Tag Archives: UNODC

(2017) 60th session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (UNODC)

 

 

Aldo Lale-Demoz

Aldo Lale-Demoz

@AldoLale

UNODC Deputy Executive Director & Director, Division for Operations


unodc.org

60 UNODC


PRESS RELEASE

Alternative development can release farmers from the poverty trap of illicit crop cultivation

 

Vienna, 14 March 2017 – Alternative development can help farmers escape the poverty trap of illicit crop cultivation, but other factors are also involved, the head of UNODC Yury Fedotov said today.

“The transfer of skills and access to land, credit, and infrastructure, as well as marketing support and access to markets, while promoting environmental sustainability and community ownership are all necessary,” he said.

Mr. Fedotov was speaking at an event about alternative development held on the sidelines of the 60th Session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND), organized by Thailand, Germany, Colombia and Peru. Welcoming remarks were delivered by UNODC’s Goodwill Ambassador on the Rule of Law for South East Asia, HRH Princess Bajrakitiyabha Mahidol of Thailand.

Both the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the outcome document of last April’s UN General Assembly Special Session on the world drug problem pointed to the need to overcome the challenge of illicit drugs to achieve the sustainable development goals, said the UNODC Chief.  

UNODC has over 40 years’ experience implementing alternative development programmes and assisting countries in this work. This led, said Mr. Fedotov, to UNODC assisting Thailand and Peru to hold two international conferences on alterative development (ICAD I and II) and develop the UN Guiding Principles on the subject.

Mr. Fedotov underlined the need to strengthen the research and regular monitoring of key indicators to better understand and evaluate the contribution of alternative development to the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.

UNODC’s World Drug report 2015 provided a detailed chapter on alternative development setting out the interplay between development and the challenge of illicit drugs.

Alternative development programmes are aimed at helping to eliminate the cultivation of coca, opium poppy and cannabis by promoting licit farming alternatives and helping to sustain the lives of farmers and their families.

For further information please contact:

David Dadge 
Spokesperson, UNODC 
Telephone: (+43 1) 26060-5629 
Mobile: (+43-699) 1459-5629 
Email: david.dadge[at]unvienna.org

SOURCE LINK


PRESS RELEASE

UNODC Chief sets out global efforts being taken against illicit drugs

 

Vienna, 13 March 2017 – The efforts of UNODC against illicit drugs is helping to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, as well as promote peace and security, UNODC Chief Yury Fedotov told a high-level audience in Vienna today.

“Alternative development is aimed at, not only reducing the cultivation of coca, opium poppy and cannabis, but also improving the socio-economic conditions of marginalized farming communities,” said Mr. Fedotov.

In a video message played at the opening ceremony, the UN Secretary-General António Guterres said: “The Commission led an open and inclusive preparatory process for the UN General Assembly Special Session in 2016. Its unanimous outcome is rich and forward-looking – promising a more comprehensive approach to the world drug problem.” 

Mr. Fedotov used his keynote speech to set out the full range of UNODC’s global efforts against illicit drugs. He pointed to the help being given to countries to bring drug lords to justice, the promotion of cooperation in the justice and health sectors, and UNODC’s support for alternatives to conviction or punishment for minor offences.

UNODC was, he said, working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) on a number of activities, including best practices to treat drug use disorders as an alternative to criminal justice sanctions. HIV/AIDS responses were also being fast-tracked by UNODC, as a UNAIDS co-sponsor, among people who use drugs, and people in prisons. 

Mr. Fedotov was firm in stating that UNODC would continue to help strengthen access to controlled drugs for medical purposes. He said UNODC was raising awareness of this issue through the World Cancer Congress and the UN Task Force on Non-Communicable Diseases.

On the follow-up to last year’s UN General Assembly special session on the world drug problem, Mr. Fedotov said UNODC was focused on the “practical implementation” of the recommendations made in its outcome document. “You may always count on UNODC to help put these approaches into action,” he said.

Mr. Fedotov was speaking at the opening of the 60th Session of the CND.  Speeches were also delivered by the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the United States, Dr. Nora Volkow, the President of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) Werner Sipp, and representatives of youth and civil society. 

The 60th Session of the CND brings together around 1,500 delegates annually representing Member States, inter-governmental organizations, and civil society for a global discussion on the world drug problem. This year, the Commission will discuss 12 draft resolutions, hold around 100 side events and a series of exhibitions.

UN Secretary-General António Guterres Message on the 60th anniversary of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

Remarks of the UNODC Executive Director, Yury Fedotov, at the opening of the 60th Session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

For further information please contact:

David Dadge
Spokesperson, UNODC
Telephone: (+43 1) 26060-5629
Mobile: (+43-699) 1459-5629
Email: david.dadge[at]unvienna.org

SOURCE LINK


The Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) was established by Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) resolution 9(I) in 1946, to assist the ECOSOC in supervising the application of the international drug control treaties. In 1991, the General Assembly (GA) expanded the mandate of the CND to enable it to function as the governing body of the UNODC. ECOSOC resolution 1999/30 requested the CND to structure its agenda with two distinct segments: a normative segment for discharging treaty-based and normative functions; and an operational segment for exercising the role as the governing body of UNODC.  

Commissions

 


 

https://twitter.com/AldoLale/status/832632912705003521/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/AldoLale

http://www.unodc.org/documents/commissions/CND_CCPCJ_joint/Side_Events/2017/Programme_CND_60.pdf

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/press/releases/2017/March/alternative-development-can-release-farmers-from-the-poverty-trap-of-illicit-crop-cultivation.html

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/press/releases/2017/March/unodc-chief-sets-out-global-efforts-being-taken-against-illicit-drugs.html

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/commissions/CND/index.html?ref=menutop

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The Golden Triangle was recently replaced as the world’s dominant opium producer by a new regional power known as the Golden Crescent,

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Asia’s opium hubs

The opiates that addicts swallow, snort and inject often begin their journey to India from the Golden Triangle and the Golden Crescent. The former is Southeast Asia’s primary hub for opium cultivation. Located along the Mekong river, where the borders of Myanmar, Laos and Thailand converge, the illicit trade thrives — exceeding $16.3 billion per year, according to a 2014 UN report. Though eradication efforts in the late ’90s and early 2000s caused the area’s opium cultivation to decline, it began surging again in 2006, partly because improvements in transportation made it easier to move the drug from place to place.

The Golden Triangle is currently the world’s second-largest opium producer. A 2014 report by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimated the region’s opiate poppy cultivation rose to 63,800 hectares last year, compared with 61,200 hectares in 2013, nearly triple the amount harvested in 2006. Myanmar is the region’s leading opium cultivator.

Poverty and a lack of economic opportunity fuel illicit opium farming throughout the Golden Triangle, say researchers. In one survey in Burma, village farmers said they cultivated opium poppy just to provide for basic essentials such as food, education and housing. Researchers say economic development in these areas may be the best way to prevent opium growing.

The Golden Triangle was recently replaced as the world’s dominant opium producer by a new regional power known as the Golden Crescent, an area comprising Afghanistan and Pakistan. Afghanistan is the world’s largest opium producer and Pakistan primarily serves as an illicit drug trafficking route.

A 2014 World Drug Report said war-torn Afghanistan accounted for 90 per cent of global opium production. In 2013, the country cultivated an estimated 5,500 tons of oven-dried opium, which translates into roughly four per cent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product. Further, the already substantial opium cultivation area is growing. According to the report, the farming area increased by 36 per cent from 154,000 hectares in 2012 to 209,000 hectares in 2013. This uptick in Afghanistan’s opium cultivation continues despite the fact that the USA has invested more than seven billion dollars to combat the issue. A 2014 report from the US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction described how the country’s opium cultivation was at an all-time high, despite more than a decade of US-led counter-narcotics efforts.

Afghanistan’s illicit opium production and trafficking is a multibillion-dollar industry where the Taliban-funded terrorist organisations reap the most profit. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that in 2009 the Afghan Taliban earned around $155 million from the illicit opium trade, while Afghan drug traffickers acquired $2.2 billion — a grim reminder of how drugs fuel crime and terrorism as well as addiction.

Read more at http://www.thestatesman.com/news/supplements/asia-s-opium-hubs/67888.html#vzM0UJoVOcxbDmA7.99

International Anti-Drug Forum begins today

International Anti-Drug Forum begins today

The First Qatar International Anti-Drug Forum will start today, under the patronage of HE the Prime Minister and Interior Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Nasser bin Khalifa al-Thani, at Sheraton Doha.
The two-day forum is organised by the Ministry of Interior on the theme “International experiences in the detection of trafficking routes and itineraries and methods of
concealment”.
High-level international figures in the anti-drug trafficking field will participate in the forum. They include Interpol secretary-general Jürgen Stock, UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) executive director Yury Fedotov, Council of Arab Interior Ministers secretary general Dr Mohamed bin Ali Koman, Arab Office on Drugs director Brigadier General Issa Qaqish Hatem Ali, and GCC UNODC office head
Justice Hatem Ali.
Delegates from more than 22 countries and many regional and international bodies and organisations will also attend the forum.
Lt Colonel Ibrahim Mohammed al-Samih, chairman of the scientific committee of the forum, said that heads of anti-drug bodies in GCC countries will participate in the forum along with directors of coasts and borders security and customs and port authorities. A number of representatives from Arab countries and South, East and West Asia, Europe, America and Africa will
also take part.
“More than 250 officials and experts are expected to attend this international event, where they will discuss more than 16 papers presented by a group of specialists in the field of counter-narcotics from around the world. The discussion of these papers will bring some of the findings and recommendations that will contribute in countering the drug problem and uncovering drug trafficking routes,” he said.

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