighty large coincidence. Here’s the aforementioned WZVN report about “Julia Wadsworth.”

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TAKE THE POLAR PLUNGE WITH Michael Revercomb-Hickman FOR “SPECIAL OLYMPICS”…

 

The mission of Special Olympics Ohio is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for individuals with intellectual disabilities by giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community.
Special Olympics is founded on the belief that people with intellectual disabilities can, with proper instruction and encouragement, learn, enjoy and benefit from participation in individual and team sports, adapted as necessary to meet the needs of those special mental and physical limitations.

Event Logo

 

Welcome to the Donation Page of Michael Revercomb-Hickman

(FOLLOW THE LINK ABOVE TO DONATE TO MICHAEL OR READ MORE ABOUT IT)

 

MICHAEL SAY’S….

“I am jumping as a representative of Central Ohio NORML and the Ohio Rights Group

and I’m out to prove that marijuana users are active, productive members of the

community and it would be amazing if people could show their support.”

 

Support Michael Revercomb-Hickman by donating to a wonderful charity cause. Whether it be $5 or $100

any and all donations will be highly appreciated. He will be participating in the 2014 polar plunge.

Proceeds go to the 2014 special Olympics. Thanks in advance!

http://www.kintera.org/faf/donorReg/donorPledge.asp?ievent=1088523&supId=397817554&extSiteType=1

 

*The U.S. Marijuana Party and Kentucky Marijuana Party endorses Michael’s efforts and applauds him for his devotion.